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FEBRUARY
27
2015

 

Frognal, NW3
A road called Frognal runs from Church Row in Hampstead downhill to Finchley Road and follows the course of a stream which goes on to form the River Westbourne. In 1878, Frognal was described as a beautiful suburban village, full of gentlemen's seats. In 1903 it still had an air of affluence but was overlooked by 'many windowed, scarlet-faced mansions' and had lost its 'aimless paths and trees'. Building had covered most of the frontage to the road, old as well as new, and was encroaching on the large private gardens.

Frognal has a diverse architecture, with many architecturally notable buildings. The central area, lacking large council estates, has undergone less change than some other parts of Hampstead. University College School, an independent day school founded in 1830, relocated to Frognal (the road) in 1907. Frognall Grove, Grade II listed, (1871–72) was large house inherited by the architect George Edmund Street, who made additions to it. It was later subdivided into four semi-detached houses.
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FEBRUARY
25
2015

 

Sandwell House
Sandwell House was owned by three generations of the Wachter family. In 1655 William Hitchcock, merchant tailor, built a 'mansion house' to the south of what was later known as Sandwell.

Sandwell was held by three generations of Wachters, London merchants, possibly Jews, from c. 1649 to 1686.

By 1762, a Mr Armine Snoxell owned the house and stabling.

As West Hampstead developed at the turn of the 20th century, the house was demolished and Sandwell Mansions constructed on the site.
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FEBRUARY
24
2015

 

Hillfield
By 1644 Hillfield was already mentioned in parish records. Richard Gibbs, a goldsmith, acquired Hillfield on the east side of West End (or Kilburn) Lane, north of Jacksfield, together with two houses in 1644.

One may have been the decayed brick house purchased from Gibbs before 1663 by the father of Matthew Blueh, a Chancery clerk.

The Hillfield estate was held by another Londoner in 1685 and the house was 'new fronted and much beautified and another house built' after 1703 by Henry Binfield.

Both houses, with their coach houses, were owned by Mary Binfield in 1762. One was West End Hall and the other possibly Treherne House.
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FEBRUARY
23
2015

 

Gas Light and Coke Company
The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century. In 1845 the Western Gas Company had opened a gasworks on land, previously the property of Sir George Talbot, with frontages to both the canal and the railway.

Taken over by the Gas Light and Coke Company (also known as the Westminster Gas Light and Coke Company) was a company that made and supplied coal gas and coke. It is identified as the original company from which British Gas plc is descended.
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FEBRUARY
22
2015

 

Exmoor Street (1950)
Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street. A bomb had demolished many of the houses of St Charles Square, in the right foreground. The western end of Rackham Street can be seen behind on the right. The gasometer which dominated the area, survived the war, finally demolished in the 1980s.

With all the bomb damage meaning unhabitable housing, the streets are largely empty of people.
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FEBRUARY
20
2015

 

Hudson's the chemist (1906)
Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate. The Queens Park Estate was built from 1874 by the Artisans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company. It stretches from Kilburn Lane down to the Harrow Road. The architecture of the estate of some 2000 small houses is distinctively Gothic-revival, with polychrome brickwork, pinnacles and turrets along the bigger roads.

It retains First Avenue, Second Avenue etc up to Sixth Avenue, and originally had streets A-P. The street names have been made into full words, (Alperton Street, Barfett Street, Caird Street, Droop Street, Embrook Street, Farrant Street, Galton Street, Huxley Street, Ilbert Street, Kilravock Street, Lothrop Street, Marne Street, Nutbourne Street, Oliphant Street, Peach Street).

It was on this estate that the first QPR footballers had their homes.

This photograph dates from 1906.
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FEBRUARY
19
2015

 

West End Hall
West End Hall (once called New West End Hall) was one of the mansions of West End (West Hampstead). Several houses in West End were mentioned in the early 17th century and by the mid century London merchants were building larger ones.

West End Hall was owned 1796-1807 by the family of the Hon. Richard Walpole, M.P., in 1807 by Lord Walpole, and 1815-89 by John Miles and his wife.

West End Hall was a square red-brick house, built probably at the end of the 17th century and was described by contempories as "of respectable antiquity and standing back behind a rather dilapidated wooden palisade but a row of magnificent elms lines the street before". In the grounds, a fair was held annually on July 26 and two following days.

