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JANUARY
30
2016

 

Holly Walk, NW3
Holly Walk connects Holly Hill with Church Row. In 1811, Hampstead vestry bought a 2½ acre field on the east side of Holly Walk for a churchyard, which it made from only the southern portion.

Most of the cottages which line Holly Walk date from 1813.

St Mary’s Catholic Church was built in 1796 by and for refugees who fled their homeland during the French Revolution.

Beyond the church a plaque on the wall of number 9 Holly Place, named The Watch House, advises that "in the 1830s the newly formed Hampstead Police Force set out on its patrol and nightly watch from this house."
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JANUARY
29
2016

 

St John’s Hill
St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area. St John’s Hill is the summit of the high ground of Notting Hill.

When the Kensington Hippodrome was in operation before 1841, the grassy mound here formed "a sort of natural grand-stand," railed in as a hill for pedestrians.

The summit of the hill is described by Florence Gladstone as being a point along "Upper Lansdown Terrace" rather than the church.
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JANUARY
28
2016

 

St John’s, Notting Hill
St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill. St John’s was designed by the architects John Hargrave Stevens (1805/6–1857) and George Alexander (1810–1885), and built in the Victorian Gothic style. Dedicated to St John the Evangelist, the church was originally built as the centrepiece of the Ladbroke Estate, a mid nineteenth century housing development designed to attract upper and upper middle class residents to what was then a largely rural neighbourhood in the western suburbs of London.

In 1821 James Weller Ladbroke (died 1847) and his architect Thomas Allason (1790–1852) began to plan an estate on land which now spans the southern end of Ladbroke Grove. From 1837 to 1841 a significant part of this land was used as the Hippodrome race-course. The hill that is now surmounted by St John’s was used by spectators as a natural grandstand to view the races. The Hippodrome was not however a financial success, and by 1843 it had closed, the circular racecourse soon to be replaced by crescents of stuccoed houses.
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JANUARY
26
2016

 

Kingdon Road, NW6
Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road. Kingdon Road was possibly named after a speculator Emmeline Kingdon, and houses there date between 1883 and 1888.

Three blocks of flats, named Dene Mansions after Little Dene, home of the Ripley family, replaced Lauriston Lodge in 1904 which had been situated on what became the corner of Kingdon Road and Dennington Park Road.
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JANUARY
23
2016

 

Bangor Street, W11
Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court. Originally called George Street, it was the most notorious road of the Notting Dale ‘Special Area’ slum.

It was more colloquially known as ‘Do as you like Street’, a place where ‘no one left their door closed’, and the venue of the Rag Fair. At the turn of the 20th century, the local district nurses were reported "valiantly holding their own in spite of the disturbance caused by nightly brawls and the noisy and unsavoury Sunday markets."

Valerie Wilson recalled in an interview by the Notting Dale Urban Studies group: “They used to threaten us – don’t go up rag fair and the first thing we did when we got outside, we forgot all about it and went straight through rag fair… that was really like a film show, they used to hang old bits of clothing on the railings… the street would throng with people… there was a group of men who came out the war and they were all ex-servicemen, big tall strong men, and they couldn’t get work, so they formed this group and they ...
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JANUARY
22
2016

 

College Cresent, NW3
College Crescent lies on the boundary between Swiss Cottage and Belsize Park. The Eyre family, local landowners, was always anxious to promote building and in 1794 a plan was drawn up on the model of Bath, with a crescent, circus, and square. The plan was never executed but from 1802 development on the Eyre estate was directed by John Shaw, a young architect inspired by the town-planning ideals of the late 18th century. In 1803-4 he exhibited views of a projected circus and in 1807 building began on the Marylebone portion.

In 1819 Col. Eyre began the first of several attempts to promote the construction of a public road through his estate, ultimately successful in the Finchley Road Act of 1826. Finchley New Road and Avenue Road, the southern part of which existed by 1824, thrust northward into the Hampstead portion of Eyre’s land and were built by 1829. The Swiss Cottage tavern was built at the apex of the two roads by 1841.

Building spread northward in the salient formed by the Finchley and Avenue roads. A building agreement was ...
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JANUARY
21
2016

 

The Eagle
The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road. This pub sits on the corner of Telford Road and the top end of Ladbroke Grove in west London. The most remarkable feature being the sinister and brooding Eagle sat on the top of the corner-splay. There are also a couple of Truman’s Beers lanterns still present and an iron Truman’s sign-holder jutting out from the wall.

There are a number of quirky touches, such as the stately oil paintings denoting the ladies and gents toilets, the elegant black railings that prop up the heavy-set wooden bar, and perhaps most notably, an Olympic-sized canoe suspended from the ceiling.
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JANUARY
20
2016

 

Weston’s Cider House
In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road. It was closed in 1970 and demolished as part of a road improvement scheme.
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JANUARY
19
2016

 

The Mitre
The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road. The pub closed c.1972 after it burnt down.

After The Mitre was demolished, it eventually became home to Cafe O’Porto, one of Golborne’s favourite coffee shops.
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JANUARY
18
2016

 

Woodfield Crescent, W9
Woodfield Crescent was a former street in London W9. Most likely built in the 1880s, the road ceased to exist in the 1960s once the area was redeveloped.
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JANUARY
17
2016

 

North Kensington Library
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries. It was built as part of the free library movement.
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JANUARY
16
2016

 

Tavistock Mews, W11
Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road. Tavistock Mews is a short mews off Hayden’s Place, running behind Nos. 237-247 (odds) Portobello Road. Originally, the entrance to it was through an archway between Nos. 239 and 241 Portobello Road and there was no way through from Hayden’s Place. No trace of that entrance remains and Tavistock Mews is now effectively a branch of Hayden’s Place. The eastern side is lined with storage units and the other side gives access to the rears of the Portobello houses.

