Chalfont & Latimer

Underground station, existing between 1889 and now

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34.204.203.142 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Underground station · Chalfont & Latimer · HP7 ·
September
29
2017

Chalfont and Latimer station is on the Metropolitan line.


It is the junction between services to Amersham and Chesham. It is also on the Chiltern Railways line to Aylesbury. The station serves all three of the Chalfonts — Chalfont St Giles, Chalfont St Peter and, the nearest, Little Chalfont.

Little Chalfont is situated in the county of Buckinghamshire, on the edge of the Chiltern Hills and about 50 kilometres from central London.

The Metropolitan Railway reached Little Chalfont in 1889. However the village didn’t really develop until the 1920s when land was released for housing to become part of, as Sir John Betjeman styled it: Metroland. The present population is around 5000. The station is now served by London Transport Metropolitan line and by Chiltern Railways resulting in excellent transport to and from London; Marylebone station can be reached in little over 30 minutes.

The village has a post office and a building society as well as a pharmacy, a small supermarket and about 30 other shops. There are two dental practices, a doctors surgery and an optician.

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THE STREETS OF CHALFONT & LATIMER
Chalfont Station Road, HP6 Chalfont Station Road is a road in the HP6 postcode area
Russell Close, HP6 Russell Close is a road in the HP6 postcode area



VIEW THE CHALFONT & LATIMER AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALFONT & LATIMER AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALFONT & LATIMER AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALFONT & LATIMER AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE CHALFONT & LATIMER AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Chalfont & Latimer

Chalfont and Latimer station is on the Metropolitan line.

It is the junction between services to Amersham and Chesham. It is also on the Chiltern Railways line to Aylesbury. The station serves all three of the Chalfonts — Chalfont St Giles, Chalfont St Peter and, the nearest, Little Chalfont.

Little Chalfont is situated in the county of Buckinghamshire, on the edge of the Chiltern Hills and about 50 kilometres from central London.

The Metropolitan Railway reached Little Chalfont in 1889. However the village didn’t really develop until the 1920s when land was released for housing to become part of, as Sir John Betjeman styled it: Metroland. The present population is around 5000. The station is now served by London Transport Metropolitan line and by Chiltern Railways resulting in excellent transport to and from London; Marylebone station can be reached in little over 30 minutes.

The village has a post office and a building society as well as a pharmacy, a small supermarket and about 30 other shops. There are two dental practices, a doctors surgery and an optician.
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