Hungerford Bridge

Bridge in/near River Thames, existing until now

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Bridge · River Thames · WC2N ·
November
18
2018

Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.

The original, Brunel-built Hungerford Bridge.
The first Hungerford Bridge, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was opened in 1845 as a suspension footbridge. It was named after neighbouring Hungerford Market. Hungerford Market in turn was named for Sir Edward Hungerford, an MP between 1659 and 1702.

In 1859, Brunel’s bridge was bought by the South Eastern Railway is they extended the South Eastern Railway into the newly opened Charing Cross station. The suspension bridge was replaced with a structure designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, comprising nine spans made of wrought iron lattice girders, which opened in 1864. Walkways were added on each side, with the upstream one later being removed when the railway was widened. The chains from the old bridge were reused in Brunel’s Clifton Suspension Bridge. The buttress on the South Bank still has the entrances and steps from the original steamer pier Brunel built.

In the mid-1990s a decision was made to replace the footbridge with new structures on either side of the existing railway bridge, and a competition was held in 1996 for a new design.

The concept design for the new footbridges was won by architects Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands. The two new four metre wide footbridges were completed in 2002. They were named the Golden Jubilee Bridges, in honour of the fiftieth anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession.

His real legacy, however, is probably in the fact that his Wikipedia entry is called "Edward Hungerford (spendthrift)".


Main source: Hungerford Bridge and Golden Jubilee Bridges - Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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The original, Brunel-built Hungerford Bridge.
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Christobel Warren-Jones
Christobel Warren-Jones   
Added: 26 Feb 2018 13:50 GMT   
IP: 143.159.49.39
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Post by Christobel Warren-Jones: Hurley Road, SE11

Hurley Road was off Kennington Lane, just west of Renfrew Raod, not where indicated on this map. My Dad was born at number 4 in 1912. It no longer exists but the name is remembered in Hurley House, Hurley Clinic and Hurley Pre-School

Pauline jones
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   
IP: 86.136.68.202
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Post by Pauline jones: Bessborough Place, SW1V

I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved L

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Johnshort
Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   
IP: 10.9.55.126
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Post by Johnshort: Hurley Road, SE11

There were stables in the road mid way also Danny reading had coal delivery lorry.n

peter hiller
peter hiller   
Added: 13 Sep 2017 11:07 GMT   
IP: 81.141.12.149
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Post by peter hiller: Sancroft Street, SE11

what is the history of tresco house 2 sancroft street ,it looks older than a 1990s site

Robert smitherman
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   
IP: 2.220.194.137
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Post by Robert smitherman: Saunders Street, SE11

I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 7 Dec 2019 16:27 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century.

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River Thames

London’s river


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