Cape Nursery

Agricultural land, existed between the 1760s and 1861

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Agricultural land · The Underground Map · W14 ·
August
2
2015

The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.


By the early 19th century the north side and west side of Shepherd’s Bush Common were lined with terraces but the southern side remained open land. The lands here were called Charecroft’s - part of the charity estates belonging to the parish.

A Little History Of British Gardening by Jenny Uglow reported that during 1760, James Lee and Lewis Kennedy "started a great nursery in Shepherd’s Bush".

In 1797 the Cape Nursery was reported by a botanist to be owned by two gentleman called Middlemist and Wood, and supplying rare plants: "many novelties from the North African flora were exhibited, the proprietor having resided there during many years"

The London Gazette of 1834 notes: "His Majesty’s Commissioners authorised to act under a Fiat in Bankruptcy, bearing date the 31st day of January 1834, awarded and issued forth against John Middlemist, of Cape’s Nursery, Shepherds-Bush, in the County of Middlesex, Nurseryman, Seedsman, Dealer and Cuapman (now or late. Partner with Alexander Wood, late of the same place, Nurseryman)."

In "The Jurist" magazine of 1861, one William Plimley was listed as bankrupt, but marked as occupier - the nursery itself was classed there as a "market garden".

While it was still marked on a 1860 map, by 1870 it had disappeared.


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