Hall Lane, RM14

Road in/near Cranham

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Road · Cranham · RM14 · Contributed by The Underground Map
MARCH
10
2017



Hall Lane is a road in the RM14 postcode area



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VIEW THE CRANHAM AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE CRANHAM AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE CRANHAM AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE CRANHAM AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE CRANHAM AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Cranham

Cranham is a residential suburb, forming the eastern edge of London's urban sprawl.

The parish is recorded in 1086 as being heavily wooded, supporting an agrarian way of life. Forest clearance was well advanced by the 15th century, with an increase in population and arable land; and there was a windmill in Cranham. Cranham formed an ancient parish of 1879 acres in the Chafford hundred of Essex.

In the 17th and 18th centuries manorial homes, including Cranham Hall, became attractive properties for merchants from the City of London. Initial attempts to expand the suburban estates from Upminster in the early 20th century ran into problems because of the lack of water supply.

Cranham lay on London clay and this gave rise to the Cranham Brick and Tile Company which was in operation from 1900 to 1920. In 1922 sewage works for Upminster and Cranham were opened in Great Warley. In the 1930s land was used to develop some council housing and following the sale of the Benyon estate the pace of new building quickened. Cranham's location on the very edge of London's urban sprawl is explained by the halting effect on suburban house building of the introduction of the Metropolitan Green Belt and World War II.

Thereafter building took place within the area bounded by the Southend Arterial Road in the north and St Mary's Lane in the south; and there were 615 council houses built by 1971.

To reflect the significantly increased population in the area, Romford Rural District was abolished in 1934 and Cranham was amalgamated with neighbouring parishes into Hornchurch Urban District. The parish council was abolished and Hornchurch Urban District Council became the local authority. In 1965 Hornchurch Urban District was abolished and its former area was transferred from Essex to Greater London, to be combined with that of the Municipal Borough of Romford in order to form the present-day London Borough of Havering. In 1993 the Greater London boundary, to the east of Cranham and north of the railway line, was locally realigned to the M25 motorway, returning some mostly unpopulated areas of open land to Essex and leaving North Ockendon as the only part of Greater London outside the bounds of the motorway.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Cranham:   Cranham is a residential suburb, forming the eastern edge of London's urban sprawl.
Crowley Turf Supplies Ltd:   
Engayne Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 5 and 11.
Hall Mead School:   Academy converter (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Tylers Common:   


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Avon Road, RM14 · Bird Lane, RM14 · Blenheim Close, RM14 · Blyth Walk, RM14 · Brookmans Close, RM14 · Brookmans Park Drive, RM14 · Chelmer Road, RM14 · Claremont Gardens, RM14 · Colne Valley, RM14 · Crouch Valley, RM14 · Dart Close, RM14 · Dee Close, RM14 · Deyncourt Gardens, RM14 · Dorkins Way, RM14 · Eldred Gardens, RM14 · Esdaile Gardens, RM14 · Eversleigh Gardens, RM14 · Fleet Avenue, RM14 · Fleet Close, RM14 · Folkes Lane, RM14 · Forth Road, RM14 · Front Lane, RM14 · Gadsden Close, RM14 · Hall Lane, RM14 · High Elms, RM14 · Holden Way, RM14 · Humber Drive, RM14 · Ingrebourne Gardens, RM14 · Kennet Close, RM14 · Macon Way, RM14 · Marlborough Close, RM14 · Marlborough Gardens, RM14 · Mersey Avenue, RM14 · Nyth Close, RM14 · Queens Gardens, RM14 · Roseberry Gardens, RM14 · Saint Mary’s Lane, RM14 · Severn Drive, RM14 · St Mary’s Lane, RM14 · St Mary’s Lane, RM14 · Stour Way, RM14 · Tabrums Way, RM14 · Tamar Close, RM14 · Tees Close, RM14 · The Fairway, RM14 · The Leas, RM14 · Tomkyns Lane, CM13 · Tomkyns Lane, RM14 · Trent Avenue, RM14 ·
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What is Hall Lane, RM14 like as a place to live?

Data from placeilive.com/

Links

Edith’s Streets
A wander through London, street by street
Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.
Time Out
Listings magazine

Maps


Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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