Dorset Street, E1

Road in/near Whitechapel, existed between 1674 and 1963

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  FULLSCREEN  STREETS  RECENT  BLOG  HELP  CONTACT 
54.158.52.166 Advanced
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302018Fullscreen map
Road · Whitechapel · E1 · Contributed by The Underground Map
APRIL
18
2017
Nos.26 and 27 Dorset Street with the entrance to Miller’s Court between, 1928.
Credit: Leonard Matters

Dorset Street was a small thoroughfare running east-west from Crispin Street to Commercial Street.

Developed as a footpath across the south side of the ’Spital Field’ in 1674. Originally known as Datchett Street after the Berkshire home of the Wheler family who owned much land in this area, the name was soon corrupted to Dorset Street.

By the mid 18th century, Dorset Street, like many others in the area, was the home of artisans and silk weavers, living and working in four-storey townhouses with attic workshops, however these prosperous times came to an end by the 1840s and many properties were turned into common lodging houses. A pub, the Blue Coat Boy, stood on the north side (first recorded in 1825, but thought to be considerably older), approximately half way along the street and is believed to be one of the first pubs to serve the nearby market. The Blue Coat Boy was later joined by two more pubs, The Horn of Plenty on the northern corner with Crispin Street and the Britannia, a beer house, on the corner with Commercial Street.

There were many lodging houses in Dorset Street by 1888, at nos.9, 10, 11-12, 15-20 (Commercial Street Chambers), 28-30 and 35 (Crossingham’s Lodging House), earning it the nickname of ’Dosset Street’. John McCarthy owned a chandler’s shop at No.27 and also No.26, known as ’the shed’. Between these properties was a brick archway which led to Miller’s Court.

The street was notable for its poor character - on 17 March 1898, it was visited by George Duckworth, a survey assistant collecting information which would eventually lead to an update of Charles Booth’s ’Descriptive Map of London Poverty’. Accompanied by Sergeant French of H-division, he was taken aback by the conditions he saw:

"The worst street I have seen so far - thieves, prostitutes, bullies, all common lodging houses. Some called ’doubles’ with double beds for married couples but merely another name for brothels. Women bedraggled, torn skirts, dirty, unkempt, square jaws standing about in street or on doorsteps."

Probably as a result of the street’s poor reputation, its name was changed to Duval Street on 28 June 1904. In 1920, the Corporation of London purchased Spitalfields Market and planned a major expansion which resulted in the construction of the Fruit Exchange and the demolition of the north side of Duval Street (including Miller’s Court) in 1928. That year, the author Leonard Matters visited and photographed the street mere days before redevelopment:

"What Dorset Street was like seventy years ago can only be imagined from an inspection of the district today and a walk through narrow lanes and byways leading off Commercial Street and Brick Lane. Duval Street itself is undergoing change, and the buildings on the left-hand side going east have nearly all been torn down to make room for extensions to Spitalfields Market.

"At the time of my first visit to the neighbourhood most of the houses on the left-hand side of the street were unoccupied, and some were being demolished. The house in which Kelly was murdered was closed, save for one front room still occupied by a dreadful looking slattern who came out of Miller’s Court into the sunlight and blinked at me. When she saw me focus my camera to get a picture of the front of the house, the old hag swore at me, and shuffled away down the passage.

"I took what is probably the last photograph of the house to be secured by anybody, for three days later Miller’s Court and the dilapidated buildings on either side of it were nothing but a heap of bricks and mortar. The housebreakers had completely demolished the crumbling wreck of the slum dwelling in which "Jack the Ripper" committed his last crime! Miller’s Court, when I saw it, was nothing but a stone flagged passage between two houses, the upper stories of which united and so formed an arch over the entrance. Over this arch there was an iron plate bearing the legend, "Miller’s Court." The passage was three feet wide and about twenty feet long, and at the end of it there was a small paved yard, about fifteen feet square. Abutting on this yard, or "court", was the small back room in which the woman Kelly was killed - a dirty, damp and dismal hovel, with boarded-up windows and a padlocked door as though the place had not been occupied since the crime was committed.

