Dollis Farm

Farm in/near Mill Hill East, existed between 1788 and the 1930s

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Farm · Mill Hill East · NW7 ·
September
22
2018

Dollis Farm was on the west side of Holders Hill Road near the junction which is now Holders Hill Circus.


Two roads ran north of Hendon, Ashley Lane (which now runs through the back of Hendon Golf Course) and Holders Hill Road. Much of the land was held by All Souls College in 1597.

Dollis Farm was situated close to where Holders Circus is today on the western side of Holders Hill Road. Jeremy Bentham used the farm as a retreat and rented rooms there from 1788 onwards.

The farm existed until the death of the last farmer, Thomas Whiting, in 1930.


Main source: Holders Hill - barnet.gov.uk
Further citations and sources


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Marian
Marian   
Added: 18 Mar 2018 09:23 GMT   
IP: 86.166.51.209
2:1:81906
Post by Marian: High Street Barnet

No, it?s not the parade of shops you mention, it?s Middle Row which was demolished in 1889 and was situated to the south of the parish church literally in the middle of the High Street!

Lynne Hqapgood
Lynne Hqapgood   
Added: 12 Feb 2018 11:05 GMT   
IP: 213.122.132.80
2:2:81906
Post by Lynne Hqapgood: Hutton Grove, N12

I have a question rather than a comment. When was 80 Hutton Grove built? My parents, Eddie and Margaret Hapgood, lived at 80 Hutton Grove from 1934 until sometime during the war,and I would love to know if they moved into a new-build house during the big suburban expansion in the 1930s. Does anyone out there know?! I visited very recently to see the road and the frontage of the house for the first time.

Scott Hatton
Scott Hatton   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 20:11 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:3:81906
Post by Scott Hatton: 12 Wansford Park, WD6

We moved to 12 Wansford Park during August 1960, moving out during 1967.

My parents had managed to wangle themselves into a house in London W10 which was due to be demolished by the local council. Thus the council moved them into a much better place (inside toilet!) opposite Tempsford Green in Borehamwood.

John Dye
John Dye   
Added: 1 Dec 2017 14:50 GMT   
IP: 86.131.134.236
2:4:81906
Post by John Dye: Cool Oak Lane, NW9

I lived at Queensbury Road, Kingsbury during World War II and used to play regularly along the edge of the Welsh Harp. About halfway along Cool Oak Lane on the south side was a pond we used to call Froggy Pond. It was the only place I ever saw a water scorpion, Nepa cinerea.
At the end of the war, all the street air raid shelters were knocked down and the rubble was piled up on the ground south of the Cool Oak Lane bridge, on the Hendon side. I remember that this heap of rubble became infested with rats and I used to watch them from the bridge. I was told that an old house on the south side of Cool Oak Lane (Woodfield House?) was once owned by the wife of Horatio Nelson. I think it later became the nurseries for plants grown for the Hendon parks.

John Morton
John Morton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 14:36 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:5:81906
Post by John Morton: Manor Way, WD6

I remember the following shops along Manor Way: Martins, Bishop’s, the Co Op and Dewhurst.

Ron
Ron   
Added: 24 Sep 2017 22:22 GMT   
IP: 92.6.6.10
2:6:81906
Post by Ron: Colindale

The leather business and ’Leatherville’ was set up by Arthur Garstin, not GARSTON.
:o)

Cassandra Green
Cassandra Green   
Added: 19 Sep 2017 21:39 GMT   
IP: 95.149.2.213
2:7:81906
Post by Cassandra Green: Rudall Crescent, NW3

I lived at 2 Rudall Crescent until myself and my family moved out in 1999. I once met a lady in a art fair up the road who was selling old photos of the area and was very knowledgeable about the area history, collecting photos over the years. She told me that before the current houses were built, there was a large manor house , enclosed by a large area of land. She told me there had been a fire there. Im trying to piece together the story and find out what was on the land before the crescent was built. This website is very interesting.

Martina
Martina   
Added: 13 Jul 2017 21:22 GMT   
IP: 146.198.174.6
2:8:81906
Post by Martina: Schweppes Factory

The site is now a car shop and Angels Fancy Dress shop and various bread factories are there.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 10 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:9:81906
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Gallants Farm survived until 1936.
Gallants Farm survived until 1936.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=42766

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 6 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:10:81906
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Lodge Lane has existed since the late eighteenth century.
Lodge Lane has existed since the late eighteenth century.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=22974

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 3 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
IP:
3:11:81906
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Central Square was the original centre of Hampstead Garden Suburb due to the further development of the Suburb in the 1920s and 1930s, it is now located towards the west.
Central Square was the original centre of Hampstead Garden Suburb due to the further development of the Suburb in the 1920s and 1930s, it is now located towards the west.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=14251

VIEW THE MILL HILL EAST AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE MILL HILL EAST AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE MILL HILL EAST AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE MILL HILL EAST AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE MILL HILL EAST AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Mill Hill East

Mill Hill East station is on the High Barnet branch of the Northern Line, and is the only station on a branch from Finchley Central.

Mill Hill East station was built by the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway (EH&LR) and was opened as Mill Hill on 22 August 1867 by the Great Northern Railway (GNR) (which had taken over the EH&LR) in rural Middlesex. The station was on a line from Finsbury Park to Edgware via Highgate.

The EH&LR was built as a double track formation, but only a single track was laid, with the intention of doubling the track when business developed. However, when the GNR opened a branch from Finchley Central to High Barnet in April 1872 traffic on that section was greater, and the second track was never laid from Finchley Central to Edgware. For most of its history the service between those two stations was operated as a shuttle.

The station opened as Mill Hill and was given its present name in 1928.

The area around Mill Hill East has still the air of a village about it. It is quiet and very green with plenty of parks and golf courses to hand.

Parts of the eastern side of Mill Hill have recently undergone redevelopment, with the old gas works replaced by a Waitrose supermarket and housing developments. The small local retail area at Mill Hill East is at “Kelly’s Corner” (officially Holders Hill Circus) east of the station. To the south of Mill Hill East are Copthall and Holders Hill.

The United Kingdom / Carl Zeiss / Bausch & Lomb Optical Works was established at Mill Hill East in 1912 and demolished in about 1990, to be replaced by a large building owned by the Jehovah Witnesses, to complement their nearby Watchtower House built on the site of the former Bittacy House.

Mill Hill East is the least used station on the Northern Line with only 10,000 passengers per week.
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