Charing Cross

Underground station, existing between 1864 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
18.206.76.41 
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302020Fullscreen map
Underground station · Charing Cross · WC2N ·
August
4
2013

Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square in central London. It gives its name to several local landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station, one of the main London rail termini.

Charing Cross Northern Line platform
Credit: Mikegr
Charing Cross is named after the now demolished Eleanor cross that stood there, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. It was where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

It was one of twelve places where Eleanor's coffin rested overnight during the funeral procession from Lincolnshire to her final resting-place at Westminster. At each of these, Edward erected an Eleanor cross, of which only three now remain.

The original site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I. A Victorian replacement, in different style from the original, was later erected a short distance to the east outside the railway station.

Formerly, until 1931, Charing Cross also referred to the part of what is now Whitehall lying between Great Scotland Yard and Trafalgar Square. At least one property retains a Charing Cross postal address: Drummonds Bank, on the corner of Whitehall and The Mall, which is designated 49 Charing Cross (not to be confused with the separate Charing Cross Road).

Since the second half of the 18th century, Charing Cross has been seen by some as the exact centre of London, being the main point used for measuring distances from London.

The railway station opened in 1864, fronted on the Strand with the Charing Cross Hotel. The original station building was built on the site of the Hungerford Market by the South Eastern Railway, designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, with a single span wrought iron roof arching over the six platforms on its relatively cramped site.

Charing Cross tube station has entrances located in Trafalgar Square and The Strand. The station is served by the Northern and Bakerloo lines, originally separate tube stations called Strand and Trafalgar Square, and provides an interchange with the National Rail network. The station was served by the Jubilee Line between 1979 and 1999, acting as the southern terminus of the line during that period.



Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence

xxx

Charing Cross Northern Line platform
Mikegr

THE STREETS OF CHARING CROSS
C1 Mint Business Park, E16 A street within the E16 postcode
Cannon Street, WC2N Cannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Charing Cross, SW1A Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma.
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Dn, SE1 A street within the postcode
Elmhurstreet Villas, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Embankment Place, WC2N Embankment Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Fullwood’s Mews, N1 A street within the 77381 postcode
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Hop Gardens, WC2N Hop Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
John Sessions Square, E1 A street within the postcode
London Borough Of Hackney, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
London Borough Of Southwark, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Lyndhurstreet Grove, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
New Row, WC2N New Row is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Northumberland Avenue, SW1A Northumberland Avenue is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. The road was built on the site of Northumberland House and on part of the parallel Northumberland Street.
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland.
Pelican Estate, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Spring Gardens, SW1A Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace.
St. James’s Drive, SW12 A street within the 78257 postcode
St. Kilda’s Road, N16 A street within the N16 postcode
St. Thomas’s Square, E9 A street within the 01938 postcode
Studio 5, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
The Arches, WC2N The Arches is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Gallery, E20 The Gallery is a road in the E20 postcode area
The National Gallery, WC2N The National Gallery is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Thunderer Walk, SE18 A street within the postcode
Trafalgar Square, SW1Y Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Warwick House Street, SW1Y Warwick House Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Westreet Drive, SW16 A street within the SW16 postcode
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site.



 

Charing Cross

Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square in central London. It gives its name to several local landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station, one of the main London rail termini.

Charing Cross is named after the now demolished Eleanor cross that stood there, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. It was where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

It was one of twelve places where Eleanor's coffin rested overnight during the funeral procession from Lincolnshire to her final resting-place at Westminster. At each of these, Edward erected an Eleanor cross, of which only three now remain.

The original site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I. A Victorian replacement, in different style from the original, was later erected a short distance to the east outside the railway station.

Formerly, until 1931, Charing Cross also referred to the part of what is now Whitehall lying between Great Scotland Yard and Trafalgar Square. At least one property retains a Charing Cross postal address: Drummonds Bank, on the corner of Whitehall and The Mall, which is designated 49 Charing Cross (not to be confused with the separate Charing Cross Road).

Since the second half of the 18th century, Charing Cross has been seen by some as the exact centre of London, being the main point used for measuring distances from London.

The railway station opened in 1864, fronted on the Strand with the Charing Cross Hotel. The original station building was built on the site of the Hungerford Market by the South Eastern Railway, designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, with a single span wrought iron roof arching over the six platforms on its relatively cramped site.

Charing Cross tube station has entrances located in Trafalgar Square and The Strand. The station is served by the Northern and Bakerloo lines, originally separate tube stations called Strand and Trafalgar Square, and provides an interchange with the National Rail network. The station was served by the Jubilee Line between 1979 and 1999, acting as the southern terminus of the line during that period.

Print-friendly version of this page