Corner of Abingdon Road and Scarsdale Villas

Image dated 1960

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Photo taken in a northerly direction · Kensington · W8 ·
MARCH
19
2017

This view shows Tyler the chemists during the 1960s.

The corner depicted is that of Abingdon Road and Scarsdale Villas, showing the church in the background.
In the background the church in Scarsdale Villas can be seen.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

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The corner depicted is that of Abingdon Road and Scarsdale Villas, showing the church in the background.
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Mary Harris
Mary Harris   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 17:12 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:1:41120
Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

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LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 12 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:2:41120
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.
Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=22159

VIEW THE KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1750s
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VIEW THE KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1800s
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VIEW THE KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1830s
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VIEW THE KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1860s
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VIEW THE KENSINGTON AREA IN THE 1900s
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Kensington

Kensington is a district of West London, England within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, located west of Charing Cross.

The focus of the area is Kensington High Street, a busy commercial centre with many shops, typically upmarket. The street was declared London's second best shopping street in February 2005 thanks to its range and number of shops.

The edges of Kensington are not well-defined; in particular, the southern part of Kensington blurs into Chelsea, which has a similar architectural style. To the west, a transition is made across the West London railway line and Earl's Court Road further south into other districts, whilst to the north, the only obvious dividing line is Holland Park Avenue, to the north of which is the similar district of Notting Hill.

Kensington is, in general, an extremely affluent area, a trait that it now shares with its neighbour to the south, Chelsea. The area has some of London's most expensive streets and garden squares.

Kensington is also very densely populated; it forms part of the most densely populated local government district (the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea) in the United Kingdom. This high density is not formed from high-rise buildings; instead, it has come about through the subdivision of large mid-rise Victorian and Georgian terraced houses (generally of some four to six floors) into flats.
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