Publisher John Miles married Ann Chater in 1810; and the couple moved to West End House three years later. They became benefactors of West End. Eustace Hamilton Miles, their grandson, was born there in 1868.

Eustace went to Kings College Cambridge in 1887, and he began a distinguished career in racquets (an ...
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FEBRUARY
18
2015

 

Westminster Cathedral Choir School
Westminster Cathedral Choir School is a boarding and day preparatory school for boys in Victoria. All choristers at the cathedral board at the school. The school has direct passageways to the Cathedral on Victoria Street and is therefore considered a part of it.

It is one of two Roman Catholic cathedral schools in the United Kingdom, the other being St John’s in Cardiff, Wales.

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FEBRUARY
18
2015

 

Hackney College
The Village Itinerancy Society, a Congregationalist college, was transformed into Hackney Theological Seminary. This was renamed as Hackney College in 1871 and later relocated from its origins in Hackney to a new building in Hampstead.

New College, another institution, and Hackney College became constituents of the University of London's Faculty of Theology when the faculty was created in 1900. They were united by Act of Parliament in 1924 as Hackney and New College, which was renamed New College, London in 1936.

New buildings were erected behind the Hackney College premises at Hampstead, and were opened in 1938.

When, in 1972, most English Congregational churches joined the newly formed United Reformed Church (URC), and only a small number remained independent, the New College's work was reorganised. In 1976, its library was donated to Dr Williams's Library. Since 1981, the work of the college has been continued by the New College London Foundation, which trains ministers for the URC and Congregational churches.

After closure in 1977 ...
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FEBRUARY
17
2015

 

Thavie’s Inn
Thavie’s Inn was a former Inn of Chancery, associated with Lincoln’s Inn, established at Holborn, near the site of the present side street and office block still known as Thavies Inn Buildings. Thavie’s Inn is one of the earliest Inns of Chancery on record, both by date of establishment and dissolution. It remains a well-known City of London landmark, where Lloyd’s Bank is situated, on the opposite side of Holborn Circus from Ely Place.

Lincoln’s Inn sold Thavie’s Inn for redevelopment in 1785, the proceeds being used to erect ’Stone Buildings’

Read the Thavie’s Inn entry on the Wikipedia...
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FEBRUARY
17
2015

 

Woodbine Cottage
Woodbine Cottage was situated at the south-eastern corner of the Flitcroft estate. It was probably built in the 1860s and was home to the Eley family and later of the society beauty, Mrs Laura Thistlethwayte. In 1895 Lyncroft Gardens was constructed through the site of the cottage and its grounds.
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FEBRUARY
14
2015

 

St Martins Mission
Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street. It was built by Mr Allen, a local builder. It was the Mission Church of Saint Michael and All Angels, Ladbroke Grove.

After 1916 it become a parish stretching from Ladbroke Grove to St Quintin's Park.

The area was bombed during the Second World War, and the whole of Rackham Street disappeared in the early 1950s.

A theory discussed about the photo is that it may show the last days of Rackham Street as people were packing to move out.
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FEBRUARY
12
2015

 

Potter's Iron Foundry
In the nineteenth century, many West Hampstead people had jobs in Potter’s Iron Foundry. The iron and brass foundry of Thomas Potter & Sons was established c. 1860 by Thomas Potter of Poplar House, a West End resident by 1854.

Twelve cottages called Potter's Buildings (later West Cottages) were under construction by George Potter immediately north of the foundry in 1864, apparently because local hostility made it impossible for his workmen to find other accommodation. There was also hostility to plans for making gas to light the workshops, with the result that a half-built gasometer could be used only as a water tank.

Among the foundry's products were metalwork for the outer screen walls of G. E. Street's Law Courts (built 1874-82) and for Welbeck Abbey (Notts.), besides church fittings. A younger Thomas Potter, who lived at the Elms in the 1880s, built on sites north of Poplar House and around Sumatra Road. The foundry had closed by 1894 and was replaced by the flats called Welbeck Mansions.
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FEBRUARY
10
2015

 

West End Park
West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'. In 1851 West End was a hamlet mainly of agricultural labourers, gardeners, craftsmen, and tradespeople for daily needs, with an innkeeper and two beershop keepers and a schoolmistress; the few gentry included Rear-Admiral Sir George Sartorius (1790-1885) of West End House, a retired ironfounder, a surgeon, some civil servants, and a clergyman.

