Thomas Wall Park

Park in/near Morden, existing until now

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Park · Morden · SM4 ·
FEBRUARY
27
2018





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User unknown/public domain


Karen packham
Karen packham   
Added: 31 Mar 2018 16:47 GMT   
IP: 5.68.107.4
2:1:7331
Post by Karen packham: Kingscroft Road, SM7

We grew up in number 27 , it was a great road to live in, so much freedom. We all played in the road as there were very few cars. We explored the fields and woods at the top of the road for hours and only went home when our dad whistled us. Our parents were given the council house in 1963 and worked very hard to make it a lovely family home. Mum and dad were Min and Den, the house is named ?Minden?. We have fabulous happy memories of the house, the road, and all the great neighbours and friends that lived in Kingscroft Road, Woodmansterne.

Dodie Roome
Dodie Roome   
Added: 21 Nov 2017 19:03 GMT   
IP: 198.242.211.102
2:2:7331
Post by Dodie Roome: Kenwyn Road, SW20

I don’t come from Kenwyn Road (I live in the United States) but my grandmother, Winifred Mary Print grew up on Kenwyn in the early 1900’s. Her father Israel Print was a Veterinary Surgeon in the area. His business was the Veterinary Infirmary & Shoeing Forge, 96 Wurtemberg Street, Clapham. and New Road Balham. I wonder if there are any Prints around Clapham today?



VIEW THE MORDEN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE MORDEN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE MORDEN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE MORDEN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE MORDEN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Morden

Morden is the southern terminus of the Northern Line.

Morden gets its name either from the Saxon words "Mawr" (high) and Don (a hill), or possibly "The Den on the Moor".

Human activity in Morden dates back to the prehistoric period when Celtic tribes are known to have occupied areas around Wimbledon, London, but the first significant development in Morden was the construction of the Roman road called Stane Street from Chichester to London.

The route of Stane Street through Morden followed the current A24, London Road up Stonecot Hill from the south west crossing Morden Park to the west of the current dual carriageway road and passing through the pitch and putt golf course and the grounds of St Lawrence’s Church. The road then descended the other side of the hill towards the town centre passing west of the Underground station and crossing the north corner of Morden Hall Park heading in the direction of Colliers Wood and Tooting. Small Roman artefacts, mainly coins and pottery, have been found at various locations within the area although there is no evidence of any settlement.

Ethelstan the Etheling, son of Ethelred the Unready, left "land at Mordune" to the abbey of Christ and St. Peter in his will of 1015, which became the site of the first Saxon parish church of St Lawrence. Later in the 11th century Morden is mentioned in the Domesday Book when it belonged to Westminster Abbey and just 14 people lived in the area.
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