Albert Square, E20

Road in/near Walford, existing between 1985 and now

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Road · Walford · WD6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
October
24
2012
Queen Victoria public house, Albert Square
Credit: BBC

Albert Square is the fictional location of the BBC soap opera EastEnders.

It is ostensibly located in the equally fictional London borough of Walford in London.

Central to the Square is the garden - this is home to Arthur Fowler’s bench, which was placed there in memory of him.

One corner of the square is taken up by The Queen Victoria Public House. It is known to residents as the Queen Vic or simply ’The Vic’, and stands south of the square at number 45 Albert Square, where it joins with Bridge Street.

East of the pub is a building with 2 flats and west of these in the southwest corner leads off to a walkway through to Turpin Way, on which the Walford Community Centre and Playground are found.

To the west of the Queen Vic, across the junction with Bridge Street, is the Beale house, 45 Albert Square. Next to that is 43 Albert Square. In the southwest corner of the square is number 41. Between numbers 41 and 43 is Daisy Lane, a pathway connecting Albert Square to Victoria Square.

On the west edge of The Square there are two houses 18 and 20 Albert Square, which have been knocked through as a single property and then later separated again. It was previously Walford’s B&B, ’Kim’s Palace’. North of the old B&B is the rear of 55 Victoria Road. A row of five terraced houses line the north edge of Albert Square. The westernmost house is number 31. The property next door is split into two flats. Number 25 was the home of Dot Cotton.

The easternmost property in the terrace is number 23, which was destroyed in September 2014 by a fire. On the northeast edge of Albert Square is a car lot, south of which is another terrace of three elevated properties. The northernmost house is number 5. A road leaves to the north at the northeast edge of the square, passing by the car lot. The middle house is 3 Albert Square. Most southerly of this terrace is number 1, originally flats with the doctor’s surgery on the ground floor, which later becomes a single house.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



ADD A STORY TO ALBERT SQUARE
VIEW THE WALFORD AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WALFORD AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE WALFORD AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE WALFORD AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE WALFORD AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Walford

Walford is a fictional borough of east London in the BBC soap opera EastEnders.

The name Walford is both a street in Dalston where one of the series’ creators, Tony Holland, lived and a blend of Walthamstow, where Holland was born, and Stratford. The suffix ’ford’ is also found throughout East London, for example, South Woodford. Walford’s London postcode district is E20 (real East London postcode districts only went up to E18 until 2011, when E20 was introduced to serve the London 2012 Olympic Park).

Walford’s fictional tube station, Walford East, is located on the EastEnders tube map in the position normally occupied by the real Bromley-by-Bow tube station.



NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Albert Square, E20 ·
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Links

Londonist
All-encompassing website
British History Online
Digital library of key printed primary and secondary sources.
Time Out
Listings magazine

Maps


Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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