"But the strange thing was that nobody in the neighbourhood seemed to know the history of Miller’s Court..."
Refresh Image
You can completely dispense with this CAPTCHA palava by logging onto our Facebook app.
Contribution type:
 

If you authorise our The Undeground Map Facebook app by clicking the Facebook logo at the top right of the screen, you can add stories, photos and more to this location.
Note that the Undeground Map Facebook app does not post to Facebook on your behalf.
Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:39 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:1:42016
Post by Jan: Kerbela Street, E2

My grandparents lived in Kerbela Street many years ago when they were terraced houses. My memory of the street is one long street with these strange wrought iron things outside - which I now know as boot scrapers. The house inside was fairly large, but I was a child. Loo was outside. Shame they knocked the terraces down and build a huge housing estate, but that?s progress I suppose. Does anyone know the origin of the name Kerbela?

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 21:20 GMT   
IP:
3:2:42016
Post by LDNnews: Borough
The woman reclaiming nude for women of colour
The woman reclaiming nude for women of colour

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45501496

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 21:20 GMT   
IP:
3:3:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bank
Pret baguette inquest: Plea for help after allergic reaction
The 15-year-old’s father held a phone to her ear so her mother and brother could say goodbye.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-45623831

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 11:40 GMT   
IP:
3:4:42016
Post by LDNnews: Cannon Street
Cladding linked to Grenfell to be stripped from Greenwich high-rise building
Plans to strip a high-rise building in Greenwich of Grenfell-like cladding have been put in to the council.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16898781.cladding-linked-to-grenfell-to-be-stripped-from-greenwich-building/?ref=rss

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 11:40 GMT   
IP:
3:5:42016
Post by LDNnews: St Pauls
Sadness ahead of Deptford pie and mash shop closing down after 128 years

A Deptford café, which has been present for 128 years, will be nothing more than a memory next month.


http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16898842.aj-goddard-pie-and-mash-in-deptford-to-close-after-128-years/?ref=rss

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 11:30 GMT   
IP:
3:6:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bethnal Green
Laurent Koscielny challenges Alex Iwobi to 'realise how good he can be' at Arsenal
Laurent Koscielny has challenged Alex Iwobi to fulfil his prodigious potential after an impressive start to life at Arsenal under Unai Emery.

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/laurent-koscielny-challenges-alex-iwobi-to-realise-how-good-he-can-be-at-arsenal-a3943931.html

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 24 Sep 2018 11:30 GMT   
IP:
3:7:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bermondsey
Tottenham not good enough this season but we've turned a corner, says Danny Rose
Danny Rose admits Tottenham have not been good enough this season, but he hopes they have put their mini-slump behind them with their victory against Brighton.

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/tottenham-not-good-enough-this-season-but-weve-turned-a-corner-says-danny-rose-a3944011.html

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 22:30 GMT   
IP:
3:8:42016
Post by LDNnews: Borough
Arsenal 2-0 Everton: Alexandre Lacazette & Aubameyang give Gunners win
Two goals in three second-half minutes give Arsenal victory over Everton and take them up to sixth in the Premier League.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/45538155

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 22:30 GMT   
IP:
3:9:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bank
Buckingham Palace: Man arrested over ’Taser’
A 38-year-old man was detained by security staff at the visitor entrance.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-45618883

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 12:00 GMT   
IP:
3:10:42016
Post by LDNnews: Cannon Street
Three great recipes for your Macmillan Coffee Morning
Macmillan’s fundraising coffee mornings are taking place at the end of the month and the charity has released some great recipe ideas.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16886287.three-great-recipes-for-your-macmillan-coffee-morning/?ref=rss

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 12:00 GMT   
IP:
3:11:42016
Post by LDNnews: St Pauls
Three great recipes for your Macmillan Coffee Morning
Macmillan’s fundraising coffee mornings are taking place at the end of the month and the charity has released some great recipe ideas.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16886292.three-great-recipes-for-your-macmillan-coffee-morning/?ref=rss

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 11:40 GMT   
IP:
3:12:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bethnal Green
Latest odds, head to head history, kick-off time, tickets for Saturday’s Emirates Stadium match
Latest odds, head to head history, kick-off time, tickets for Saturday’s Emirates Stadium match

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/arsenal-vs-everton-premier-league-2018-predictions-betting-tips-live-stream-tv-teams-preview-a3943281.html

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 23 Sep 2018 11:40 GMT   
IP:
3:13:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bermondsey
Latest odds, head to head history, kick-off time, tickets, team news for Saturday’s London Stadium derby
Latest odds, head to head history, kick-off time, tickets, team news for Saturday’s London Stadium derby

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/west-ham-v-chelsea-predictions-betting-tips-live-stream-tv-team-news-premier-league-201819-preview-a3943276.html

