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Website · Russell Square · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
MARCH
21
2019
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Russell Square, WC1B
Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields. Its name comes from the family name of the Dukes of Bedford.

The east side was the first to be built, between 1800 and 1817; the south side followed, then the gardens, and finally, the west and part of the north side were built.

Bolton House predated the development of the square; it was built in 1759 as Baltimore House and renamed after a later occupant, the Duke of Bolton and after the Square was developed, it became integrated into its numbering scheme

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, further houses were built on what had been the gardens to the north of Bolton House; these were nos 68–70 Russell Square

It was a prestige development of big houses in a very large square - larger than any residential square previously built in London.

»more


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

 

Featured articles

MARCH
20
2019

 

Russell Square, WC1B
Russell Square was laid out from 1800 by James Burton following the demolition of Bedford House, which originally stood on the site surrounded by gardens and fields. Its name comes from the family name of the Dukes of Bedford.

The east side was the first to be built, between 1800 and 1817; the south side followed, then the gardens, and finally, the west and part of the north side were built.

Bolton House predated the development of the square; it was built in 1759 as Baltimore House and renamed after a later occupant, the Duke of Bolton and after the Square was developed, it became integrated into its numbering scheme

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, further houses were built on what had been the gardens to the north of Bolton House; these were nos 68–70 Russell Square

It was a prestige development of big houses in a very large square - larger than any residential square previously built in London.
»read full article


MARCH
19
2019

 

Camden Square, NW1
Camden Square is a long green space running north east to south west parallel to Camden Road. This area was laid out over fields in the 1840s but was only finally completed around 1880.

It had been determined that Camden Square should be a higher class development. The earlier portions of Camden Town were already deteriorating socially. Hence there was a generous provision of green space and to deal with spiritual matters, St Paul’s Church, a neo-gothic structure, was consecrated in 1849. A contemporary lithograph by C.J. Greenwood shows the church with cattle in the foreground, and a view stretching along the emerging Cantelowes Road towards St Paul’s Cathedral. Large houses were concentrated around Camden Square with more modest buildings leading from the Square, loosely following the example of Covent Garden.

Upmarket ambitions faltered as high density housing was placed to the north east, as Camden Terrace, North Villas and South Villas.

Then, the Midland Railway arrived in 1864. Cut-and-cover construction bisected Camde...
»more


MARCH
18
2019

 

St Georges Row, SW1V
St Georges Row was built as Monster Row circa 1785, and renamed in 1833. The ground between Victoria Station and the river occupies the site of the old manor of Neyte, which belonged to the Abbey of Westminster until confiscated by Henry VIII in 1536. It was a favourite residence of the Abbots, and here also lived John of Gaunt, and here John, son of Richard, Duke of York, was born in 1448. In 1592 the manor became a farm and passed with the Ebury Estate into the possession of the Grosvenor family.

The manor-house stood on the later St George’s Row, and in Pepys’ time was a popular pleasure-garden. Between the Willow Walk (Warwick Street) and the river were the Neat House Gardens, which supplied a large part of London with vegetables. The name lingered until the present century among the houses on the river-bank, and is still commemorated by Neat House Buildings in Ranelagh Road. The whole area was low-lying and swampy, and the neighbourhood of Eccleston Square was occupied by a vast osier bed.

In 1827, Cubitt raised the ...
»more


MARCH
17
2019

 

Bayswater Road, W2
Bayswater Road is the main road running along the northern edge of Hyde Park. Like Oxford Street to the east, Bayswater Road follows the course of the old Roman road linking London with Silchester.

The eastern end of Bayswater Road starts at the Marble Arch junction, and in the west continues into Notting Hill Gate. It is mostly within the City of Westminster but a small portion of the road’s western end lies in Kensington and Chelsea.

