Scratchwood

Open space in/near Scratchwood, existing between 1923 and now

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Open space · Scratchwood · WD6 ·
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2018

Scratchwood is a 57-hectare, mainly wooded, country park in the London Borough of Barnet.


Scratchwood is a remnant of the once great Middlesex Forest, and has the largest area of ancient woodland which survives in Barnet. Parts of it may go back to the woods which grew up after the end of the last ice age, the Younger Dryas, 11,500 years ago.

The ancient woodland consists mainly of sessile oak and hornbeam, with some wild service trees, while secondary woodland areas are mainly birch, hawthorns and sycamore. In the view of the London Ecology Unit, "Scratchwood is the Borough’s best woodland in terms of floral diversity, especially of ancient woodland indicator species". The herb rich grassland and the pond have a number of rare plants. Breeding birds include nuthatch, lesser whitethroat and cuckoo.

The area of Scratchwood south of the entrance was once hay meadows, growing food for London’s vast horse population, but in 1866 Scratchwood and Moat Mount were part of a 400-hectare estate which was purchased by Edward William Cox, and Scratchwood was then used for sport and rearing game. The areas which are now nature reserves were purchased by Hendon Urban District Council in 1923.

The main entrance is by the car park, which is accessed from the northbound lane of Barnet Way, a dual carriageway which is part of the A1 road, near Stirling Corner. There is also access by a footpath from Barnet Lane in Elstree.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratchwood
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scratchwood


Scott Hatton
Scott Hatton   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 20:11 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:1:8983
Post by Scott Hatton: 12 Wansford Park, WD6

We moved to 12 Wansford Park during August 1960, moving out during 1967.

My parents had managed to wangle themselves into a house in London W10 which was due to be demolished by the local council. Thus the council moved them into a much better place (inside toilet!) opposite Tempsford Green in Borehamwood.

John Morton
John Morton   
Added: 17 Nov 2017 14:36 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:2:8983
Post by John Morton: Manor Way, WD6

I remember the following shops along Manor Way: Martins, Bishop’s, the Co Op and Dewhurst.

Scott Hatton
Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jun 2017 15:58 GMT   
IP: 217.63.200.50
2:3:8983
Post by Scott Hatton: Borehamwood

I was brought up in Borehamwood - first in Wansford Park and later in Theobald Street.

Irene Smith
Irene Smith   
Added: 30 Jun 2017 15:46 GMT   
IP: 217.63.200.50
2:4:8983
Post by Irene Smith: Keystone Passage, WD6

My mother worked at Keystones in the 1940 before she was married.

She later worked at home which a lot of people did. You would often see people walking around Boreham Wood with boxes filled with piecework for the factory.

VIEW THE SCRATCHWOOD AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE SCRATCHWOOD AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE SCRATCHWOOD AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE SCRATCHWOOD AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE SCRATCHWOOD AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Scratchwood

Scratchwood is an area on the edge of North London.

It was the former name of the London Gateway Services, named after woodland lying between the present M1 and A1.

One of the apocryphal stories of London is that the guns of HMS Belfast, moored next to City Hall, are trained on Stratchwood Services.
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Maps


Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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