St Paul’s

Underground station

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Underground station · City of London · EC2V ·
November
2
2013

St Paul's is a London Underground station located in the City of London financial district which takes its name from the nearby St Paul's Cathedral.

St Paul's Cathedral
The station was opened by the Central London Railway (CLR) on 30 July 1900 with the name Post Office, after the headquarters of the General Post Office on St Martin's Le Grand. The name Post Office was possibly chosen instead of the more obvious St Paul's to differentiate it from a South Eastern Railway (SER) station of that name (which today is called Blackfriars).

The station entrance was originally located on the north side of Newgate Street, on the west side of the junction with King Edward Street, but was moved to the east when the station was modernised in the 1930s with an underground ticket hall and escalators. A modern ventilation shaft in the centre of the traffic island at the junction indicates the location of the original lift shafts. When the SER station called St Paul's was renamed Blackfriars in 1937, the Underground station called Post Office took the name St Paul's, which it has kept ever since.

At the end of the 19th century, Newgate Street was a narrow road with some of its mediaeval character remaining. To reduce land purchase and compensation payments, the CLR routed its tunnels directly under public roads. At St Paul's the narrowness of the road required the tunnels to be placed one above the other with the westbound tunnel uppermost. The lifts originally operated to a level between the two platforms, with stairs up or down to the platforms as necessary. A high-level access passage way is visible at the lowest level leading to the disused lift lobby.

During the Second World War the electricity grid control room for London and Southeast England was housed below ground in the lift shaft.

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St Paul's Cathedral
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LDNnews
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
All Hallows, Honey Lane was parish church in the City of London.
All Hallows, Honey Lane was parish church in the City of London.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=2625

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City of London

The City of London constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the conurbation has since grown far beyond its borders.

As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of Greater London, though it remains a notable part of central London. It holds city status in its own right and is also a separate ceremonial county.

It is widely referred to as 'The City' (often written on maps as City and differentiated from the phrase 'the city of London') or 'the Square Mile' as it is 1.12 square miles in area. These terms are also often used as metonyms for the United Kingdom's financial services industry, which continues a notable history of being largely based in the City.

The local authority for the City, the City of London Corporation, is unique in the UK and has some unusual responsibilities for a local council, such as being the police authority. It also has responsibilities and ownerships beyond the City's boundaries. The Corporation is headed by the Lord Mayor of the City of London, an office separate from (and much older than) the Mayor of London.

The City is a major business and financial centre, ranking as the world's leading centre of global finance. Throughout the 19th century, the City was the world's primary business centre, and continues to be a major meeting point for businesses.

The City had a resident population of about 7000 in 2011 but over 300,000 people commute to it and work there, mainly in the financial services sector. The legal profession forms a major component of the northern and western sides of the City - especially in the Temple and Chancery Lane areas where the Inns of Court are located, of which two—Inner Temple and Middle Temple - fall within the City of London boundary.
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