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 22 Sep 2018 20:30 GMT   
IP:
3:14:42016
Post by LDNnews: Bank
Chas and Dave: Chas Hodges dies aged 74
Chas Hodges was one half of the musical duo whose hits included Rabbit and Snooker Loopy.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-45613563

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 22 Sep 2018 10:40 GMT   
IP:
3:15:42016
Post by LDNnews: Cannon Street
Bulbs to plant this autumn
If you want lashings of spring and early summer colour, but fancy something more unusual from the standard daffodils and tulips which are abundant in garden centres, take a look at some of the more exotic bulbs to plant this autumn.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16894911.bulbs-to-plant-this-autumn/?ref=rss

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 22 Sep 2018 10:40 GMT   
IP:
3:16:42016
Post by LDNnews: St Pauls
Bulbs to plant this autumn
If you want lashings of spring and early summer colour, but fancy something more unusual from the standard daffodils and tulips which are abundant in garden centres, take a look at some of the more exotic bulbs to plant this autumn.

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/16894912.bulbs-to-plant-this-autumn/?ref=rss

VIEW THE WHITECHAPEL AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WHITECHAPEL AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE WHITECHAPEL AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE WHITECHAPEL AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE WHITECHAPEL AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Whitechapel

Whitechapel is a neighbourhood whose heart is Whitechapel Road itself, named for a small chapel of ease dedicated to St Mary.

By the late 1500s Whitechapel and the surrounding area had started becoming 'other half' of London. Located downwind of the genteel sections of west London which were to see the expansion of Westminster Abbey and construction of Buckingham Palace, it naturally attracted the more fragrant activities of the city, particularly tanneries, breweries, foundries (including the Whitechapel Bell Foundry which later cast Philadelphia's Liberty Bell and also Big Ben), slaughterhouses and, close by to the south, the gigantic Billingsgate fish market, famous in its day for the ornately foul language of the extremely Cockney fishwomen who worked there.

Population shifts from rural areas to London from the 1600s to the mid 1800s resulted in great numbers of more or less destitute people taking up residence amidst the industries and mercantile interests that had attracted them. By the 1840s Whitechapel, along with the enclaves of Wapping, Aldgate, Bethnal Green, Mile End, Limehouse and Stepney (collectively known today as the East End), had evolved, or devolved, into classic 'dickensian' London. Whitechapel Road itself was not particularly squalid through most of this period - it was the warren of small dark streets branching from it that contained the greatest suffering, filth and danger, especially Dorset St., Thrawl St., Berners St. (renamed Henriques St.), Wentworth St. and others.

In the Victorian era the base population of poor English country stock was swelled by immigrants from all over, particularly Irish and Jewish. 1888 saw the depredations of the Whitechapel Murderer, later known as 'Jack the Ripper'. In 1902, American author Jack London, looking to write a counterpart to Jacob Riis's seminal book How the Other Half Lives, donned ragged clothes and boarded in Whitechapel, detailing his experiences in The People of the Abyss. Riis had recently documented the astoundingly bad conditions in the leading city of the United States. Jack London, a socialist, thought it worthwhile to explore conditions in the leading city of the nation that had created modern capitalism. He concluded that English poverty was far rougher than the American variety. The juxtaposition of the poverty, homelessness, exploitive work conditions, prostitution, and infant mortality of Whitechapel and other East End locales with some of the greatest personal wealth the world has ever seen made it a focal point for leftist reformers of all kinds, from George Bernard Shaw, whose Fabian Society met regularly in Whitechapel, to Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, who boarded and led rallies in Whitechapel during his exile from Russia.

Whitechapel remained poor (and colourful) through the first half of the 20th Century, though somewhat less desperately so. It suffered great damage in the V2 German rocket attacks and the Blitz of World War II. Since then, Whitechapel has lost its notoriety, though it is still thoroughly working class. The Bangladeshis are the most visible migrant group there today and it is home to many aspiring artists and shoestring entrepreneurs.

Since the 1970s, Whitechapel and other nearby parts of East London have figured prominently in London's art scene. Probably the most prominent art venue is the Whitechapel Art Gallery, founded in 1901 and long an outpost of high culture in a poor neighbourhood. As the neighbourhood has gentrified, it has gained citywide, and even international, visibility and support.