By 1828, the main road (then known as Uxbridge Road) facing Kensington Gardens, had been built up between St Petersburg Place and Porchester Terrace. Along the west side of Black Lion Lane there were houses as far as the corner of Moscow Road and more spacious villas, at first called Westbourne Terrace, farther north almost reaching Pickering Place at the southern end of Westbourne Green. The east side of Black Lion Lane was still open, apart from a few large houses at the Uxbridge Road end, and villas lined Porchester Terrace only as far as the corner of Craven Hill, which itself had cottages only...
»more


MARCH
14
2019

 

Ainger Road, NW3
Ainger Road lies along the boundary of St John’s Hampstead, a parish which saw rapid development in the nineteenth century. The name commemorates Thomas Ainger, vicar of St John’s from 1841 until his death in 1863, who provided clinics, schools and churches to go with the new houses in the area.

George Pownall was the builder/developer responsible for developing the street. In 1868 Pownall proposed to build several new roads. After building in Albert Park and Oppidans Road, Ainger Road was built in 1869. By 1879, Pownall had built 38 houses, three stables and a workshop.
»read full article


MARCH
11
2019

 

Hatton Garden, EC1N
Hatton Garden is a street and area noted as London’s jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade. The name ’Hatton Garden’ is derived from the garden of Ely Place, the London residence of the Bishop of Ely, which was given to Sir Christopher Hatton by Elizabeth I in 1581, during a vacancy of the see.

The area surrounding Hatton Garden has been the centre of London’s jewellery trade since medieval times. The old City of London had streets, or quarters, dedicated to types of business, and the area around Hatton Garden became a centre for jewellers and jewellery. Nearly 300 businesses in Hatton Garden are in the jewellery industry and over 55 shops represent the largest cluster of jewellery retailers in the UK. The largest of these companies is De Beers, the international family of companies that dominate the international diamond trade. De Beers has its headquarters in a complex of offices and warehouses just behind the main Hatton Garden shopping street. The area also plays host to a large number of media, publishing and creative businesses, including Blinkbox ...
»more


MARCH
10
2019

 

Lower Marsh Market
Lower Marsh Market is in the Waterloo area of London. Lower Marsh Market and a variety of vintage shops, pubs, bookshops, art galleries, independent coffee spaces and a variety of restaurants featuring food from many ethnic origins.

In 2015, the market was reported as having 77 stalls.

»read full article


MARCH
5
2019

 

Ethelburga Street, SW11
Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking. Ethelburga was the sister of Earconwald, Bishop of London. Earconwold founded a double monastery at Barking for his sister, and a monastery at Chertsey for himself. Barking appears to have already been established by the time of the plague in 664 AD.

Ethelburga had been at some time based in a manor which was sited in what became Battersea Park near to Albert Bridge Road.

Before Battersea Bridge was built around 1771, the area contained scattered houses, lanes and tracks. Once lane which then stretched right across the modern Battersea Park was Marsh Lane. The section across the park disappeared but the remainder of Marsh Lane was made into Ethelburga Street in 1871. At the time, the street stretched from Battersea Bridge Road to Albert Bridge Road.

A house called Park House (now demolished) was built in 1873 at the (north) corner of Ethelburga Street and Battersea Bridge Road for Benjamin Cooke, a builder who built a lot of Battersea.
»more


MARCH
4
2019

 

Talbot Yard, SE1
Talbot Yard used to host one of the most famous inns in English literature. The Tabard was immortalised by Chaucer when he selected it as the starting place of the pilgrims in his celebrated Pilgrims Progress. He sets the scene at the Inn on the night before the pilgrimage:

‘Byfel that in that sesoun on a day,
In Southwark at the Tabard as I lay
Ready to wenden on my pilgrimage
To Canterbury, with ful devout courage,
At night was come into that hostelrie,
Wel nyne and twenty in a compainye.’
The Tabard as it stood in 1875 was not the inn that Chaucer knew of 1388; the original was destroyed by fire in 1628.

The inn first appeared on the scene in 1304 when the Abbot and Convent of Hythe became the owner of two houses purchased from William Latergareshall. On the site of these houses the Abbot built a dwelling house and a hostelry and erected the sign of the Tabard, a sleeveless leather coat. It was probably the first of the High Street inns and the forerunner of a multiplicity of inns,...
»more


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