South of the village, the fifteen years from 1879 witnessed great developments after the opening of the third and final railway through the area, the Metropolitan & St. John's Wood, with a station in West End Lane (West Hampstead). Stations on the other two lines opened in 1880 and 1888.

The first to exploit the railway was Donald Nicoll MP, owner of a gentlemen's outfitter's in Regent Street, who leased Oaklands Hall between 1861 to 1872.

He owned portions of the Little Estate to the north and west, together forming a 23 acre estate which he called West End Park.

Nicoll was a directo...
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FEBRUARY
8
2015

 

Portobello Farm
Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal. In 1740, Portobello Farm was built in the area near what is now Golborne Road. The farm got its name from a popular victory during the War of Jenkins’ Ear, when Admiral Edward Vernon captured the Spanish-ruled town of Puerto Bello (now known as Portobelo in modern-day Panama).

Green’s Lane became known as Porto Bello Lane; the title which it held by 1841.

The farmstead extended westward beyond what is now Ladbroke Grove covering land afterward occupied by St. Charles Hospital.

The Portobello farming area covered the land which is now St. Charles Hospital. The farm itself was sold to an order of nuns after the railways came in 1864. They built St Joseph’s Convent for the Dominican Order or the Black Friars as they were known in England.
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FEBRUARY
5
2015

 

Beckford's Estate
Beckfords, belonging to the family of the same name, consisted of 15 acres north of Mill Lane and west of Fortune Green Lane. It was sold in 1865 to the Real Property Company and in 1868 to the Land Company of London, which laid out Hillfield Road and Aldred Street in building plots.

Development was slow. Two houses and a temporary church were built in Mill Lane, east of the junction with Aldred Road, in 1874 and one plot fronting Mill Lane, sold in 1875, was built on by 1878. Premises for Field Lane boys' industrial school were built on the north side of Hillfield Road in 1877. Sustained building began in 1878 and by 1890 some 88 houses, by various builders, had been erected in Hillfield Road; 16 were built in 1888 in Aldred Road by Cossens, who lived there, and the Pavement, nos. 41-83 (odd), was built in Mill Lane. In 1908 Berridge House opened next to the industrial school, at the junction of Hillfield Road and Fortune Green Lane, as the National Society's training college for teachers of domestic subjects.
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FEBRUARY
4
2015

 

National School
A National School was established in West End during 1844. National schools were founded in 19th century England and Wales by the National Society for Promoting Religious Education. These schools provided elementary education, in accordance with the teaching of the Church of England, to the children of the poor.

They provided the first near-universal system of elementary education in England and Wales. The schools were eventually absorbed into the state system, either as fully state-run schools or as faith schools funded by the state.

The West End National school, together with a cottage for the schoolmistress was built in the grounds of Cholmley Lodge in 1844.

The Emmanuel Church of England Primary School is now on the site.
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FEBRUARY
3
2015

 

Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950)
The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them. On the left (south) side of the street, a local tradesmen's trolley can be seen - possibly a knife sharpener.

However, a clue to the empty streets can perhaps be seen further down the street. A huge gap in the houses shows the bomb damage from 1940, some ten years before.

The photographer of these shots toured streets, perhaps knowing the fate of the area. The view would be utterly transformed by subsequent redevelopment in the early 1950s.
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FEBRUARY
2
2015

 

Red Lion
The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road. Rebuilt in the late 19th century, this pub had occupied this site since 1444.

This pub was known as The Westbury at time of closure in 2012.
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FEBRUARY
1
2015

 

Fairyland
During the period leading up to and during the First World War, 92 Tottenham Court Road was the location of a shooting range called Fairyland. In 1909, it was reported in a police investigation that the range was being used by two Suffragettes in a possible conspiracy to assassinate Prime Minister Herbert Asquith.

It was the place where, in 1909, Madan Lal Dhingra practised shooting prior to his assassination of Sir William Hutt Curzon Wyllie.

Other residents of India House and members of Abhinav Bharat practised shooting at the range and rehearsed assassinations they planned to carry out.

It was also the place where, with regard to in R v Lesbini (1914), Donald Lesbini shot Alice Eliza Storey. R v Lesbini was a case that established in British, Canadian and Australian law that, with regard to voluntary manslaughter, a reasonable man always has reasonable powers of self-control and is never intoxicated

The shooting range was owned and run by Henry Stanton Morley (1875-1916).
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