Whitechapel, is a London Underground and London Overground station, on Whitechapel Road was opened in 1876 by the East London Railway on a line connecting Liverpool Street station in the City of London with destinations south of the River Thames. The station site was expanded in 1884, and again in 1902, to accommodate the services of the Metropolitan District Railway, a predecessor of the London Underground. The London Overground section of the station was closed between 2007 and 27 April 2010 for rebuilding, initially reopening for a preview service on 27 April 2010 with the full service starting on 23 May 2010.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
18 Folgate Street:   Dennis Severs' House in Folgate Street is a 'still-life drama' created by the previous owner as an 'historical imagination' of what life would have been like inside for a family of Huguenot silk weavers.
Al Ashraaf Secondary School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Aldgate:   Aldgate was a gateway through London Wall from the City of London to Whitechapel and the East End.
Aldgate East:   In a land east of Aldgate, lies the land of Aldgate East...
Aldgate Pump:   Aldgate Pump is a historic water pump, located at the junction where Aldgate meets Fenchurch Street and Leadenhall Street.
All Hallows-by-the-Tower:   All Hallows-by-the-Tower is the oldest church in London with a story involving Samuel Pepys, royalty and the foundation of Pennsylvania.
Altab Ali Park:   
Bevis Marks Synagogue:   Bevis Marks Synagogue is the oldest synagogue in the United Kingdom.
Boar’s Head Theatre:   The Boar’s Head Theatre was an inn-yard theatre in the Whitechapel area.
Canon Barnett Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Christ Church CofE School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Collingwood Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Columbia Market Nursery School:   Local authority nursery school (Nursery) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 5.
Columbia Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
David Game College:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 13 and 22. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
East India:   This is a children’s centre.
English Martyrs Roman Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Fenchurch Street:   Fenchurch Street railway station is a central London railway terminus in the southeastern corner of the City of London. It is one of the smallest railway termini in London but in terms of platforms, one of the most intensively operated.
Geffrye Museum:   Founded in 1914, the Geffrye Museum is a museum specialising in the history of the English domestic interior.
Goodman’s Fields Theatre:   Two 18th century theatres bearing the name Goodman’s Fields Theatre were located on Alie Street, Whitechapel.
Great Synagogue of London:   The Great Synagogue of London was, for centuries, the centre of Ashkenazi synagogue and Jewish life in London. It was destroyed during World War II, in the Blitz.
Green Spring Academy Shoreditch:   Academy converter (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 19. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Harry Gosling Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Holy Trinity, Minories:   Holy Trinity, Minories was a Church of England parish church outside the eastern boundaries of the City of London, but within the Liberties of the Tower of London.
Hoxton:   Hoxton is a district in the East End of London, immediately north of the financial district of the City of London.
Kobi Nazrul Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Little Oaks Sure Start Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Liverpool Street:   Liverpool Street station is a mainline railway station and connected London Underground station in the north eastern corner of the City of London.
London East Academy:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16.
London Metal Exchange:   The London Metal Exchange (LME) is the futures exchange with the world’s largest market in options and futures contracts on base and other metals.
Madani Secondary Girls’ School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18.
Montefiore Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
New City College:   Further education (16 plus) which accepts students between the ages of 14 and 99.
Osmani Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Petticoat Lane Market:   Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End.
