Lea Bridge

Rail station, existing between the 1840s and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
3.233.239.20 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Rail station · Lea Bridge · E10 ·
JUNE
12
2017

Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area separating the London Borough of Hackney from the London Borough of Waltham Forest.

The Princess of Wales, Lea Bridge Road. Taken from the south side of Lea Bridge. 11 October 2005.
Credit: Fin Fahey
In 1582 Mill Fields Lane ran from Clapton to Jeremy’s Ferry in the Leyton Marshes. At the same spot a timber bridge was built in 1745, and the road became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollgate at the Clapton end. A toll house was built on the west bank of the river in 1757, and the bridge rebuilt in iron in 1820–1. Tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives ready access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park, which stretches for about 26 miles on both banks of the river. Next to the south side of the bridge are two public houses, the "Princess of Wales" and "The Ship Aground". To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and beyond Leyton Marsh to the north are the Walthamstow Marshes and Nature Reserve. Below the bridge, the river flows over the Middlesex Filter Beds Weir, marking the boundary with Leyton and providing the supply for the former East London Waterworks Company.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the corresponding Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. The Lee Navigation continues south in an artificial channel known as ’Hackney Cut’, to the next lock at Old Ford (about 1.7 miles), where the natural channel rejoins the Navigation after its 2 miles meander towards Leyton.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the platforms.

The station closed on 8 July 1985 but after service changes, reopened in May 2016.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

The Princess of Wales, Lea Bridge Road. Taken from the south side of Lea Bridge. 11 October 2005.
Fin Fahey

THE STREETS OF LEA BRIDGE
Fairways Business Park, E10 Fairways Business Park is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.
Lammas Road, E10 Lammas Road is one of the streets of London in the E10 postal area.



Jan
Jan   
Added: 15 Mar 2018 09:39 GMT   
IP: 92.30.46.73
2:1:709
Post by Jan: Kerbela Street, E2

My grandparents lived in Kerbela Street many years ago when they were terraced houses. My memory of the street is one long street with these strange wrought iron things outside - which I now know as boot scrapers. The house inside was fairly large, but I was a child. Loo was outside. Shame they knocked the terraces down and build a huge housing estate, but that?s progress I suppose. Does anyone know the origin of the name Kerbela?

N Rogers
N Rogers   
Added: 6 Dec 2017 12:18 GMT   
IP: 77.102.112.102
2:2:709
Post by N Rogers: Coleraine Works, N17

Coleraine Works was the informal name given to a small industrial building – just to the right of the photo shown – on the corner of Poynton Road and Wycombe Road.

This last housed a printer and has been empty for several years as the council refuse to let it pass into non-commercial use.

Sandy Tarrant
Sandy Tarrant   
Added: 16 Nov 2017 06:03 GMT   
IP: 60.225.230.107
2:3:709
Post by Sandy Tarrant: Monier Road, E3

My grandparents, James Isaac and Mary Ann Johnson ran a grocer’s shop at 122 Monier Road, Bow from the early 1900s to about 1935 or so.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 4 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:4:709
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
William Morris Close is named after the famous artist.
William Morris Close is named after the famous artist.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=65428

VIEW THE LEA BRIDGE AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE LEA BRIDGE AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE LEA BRIDGE AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE LEA BRIDGE AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE LEA BRIDGE AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Lea Bridge

Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area separating the London Borough of Hackney from the London Borough of Waltham Forest.

In 1582 Mill Fields Lane ran from Clapton to Jeremy’s Ferry in the Leyton Marshes. At the same spot a timber bridge was built in 1745, and the road became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollgate at the Clapton end. A toll house was built on the west bank of the river in 1757, and the bridge rebuilt in iron in 1820–1. Tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives ready access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park, which stretches for about 26 miles on both banks of the river. Next to the south side of the bridge are two public houses, the "Princess of Wales" and "The Ship Aground". To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and beyond Leyton Marsh to the north are the Walthamstow Marshes and Nature Reserve. Below the bridge, the river flows over the Middlesex Filter Beds Weir, marking the boundary with Leyton and providing the supply for the former East London Waterworks Company.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the corresponding Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. The Lee Navigation continues south in an artificial channel known as ’Hackney Cut’, to the next lock at Old Ford (about 1.7 miles), where the natural channel rejoins the Navigation after its 2 miles meander towards Leyton.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the platforms.

The station closed on 8 July 1985 but after service changes, reopened in May 2016.
Print-friendly version of this page