St Mary’s Churchyard

Cemetery/graveyard in/near Hendon, existing until now

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Cemetery/graveyard · Hendon · NW4 ·
August
17
2018

St Mary’s Churchyard is also known as ’Hendon Churchyard’.


The churchyard is important archaeologically, as Roman artifacts have been found on the site and there is evidence of Anglo-Saxon settlement.

A church may have existed on the site as early as the ninth century, and there is an eleventh-century font still in use in the existing building. Parts of it date back to the thirteenth century, but there were successive alterations until it was extended in 1914-15.

The churchyard has many tombs and memorials, and there are cedar and yew trees. A line of headstones on either side of the path lead to the church door, and they form part of the best collection of eighteenth century headstones in London. Burials go back seven to eight hundred years, and as a result the soil contains fragments of bone. Part of it is gravelled, which is unusual in Christian graveyards.

The earliest surviving grave is that of Thomas Marsh dated 1624. Fine monuments include the grave of the engraver Abraham Raimbach, the physician James Parsons and Emily Patmore, the wife of poet Coventry Patmore. Edward Longmore, a famous giant, was buried there in 1777, but his body was stolen by grave robbers. A twentieth century grave is of Herbert Chapman, the pre-war manager of Arsenal Football Club.

There are twenty Commonwealth service personnel buried in the churchyard, eleven from World War I and nine from World War II, most of whose graves could not be located so are commemorated by special memorial.

There is access to the churchyard from Church End and Church Terrace. It is part of the Sunny Hill Park and Hendon Churchyard Site of Local Importance for Nature Conservation.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37007642
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37007642


Lynne Hqapgood
Lynne Hqapgood   
Added: 12 Feb 2018 11:05 GMT   
IP: 213.122.132.80
2:1:4134
Post by Lynne Hqapgood: Hutton Grove, N12

I have a question rather than a comment. When was 80 Hutton Grove built? My parents, Eddie and Margaret Hapgood, lived at 80 Hutton Grove from 1934 until sometime during the war,and I would love to know if they moved into a new-build house during the big suburban expansion in the 1930s. Does anyone out there know?! I visited very recently to see the road and the frontage of the house for the first time.

John Dye
John Dye   
Added: 1 Dec 2017 14:50 GMT   
IP: 86.131.134.236
2:2:4134
Post by John Dye: Cool Oak Lane, NW9

I lived at Queensbury Road, Kingsbury during World War II and used to play regularly along the edge of the Welsh Harp. About halfway along Cool Oak Lane on the south side was a pond we used to call Froggy Pond. It was the only place I ever saw a water scorpion, Nepa cinerea.
At the end of the war, all the street air raid shelters were knocked down and the rubble was piled up on the ground south of the Cool Oak Lane bridge, on the Hendon side. I remember that this heap of rubble became infested with rats and I used to watch them from the bridge. I was told that an old house on the south side of Cool Oak Lane (Woodfield House?) was once owned by the wife of Horatio Nelson. I think it later became the nurseries for plants grown for the Hendon parks.

Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton
Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 22:50 GMT   
IP: 94.3.120.166
2:3:4134
Post by Irene Whitby..maiden name crighton: Netherwood Street, NW6

I was born at 63netherwood street.need to know who else lived there.i think I moved out because of a fire but not sure


Ron
Ron   
Added: 24 Sep 2017 22:22 GMT   
IP: 92.6.6.10
2:4:4134
Post by Ron: Colindale

The leather business and ’Leatherville’ was set up by Arthur Garstin, not GARSTON.
:o)

Martina
Martina   
Added: 13 Jul 2017 21:22 GMT   
IP: 146.198.174.6
2:5:4134
Post by Martina: Schweppes Factory

The site is now a car shop and Angels Fancy Dress shop and various bread factories are there.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 12 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:6:4134
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Granville Road connects the High Road with Ballards Lane.
Granville Road connects the High Road with Ballards Lane.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=19326

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 5 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:7:4134
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=10027

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 3 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:8:4134
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
North End Way is the name for the southernmost section of North End Road - running from Hampstead to Golders Green.
North End Way is the name for the southernmost section of North End Road - running from Hampstead to Golders Green.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=25082

VIEW THE HENDON AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE HENDON AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE HENDON AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE HENDON AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE HENDON AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Hendon

Hendon railway station is a National Rail station situated to the west of Hendon, in the London Borough of Barnet.

The station was built by the Midland Railway in 1868 on its extension to St. Pancras. From 1875 the Midland opened a service to Victoria on the London, Chatham and Dover Railway and received coaches from the London and South Western Railway for attachment to north-bound trains.
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