Portsoken:   Portsoken is one of 25 wards in the City of London, each electing an alderman to the Court of Aldermen and commoners (the City equivalent of a councillor) elected to the Court of Common Council of the City of London Corporation.
Shoreditch:   Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. It is a built-up district located 2.3 miles (3.7 km) north east of Charing Cross.
Sir John Cass’s Foundation Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Spitalfields:   Spitalfields is near to Liverpool Street station and Brick Lane.
St Anne’s Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Augustine Papey:   St Augustine Papey was a mediaeval church in the City of London situated just south of London Wall.
St Botolph’s:   St. Botolph’s without Aldgate, located on Aldgate High Street, has existed for over a thousand years.
St Katharine Cree:   St Katharine Cree is a Church of England church on the north side of Leadenhall Street near Leadenhall Market.
St Matthias Church of England Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Monica’s Roman Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 11.
Stewart Headlam Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Swanlea School:   Community school (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Tenter Ground:   Tenter Ground harks back to the seventeenth century when this patch of land was surrounded by weavers’ houses and workshops and used to wash and stretch their fabrics on ’tenters’ to dry.
The Complete Works Independent School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 5 and 16.
Thomas Buxton Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Tower Gateway:   Tower Gateway is a Docklands Light Railway station near to the Tower of London.
Tower Hill:   Tower Hill is an elevated spot outside the Tower of London and just outside the limits of the City of London.
Tower of London:   In the late 1070s, William the Conqueror began to build a massive stone tower at the centre of his London fortress. Nothing like it had ever been seen before.
Toynbee Hall:   Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name.
Virginia Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Whitechapel:   Whitechapel is a neighbourhood whose heart is Whitechapel Road itself, named for a small chapel of ease dedicated to St Mary.
Workers’ Educational Association:   Further education (16 plus) which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 99.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
190 Bishopsgate:   A 1912 view of the City.
London in 1457:   Goulston Street is a thoroughfare running north-south from Wentworth Street to Whitechapel High Street.
Wentworth Street (1901):   Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
100 Bishopsgate · Academy Buildings, N1 · Adler Street, E1 · Alderman Stairs, E1W · Alderman Stairs, SE1 · Aldermans Walk, EC2M · Aldgate Bus Garage, EC3N · Aldgate High Street, EC3N · Aldgate, EC3N · Alie Street, E1 · America Square, EC3N · Angel Alley, E1 · Anning Street, EC2A · Appold Street, EC2A · Arcadia Court, E1 · Arnold Circus, E2 · Artillery Lane, E1 · Artillery Passage, E1 · Arts Quarter, E1 · Austin Street, E2 · Back Alley, EC3N · Back Church Lane, E1 · Back Mews, SE4 · Bacon Street, E1 · Bacon Street, E2 · Barnsley Street, E1 · Baroness Road, E2 · Basing House Yard, E2 · Bateman’s Row, EC2A · Batemans Row, EC2A · Batty Street, E1 · Bell Lane, E1 · Bethnal Green Road, E1 · Bevis Marks, EC3A · Billiter Square, EC3M · Billiter Street, EC3M · Bishops Square, E1 · Bishopsgate Arcade, EC2M · Bishopsgate, EC2M · Black Lion Yard, E1 · Blossom Street, E1 · Blue Anchor Yard, E1 · Boundary Passage, E1 · Boundary Street, E2 · Bowl Court, E1 · Boyd Street, E1 · Brady Street, E1 · Braham Street, E1 · Braithwaite Street, E1 · Brick Lane, E1 · Brick Lane, E2 · Brune House, E1 · Brune Street, E1 · Brushfield Street, E1 · Brushfield Street, EC2M · Buckhurst Street, E1 · Buckle Street, E1 · Burr Close, E1W · Burslem Street, E1 · Bury Street, EC3A · Buxton Street, E1 · Byward Street, EC3R · Calvert Avenue, E2 · Calvin Street, E1 · Cambridge Heath Road, E1 · Camomile Street, EC3A · Camperdown Street, E1 · Carlisle Avenue, EC3N · Cartwright Street, E1 · Casson Street E.1, E1 · Casson Street, E1 · Castlemain Street, E1 · Cavendish Court, EC3A · Celia Blairman House, E1 · Central House, E1 · Chamber Street, E1 · Chambord