Sudbury Park Farm

Farm in/near Wembley, existed between 1897 and 1938

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Farm · Wembley · HA0 ·
MARCH
16
2017

Sudbury Park Farm was opened by the Barham family in 1897, although its fields had been part of another farm, known as North Farm, by the mid-19th century.

A postcard of Harrow Road, c.1910, showing Crabs House on the right and Sudbury Park Farm on the left.
Credit: Brent Archives
George Barham had founded the Express Dairy Company in the 1860s, to bring fresh milk to London from the country by train. Around 1880, the family moved into Crabs House (now part of the Barham Park buildings) on the Harrow Road, and bought the mansion in whose grounds it stood in 1895, renaming it Sudbury Park.

The Express Dairy was already supplying milk to Queen Victoria, but their new “model dairy farm”, across the road from Crabs House, with its pedigree herd of Jersey cattle, allowed George Barham, and his son Titus, to demonstrate the latest methods of dairy farming to other milk producers from around Britain and the world. Milk from the farm was very popular, and some of it was supplied to trans-Atlantic liners. When, the by then, Sir George Barham died in 1913, Titus Barham inherited the Express Dairy retail business and the farm, while his brother, Arthur, took over the Dairy Supply Company wholesale business (later United Dairies on One Hundred Elms Farm).

Titus Barham lived at the Sudbury Park mansion until his death in 1937, and was very fond of his cattle (he used to act as a judge at agricultural shows). The dairy farm supplied milk and butter to local Express Dairy shops, and for delivery to local homes, especially after the company pioneered the use of glass milk bottles by the 1920s.

As well as running his dairy company, Titus Barham did much for local charities. When plans were proposed for a new public hospital in Wembley, he donated some of the Sudbury Park Farm land in Chaplin Road as a site for it. By 1930, he also had to sell some of the land to Wembley Council, for a new junior school, which was named after him.

The Express Dairy Co. sold off the remaining fields of Sudbury Park Farm for housing development by the late-1930s, although Wembley’s plans for an estate of Council homes on part of the land had to wait until after the Second World War. Its main road is called Farm Avenue.

Although it no longer had Sudbury Park Farm, the Express Dairy business continued to deliver milk to local homes for much of the 20th century.


Main source: Brent Council
Further citations and sources


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A postcard of Harrow Road, c.1910, showing Crabs House on the right and Sudbury Park Farm on the left.
Brent Archives


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