Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability

Hospital in/near Southfields, existing between 1863 and now

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Hospital · Southfields · SW15 ·
July
5
2018

The Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability is located in London Borough of Wandsworth.


The Royal Hospital is an independent medical charity that provides rehabilitation and long term care to people with complex neurological disabilities caused by damage to the brain or other parts of the nervous system. This damage is often caused by traffic accidents and progressive neurological conditions such as Huntington’s disease and multiple sclerosis. It is one of the 200 largest UK charitable organisations ranked by annual expenditure.

The Hospital was established in July 1854 at a meeting held at the Mansion House, chaired by the Lord Mayor of London. The hospital’s founder, Andrew Reed, had a record as a practical philanthropist, having previously set up four other charities, and Charles Dickens, the celebrated author, was one of the first high-profile figures to show his support by helping Reed raise funds for it.

The RHN was originally known as the Hospital for Incurables. It was based in a converted workhouse in Carshalton, Surrey, but as demand for its services grew, larger premises were required, and in 1857 it moved to a more spacious house in Putney. Just a few years later, even more space was needed and so in 1863 the hospital relocated to its permanent home, Melrose Hall on West Hill, in Putney.

Melrose Hall had originally been designed for John Anthony Rucker by the architect Jesse Gibson. It came with 24 acres of land on which, until the 1960s, the hospital ran a working farm, supplying fresh produce for patients’ meals. The Hall also had extensive gardens, parts of which had been landscaped by Capability Brown.

In 1917, the hospital changed its name to the Royal Hospital and Home for Incurables, receiving its Royal Charter two years later. The hospital’s name changed a further two times – once in 1988, when it became the Royal Hospital and Home, Putney, and again, in 1995, to the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability - a name that better reflected its work.


Main source: Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability
Further citations and sources


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http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2474722
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2474722


Dodie Roome
Dodie Roome   
Added: 21 Nov 2017 19:03 GMT   
IP: 198.242.211.102
2:1:7621
Post by Dodie Roome: Kenwyn Road, SW20

I don’t come from Kenwyn Road (I live in the United States) but my grandmother, Winifred Mary Print grew up on Kenwyn in the early 1900’s. Her father Israel Print was a Veterinary Surgeon in the area. His business was the Veterinary Infirmary & Shoeing Forge, 96 Wurtemberg Street, Clapham. and New Road Balham. I wonder if there are any Prints around Clapham today?



Patricia Neafsey
Patricia Neafsey   
Added: 4 Sep 2017 15:55 GMT   
IP: 72.200.171.94
2:2:7621
Post by Patricia Neafsey: Fishers Lane, W4

My ancestors (Dady) lived in Myrtle Cottage, Fishers Lane in 1900 or so. Do you have any information? Was it associated with a manor house?

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Southfields

Southfields is mainly residential, historically a part of Wandsworth, and is divided between SW18 and SW19 postcode areas.

Southfields takes its name from the old manorial system, where one field was known as the South Field of the manor of Dunsford. The equivalent North Field lay between West Hill and the River Thames and survives in the short road named Northfields which runs to the east of Wandsworth Park.

Until the late 19th century, Southfields was still fields, situated between the more developed villages of Wimbledon and Putney.

After the District & London & South Western Railway from Wimbledon to Putney Bridge opened in June 1889, the area started to urbanise, with the first school opening a year later on Merton Road.

The main residential areas of Southfields are the "Southfields Triangle" and "The Grid".

The "Southfields Triangle" is a series of roads and streets that (somewhat) resemble a triangle. It covers the area from Standen Road in the south to Granville Road in the north. In 1904, the Frame Foods babyfood company opened its factory in Standen Road in a building with a distinctive art nouveau style. The building has been converted into luxury flats.

"The Grid" is a series of parallel roads run from Replingham Road, in the north to Revelstoke Road, in the south. "The Grid" consists almost entirely of Edwardian terrace houses, some of which have been converted into flats. A restrictive covenant at one time prevented any pubs from being built in the Southfields "Grid" area.
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