Street, E2 · Chance Street, E1 · Chapel Place, EC2A · Charlotte Road, EC2A · Cheshire Street, E2 · Chicksand Street, E1 · Chilton Street, E2 · Christian Street, E1 · Christina Street, EC2A · Cleeve Workshops, E2 · Clothworkers Hall, EC3R · Club Row, E1 · Club Row, E2 · Cobb Street, E1 · Code Street, E1 · College East, E1 · Collingwood Street, E1 · Columbia Road, E2 · Commercial St, E1 · Commercial Street, E1 · Coney Way, SW8 · Cooper?s Row, EC3N · Coopers Row, EC3N · Coppergate House, E1 · Corbet Place, E1 · Cottons Gardens, E2 · Court Street, E1 · Coverley Close, E1 · Crabtree Close, E2 · Creechurch Lane, EC3A · Cremer Business Centre, E2 · Cremer Street, E2 · Crescent, EC3N · Cresent, EC3N · Crispin Place, E1 · Crispin Street, E1 · Crofts Street, E1 · Crosswall, EC3N · Crutched Friars, EC3N · Cudworth Street, E1 · Cullum Street, EC3M · Curtain Place, EC2A · Curtain Road, EC2 · Curtain Road, EC2A · Curtan Road, EC2A · Cutler Street, E1 · Cutler Street, EC3A · Darling Row, E1 · Davenant Street, E1 · Deal Street, E1 · Dereham Place, EC2A · Devonshire Row, EC2M · Devonshire Square, E1 · Devonshire Square, EC2M · Diss Street, E2 · Dorset Street, E1 · Dray Walk, E1 · Drysdale Place, E2 · Drysdale Street, N1 · Dukes Place, EC3A · Dukes Place, EC3A · Dukes Place, EC3N · Dunloe Street, E2 · Dunster Court, EC3R · Durward Street, E1 · East Flank, SE18 · East Mount Street, E1 · East Smithfield, E1W · East Smithfield, EC3N · East Tenter Street, E1 · Ebor Street, E1 · Elder Street, E1 · Elwin Street, E2 · Enfield Cloisters, N1 · Exchange Arcade, EC2M · Exchange Square, EC2A · Exchange Square, EC2M · Ezra Street, E2 · Fairchild Place, EC2A · Fairchild Street, EC2A · Fairclough Street, E1 · Falkirk Street, N1 · Fanshaw Street, N1 · Fashion Street, E1 · Fenchurch Avenue, EC3M · Fenchurch Buildings, EC3M · Fenchurch Place, EC3M · Fenchurch Street, EC3M · Fieldgate Street, E1 · Flank Street, E1 · Fleur De Lis Street, E1 · Flower and Dean Street, E1 · Folgate Street, E1 · Forbes Street, E1 · Fordham Street, E1 · Fournier Street, E1 · French Place, E1 · Frying Pan Alley, E1 · Fulbourne Street, E1 · Garden Walk, EC2A · Gascoigne Place, E2 · Gatesborough Street, EC2A · Geffrye Court, N1 · Geffrye Street, E2 · George Street, E1 · Gibraltar Walk, E2 · Glassworks Studios, E2 · Golding Street, E1 · Goodman?s Yard, E1 · Goodmans Yard, E1 · Goring Street, EC3A · Gorsuch Place, E2 · Gosset Street, E2 · Goulston Street, E1 · Granary Road, E1 · Granby Street, E2 · Gravel Lane, E1 · Great Eastern Street, EC2A · Great St Helen’s, EC3A · Great St Helens, EC3A · Great Tower Street, EC3R · Greatorex Street, E1 · Greenfield Road, E1 · Grimsby Street, E2 · Gun Street, E1 · Gunthorpe Street, E1 · Hanbury Street, E1 · Hare Walk, N1 · Harp Lane, EC3R · Harrow Place, E1 · Hart Street, EC3R · Hassard Street, E2 · Haydon Street, E1 · Haydon Street, EC3N · Headlam Street, E1 · Hearn Street, EC2A · Hemming Street, E1 · Heneage Lane, EC3A · Heneage Street, E1 · Henriques Street, E1 · Hermitage Court, E1W · Hewett Street, EC2A · Holywell Centre, EC2A · Holywell Lane, EC2A · Hopetown Street, E1 · Horatio Street, E2 · Houndsditch, EC3A · Hoxton Square, N1 · Hoxton Street, N1 · Hunton Street, E1 · Ibex House, EC3N · India Street, EC3N · Irongate House, EC3A · Ivory House, E1W · Jewry Street, EC3N · Juliet House, N1 · Kerbela Street, E2 · Key Close, E1 · King John Court, EC2A · Kings Arms Court, E1 · Kingsland Road, E2 · Kirton Gardens, E2 · Knighten Street, E1W · Knighton Street, E1W · Lamb Street, E1 · Langdale Street, E1 · Leadenhall Place, EC3V · Leadenhall Street, EC3A · Leman Street, E1 · Leyden Street, E1 · Library Square, E1 · Ligonier Street, E2 · Lime Street, EC3M · Little Paternoster Row, E1 · Little Somerset Street, E1 · Lloyd?s Avenue, EC3N · Lloyds Avenue, EC3N · Lolesworth Close, E1 · London Fruit Exchange, E1 · London Street, EC3R · Long Street, E2 · Luke Street, EC2A · Mail Coach Yard, E2 · Mail Coach Yard, N1 · Manningtree Street, E1 · Mansell Street, E1 · Mansell Street, EC3N · Mark Lane, EC3R · Marlow Workshops, E2 · Merceron Street, E1 · Mews Street, E1W · Middlesex Street, E1 · Middlesex Street, EC3A · Mincing Lane, EC3R · Minories, EC3N · Minories, EC3N · Minster Court, EC3R · Minsters Pavement, EC3A · Mitre Avenue, E17 · Mitre Square, EC3A · Mitre Street, EC3A · Monmouth House, E1 · Monthope Road, E1 · More London Place, SE1 · Morgans Lane, SE1 · Mulberry Street, E1 · Munster Court, SW6 · Muscovy Street, EC3R · Myrdle