Stonenest Street, N4

Road in/near Finsbury Park, existing between 1981 and now

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Road · Finsbury Park · N4 · Contributed by The Underground Map
FEBRUARY
17
2018


This is a street in the N4 postcode area



ADD A STORY TO STONENEST STREET
VIEW THE FINSBURY PARK AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE FINSBURY PARK AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE FINSBURY PARK AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE FINSBURY PARK AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE FINSBURY PARK AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Finsbury Park

Finsbury Park is an area in north London which grew up around an important railway interchange near the borders of the London Boroughs of Islington, Haringey and Hackney.

Finsbury Park is not to be confused with [Finsbury">Finsbury] which is 5.3 km further south in the London Borough of Islington.

The area is centred on Finsbury Park station, a major bus, rail and tube interchange near the southern end of the public park of the same name.

The surrounding area has a cosmopolitan feel, as reflected by the wide variety of shops and establishments on Seven Sisters Road, Blackstock Road and Stroud Green Road. The North London Central Mosque (formerly the Finsbury Park Mosque), which drew attention for extremist activity before a change in leadership in 2003, is located here. Arsenal Football Club’s Emirates Stadium is nearby.

Finsbury Park station first opened on 1 July 1861 and was originally named Seven Sisters Road (Holloway). It is on the route of the East Coast Main Line from King’s Cross to the north of England and Scotland. The southern section of this was built in stages during the 1840s and early 1850s by the Great Northern Railway (GNR). Tracks were first laid through Finsbury Park in 1850 to the GNR’s temporary terminus at Maiden Lane just north of the permanent terminus at King’s Cross (which opened in 1852).

Soon after the first station opened, the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway (EH&LR) began construction of a line from Finsbury Park to Edgware. The GNR took over the EH&LR shortly before its opening on 22 August 1867. The station was given its current name Finsbury Park on 15 November 1869.

The Great Northern & City Railway (GN&CR) was an underground railway planned to provide a tunnel link between Finsbury Park and Moorgate in the City of London as an alternative London terminus for GNR trains. The tunnels were constructed with a large diameter to accommodate this service but a dispute between the two companies prevented the GN&CR connecting its tunnels to the GNR platforms. The GN&CR tunnels, instead, terminated beneath the main line station without a connection to the surface and the line operated as a shuttle between Finsbury Park and Moorgate. This line opened on 14 February 1904.

The Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR) (now London Underground’s Piccadilly line) opened on 15 December 1906 between Finsbury Park and Hammersmith in west London. The tube railway originated as the Great Northern and Strand Railway (GN&SR) in 1897 and was initially supported by the GNR as a means of relieving congestion on its main line into King’s Cross by constructing a tube line under the GNR’s tracks from Alexandra Palace to King’s Cross and then to the Strand. The GN&SR was taken over in 1901 by a consortium led by Charles Yerkes before any work had been carried out and the section north of Finsbury Park was cancelled. The GN&SR was merged with the Brompton and Piccadilly Circus Railway to form the GNP&BR. It was constructed with the smaller-diameter tube tunnels common to other underground railways being constructed in London at that time. Its platforms were constructed by the GNR parallel with the GN&CR’s platforms beneath the main line station. The Piccadilly Line was later extended northwards.

London Underground had for many years been planning a new route across central London to relieve pressure on the central sections of the Piccadilly and Northern lines. In the early 1960s the plans were consolidated into a single plan for the Victoria line. The route of the new line was designed to provide the maximum number of interchanges with other Underground and British Rail lines as possible, and Finsbury Park was an ideal candidate for this. The first section of the Victoria line, including Finsbury Park, opened between Walthamstow Central and Highbury & Islington on 1 September 1968.

OTHER LOCATIONS NEAR HERE
Albert Road · Almington Street · Ambler Primary School and Children’s Centre · Andover Road · Arts and Media School Islington · Beis Chinuch Lebonos Girls School · Biggerstaff Street · Blackstone Road · Bracey Street · Bridgemount Mews · Briset Way · Brownswood Road · Campbell Road · Carew Close · Carlisle Road · Carlton Road · Castleview Close · Chapman Place · Charteris Road · Christ The King RC Primary School · Citizen Road · Citizen Road · Colthurst Crescent · Connaught Road · Durham Road · Elyne Road · Finsbury Gate · Finsbury Park · Goodchild Road · Hanley Road · Hatley Road · Heathville Road · Heron Drive · Holly Park Methodist Church · Holly Park · Hornsey Road Childrens Centre · Isledon Road · Kayani Avenue · Kinloch Street · Lordship Road · Lorne Road · Marquis Road · Marriott Road · Medina Road · Monsell Road · Montem Primary School · Montem Street · Mount Pleasant Crescent · Mount Pleasant Villas · New River Way · Newington Barrow Way · Newnton Close · Newnton Close · North Islington Nursery School · Ossian Road · Pakeman Primary School · Parkwood Primary School · Playford Road · Pooles Park Primary School · Prah Road · Princes Close · Princess Crescent · Ridge Road · Rixon Street · Romilly Road · Saint Thomas’s Road · Shaftesbury Road · Sidings Mews · Somerfield Road · St Aidan’s Voluntary Controlled Primary School · Stapleton Hall Road · Stroud Green Primary School · The Grove · The Stapleton Tavern · Thistlewood Close · Thorpedale Road · Tollington Place · Towncourt Path · Victoria Terrace · Wesley Close · Wilberforce Road · Woodberry Down Children’s Centre · Yonge Park ·
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Links

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Maps


John Rocque Map of Hampstead (1762).
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map of Hampstead covers an area stretching from the edge in the northwest of present-day Dollis Hill to Islington in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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