The mews was built in the 1860s and there is a full set of early deeds for the original Nos. 1-3 Tavistock Mews in the Local Studies section of Kensington Central Library. The buildings are described in the deeds as “coach-houses and tenements” – i.e. the coach-house would have been on the ground floor with accommodation above. In the 1920s, it was the Home of the Tavistock Mews Lads’ Club and Institute.

In 1933 the Mews was clearly in a very dilapidated state and it was declared a clearance area. ...
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JANUARY
15
2016

 

Stanley Gardens Mews, W11
Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s. Almost all that remains of the old Stanley Gardens Mews is the entrance through an arch on the left side of St Peter’s church in Kensington Park Road, together with a stretch of the old cobbles under the arch. There is also some attractive ironwork decoration under the arch.

It was a standard mews, both sides lined with small units, stables with accommodation above, running behind the Victorian terrace at Nos. 92-110 Kensington Park Road. There were 15 units in all. They were probably built in 1861 at the same time as the houses in this bit of Kensington Park Road, as the mews appears on the 1863 Ordnance Survey map.

By the end of the Second World War, the Mews was in a pretty dilapidated state. Nos. 11 and 12, the two houses immediately behind the 20th Century Theatre (formerly the Victoria Hall) belonged to the theatre and had been used as dressing rooms and to store stage scenery. But according to planning documents, by 1954 they were dilapidated and ...
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JANUARY
13
2016

 

Lansdowne Cresent, W11
Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles. When James Weller Ladbroke decided in the early 1820s to develop for housing the 170-acres of mostly farmland that he had developed from his uncle, he commissioned the architect/surveyor Thomas Allason (1790-1852) to draw up a plan in which a circular road, more than 500 metres in diameter, was intersected by an axial road on the alignment of the future Ladbroke Grove. In 1825 a short-lived building boom began along Holland Park Avenue. But this quickly collapsed, and the area of the circular road was from 1837 to 1841 occupied by the Hippodrome race- and steeplechase course. That also lost money, and after it closed there began a series of longer-lived building developments, a key part of which was an evolving layout of terraces, crescents and the large Ladbroke Square, each built with a paddock or communal garden. The new layout departed considerably from Allason’s original layout, but it did retain at least some of the crescent forms (including Lansdowne Crescent) near to St John’s...
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JANUARY
11
2016

 

Ladbroke Terrace, W11
Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate. Building started in the 1820s at the Holland Park Avenue end, on the eastern side with four villas between the Avenue and what was to become Ladbroke Road. Others followed within ten years.

The normal development pattern seems to have been followed with James Weller Ladbroke first giving building leases, and then once the houses were constructed giving 99-year leases of the buildings at a relatively low ground rent to the developer, who could then sell the leaseholds or sublet the houses to recoup his outlay.
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JANUARY
10
2016

 

Winchester Hotel
Winchester Hotel was situated at 21a Winchester Road, NW3 It closed about 1970 to become home to the Winchester Project, a local youth centre.
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JANUARY
7
2016

 

Welbeck Mansions, NW6
Welbeck Mansions, flats notable for their ironwork balconies, were built north of Inglewood Road in 1897. They were built on the site of Potter’s foundry.
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JANUARY
6
2016

 

West Cottages, NW6
Cottages in London NW6. Industry came to West Hampstead, in the form of Thomas Potter’s foundry on the south-west side of West End Green, arrived in the 1860s, followed by Potter’s Buildings or West Cottages for its workers.
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JANUARY
5
2016

 

Inglewood Road, NW6
Inglewood Road, NW6 was one of the last roads to be built in West End, West Hampstead. On the west side of West End Lane, the land between the three railway lines was still largely untouched but beyond them building spread during the 1880s.

Thomas Potter, owner of Thorplands, 13 acres south of Mill Lane, stretching westward from the junction with West End Lane, where he lived in Poplar House, built about 15 houses fronting Mill Lane between 1873 and 1877 and the Elms and the Cedars next to the green by 1878.

New roads were constructed in the late 1870s and 346 houses were built between 1882 and 1894 in Sumatra, Solent, Holmdale, Glenbrook, Pandora, and Narcissus roads, mostly by J. I. Chapman of Solent Road, G. W. Cossens of Mill Lane, Jabez Reynolds of Holmdale Road, and James Gibb of Dennington Park Road.

Another 28 houses and a Methodist church were built on the estate fronting Mill Lane in 1886-7 and seven blocks of flats in West End Lane on what was called the Cedars estate in 1894.

Some 49 houses were ...
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JANUARY
4
2016

 

Inglewood House, NW6
Inglewood House is on the corner of West End Lane and Inglewood Road. Inglewood Road was built on the site of Poplar House in 1893.
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JANUARY
3
2016

 

Marlborough Mansions, NW6
Marlborough Mansions is a residential block in Fortune Green, NW6 E. J. Cave, one of the district’s most prominent Victorian builders, built the Cannon Hill estate where Marlborough, Buckingham and Avenue Mansions were built in the triangle formed by Cannon Hill, Finchley Road, and West End Lane in 1896-1900.

Conductor Sir Adrian Boult lived at at 78 Marlborough Mansions on Cannon Hill and has a blue plaque to his memory there. Nigel Balchin, the novelist, died in 1970 also in Marlborough Mansions.
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