Street, E1 · Nantes Passage, E1 · Nazrul Street, E2 · Nesham Street, E1W · New Goulston Street, E1 · New Inn Broadway, EC2A · New Inn Square, EC2A · New Inn Street, EC2A · New Inn Yard, EC2A · New London Street, EC3R · New North Place, EC2A · New Street, EC2M · North Tenter Street, E1 · Norton Folgate, E1 · Norton Folgate, EC2M · Old Castle Street, E1 · Old Montague Street, E1 · Old Nichol Street, E2 · Orton Street, E1W · Osborn Street, E1 · Osborne Street, E1 · Osbourne Street, E1 · Padbury Court, E2 · Parfett Street, E1 · Parliament Court, E1 · Pedley Street, E1 · Pelter Street, E2 · Pepys Street, EC3N · Pereira Street, E1 · Perseverance Works, E2 · Petty Wales, EC3N · Philchurch Place, E1 · Phipp Street, EC2A · Pier Head, E1W · Pinchin Street, E1 · Pindar Street, EC2A · Plough Yard, EC2A · Plumbers Row, E1 · Pomell Way, E1 · Ponler Street, E1 · Portsoken Street, E1 · Prescot Street, E1 · Primrose Street, EC2A · Princelet Street, E1 · Printing House Yard, E2 · Puma Court, E1 · Quaker Street, E1 · Quilter Street, E2 · Railway Arches, EC2A · Railway Arches, EC3N · Ravenscroft Street, E2 · Ravey Street, EC2A · Redchurch Street, E2 · Regal Close, E1 · Regan Way, N1 · Rhoda Street, E2 · Rivington Place, EC2A · Rivington Street, EC2A · Rochelle Street, E2 · Romford Street, E1 · Rose Court, E1 · Royal Mint Court, EC3N · Royal Mint Place, E1 · Royal Mint Street, E1 · Rufus Street, N1 · Saint Dunstan?s Hill, EC3R · Saint Katharine’s Way, E1W · Saint Katherine’s Way, E1W · Saint Mary Axe, EC3A · Sampson Street, E1W · Sandy’s Row, E1 · Sandys Row, E1 · Saracen?s Head Yard, EC3N · Savage Gardens, EC3N · Scarborough Street, E1 · Scawfell Street, E2 · Sclater Street, E1 · Scott Street, E1 · Scrutton Street, EC2A · Seething Lane, EC3N · Selby Street, E1 · Settles Street, E1 · Shacklewell Street, E2 · Shenfield Street, N1 · Shipton Street, E2 · Shoreditch High Street, E1 · Shoreditch High Street, E8 · Shoreditch High Street, EC1V · Shoreditch High Street, EC2A · Shorter Street, E1 · Shorter Street, EC3N · Silwex House, E1 · Snowden Street, EC2A · South Tenter Street, E1 · Spellman Street, E1 · Spelman House, E1 · Spelman Street, E1 · Spital Square, E1 · Spital Street, E1 · Spring Walk, E1 · St Anthony’s Close, E1W · St Botolph Street, EC3A · St Clare House, EC3N · St Clare Street, EC3N · St Helen?s Place, EC3A · St Helen’s Place, EC3A · St James’s Passage, EC3A · St James’s Place, EC3A · St Katharines Way, E1W · St Katharine’s Way, E1W · St Mark Street, E1 · St Mary Axe, EC3A · St. Botolph Street, EC3A · Stamp Place, E2 · Stanway Street, N1 · Staple Hall, EC3A · Star Place, E1W · Stepney Green Court, E1 · Stockholm Way, E1W · Stone House Court, EC3A · Stoney Lane, E1 · Stothard Place, EC2M · Strouts Place, E2 · Strype Street, E1 · Stutfield Street, E1 · Sugar Quay Walk, EC3N · Sugar Quay Walk, SE1 · Sun Street Passage, EC2A · Sun Street Passage, EC2M · Sunbury Workshops, E2 · Surma Close, E1 · Swanfield Street, E2 · Tea Building, E1 · Tent Street, E1 · Tenter Ground, E1 · The Arcade, EC2M · The Arches, EC2A · The Queen?s Steps, EC3N · The Queen’s Steps, EC3N · Thomas More Square, E1W · Thomas More Street, E1W · Thrawl Street, E1 · Three Colts Corner, E2 · Three Colts Lane, E1 · Three Colts Lane, E2 · Tower Bridge Approach, E1W · Tower Bridge Approach, EC3N · Tower Bridge, E1W · Tower Hill Terrace, EC3N · Tower Hill, EC3N · Tower Place West, EC3R · Tower Place, EC3R · Tower Walk, E1W · Toynbee Street, E1 · Trahorn Close, E1 · Trinity Square, EC3N · Turville Street, E2 · Tyssen Street, N1 · Umberston Street, E1 · Undershaft, EC2N · Undershaft, EC3A · Undershaft, EC3P · Underwood Road, E1 · Union Central, E2 · Union Walk, E2 · Vallance Road, E1 · Vaughan Way, E1W · Victoria Avenue, EC2M · Victoria Yard, E1 · Vine Court, E1 · Vine Street, EC3N · Virginia Road, E2 · Waterson Street, E2 · Weaver Street, E1 · Wentworth Street, E1 · West Tenter Street, E1 · Wheler Street, E1 · Whitby Street, E1 · White Church Lane, E1 · White Kennet Street, E1 · White Kennett Street, E1 · White Kennett Street, EC3A · Whitechapel High Street, E1 · Whitechapel Market, E1 · Whitechapel Road, E1 · Whitechapel Street, E1 · Whites Row, E1 · Whittington Avenue, EC3A · Wicker Street, E1 · Widegate Street, E1 · Wilkes Street, E1 · Wilks Place, N1 · Winthrop Street, E1 · Wodeham Gardens, E1 · Woodseer Street, E1 · Wormwood Street, EC2N · Worship Mews, EC2A · Wrestlers Court, EC3A · Yorkton Street, E2 ·
Print-friendly version of this page

Links

Shoreditch High Street
Facebook Page
Aldgate
Facebook Page
Aldgate East
Facebook Page
Tower Hill
Facebook Page
Liverpool Street
Facebook Page
Monument
Facebook Page
Tower Gateway
Facebook Page
Hidden London
Histor­ically inclined look at the capital’s obscure attractions
Edith’s Streets
A wander through London, street by street
Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.
Time Out
Listings magazine

Maps


Central London, north east (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north east.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Cruchley's New Plan of London (1848) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cruchley's New Plan of London Shewing all the new and intended improvements to the Present Time. - Cruchley's Superior Map of London, with references to upwards of 500 Streets, Squares, Public Places & C. improved to 1848: with a compendium of all Place of Public Amusements also shewing the Railways & Stations.
G. F. Cruchley

Cary's New And Accurate Plan of London and Westminster (1818) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cary's map provides a detailed view of London. With print date of 1 January 1818, Cary's map has 27 panels arranged in 3 rows of 9 panels, each measuring approximately 6 1/2 by 10 5/8 inches. The complete map measures 32 1/8 by 59 1/2 inches. Digitising this map has involved aligning the panels into one contiguous map.
John Cary

John Rocque Map of London (1762) FREE DOWNLOAD
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers central London at a reduced level of detail compared with his 1745-6 map.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1843) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured.
Chapman and Hall, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1836) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Insets: A view of the Tower from London Bridge -- A view of London from Copenhagen Fields. Includes views of facades of 25 structures "A comparison of the principal buildings of London."
Chapman and Hall, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
1 



COPYRIGHT TERMS:
Unless a source is explicitedly stated, text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. Articles may be a remixes of various Wikipedia articles plus work by the website authors - original Wikipedia source can generally be accessed under the same name as the main title. This does not affect its Creative Commons attribution.

Maps upon this website are in the public domain because they are mechanical scans of public domain originals, or - from the available evidence - are so similar to such a scan or photocopy that no copyright protection can be expected to arise. The originals themselves are in public domain for the following reason:
Public domain Maps used are in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighbouring rights.

This tag is designed for use where there may be a need to assert that any enhancements (eg brightness, contrast, colour-matching, sharpening) are in themselves insufficiently creative to generate a new copyright. It can be used where it is unknown whether any enhancements have been made, as well as when the enhancements are clear but insufficient. For usage, see Commons:When to use the PD-scan tag.