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FEBRUARY
29
2016

 

Sellon's Farm
To the east of Harlesden, there were still several farms, Elmwood, Haycroft, Upper Roundwood, and Sellon’s until the late 1890s. Sellon’s Farm stood at the current location of the point where Springwell Avenue meets Park Parade.
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FEBRUARY
28
2016

 

Tottenham Court Road, W1T
Tottenham Court Road is a major road running from the junction of Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road, north to Euston Road - a distance of about three-quarters of a mile. In the time of Henry III (1216–1272), a manor house slightly north-west of what is now the corner of Tottenham Court Road and Euston Road belonged to one William de Tottenhall. In about the 15th century, the area was known variously as Totten, Totham, or Totting Hall. After changing hands several times, the manor was leased for 99 years to Queen Elizabeth, and it came to be popularly called Tottenham Court.

Tottenham Court Road nowadays is a significant shopping street, best known for its high concentration of consumer electronics shops. Further north there are several furniture shops, including Habitat and Heals.

In the 1950s and 1960s, Tottenham Court Road and a few of the adjoining streets became well known for stores selling World War II surplus radio and electronics equipment and all kinds of electro-mechanical and radio parts. Shops such as Proops Brothers and Z & I Aero Services lined both sides of the road at that time. By the 1960s they were als...
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FEBRUARY
25
2016

 

Frognal, NW3
Frognal, a locality in Hampstead, is also the name of the road linking Finchley Road with Hampstead Village. The first reference to Frognal is as a customary tenement in the 15th century, probably on the site of the later Frognal House (now 99 Frognal). A ’customary tenement’ was an estate held on condition that the customs of the manor (of Hampstead) were adhered to, which involved performing certain tasks and making various payments.

By the mid-eighteenth century it was a significant settlement, sought after by eminent lawyers, and infill development continued through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Only in the 1870s did the road - at first called Frognal Lane - extend southwards to reach Finchley Road.

Frognal has a diverse architecture, with many architecturally notable buildings. The central area, lacking large council estates, has undergone less change than some other parts of Hampstead.

University College School, an independent day school founded in 1830, relocated to Frognal in 1907. Frognall Grove, Grade II listed,...
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FEBRUARY
22
2016

 

Wilsham Street, W11
Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road. Charles Booth’s poverty map placed the Kensington Potteries among the "criminal and irreclaimable areas", largely on account of the overcrowded condition of its unsuitable and derelict houses.

Five short streets in the district became known as the "Special Area.": Bangor Street, Crescent Street and three roads that have been renamed. St. Clement’s, now called Sirdar Road, St. Katherine’s Road, now Wilsham Street, and William, now Kenley Street.

In 1899 an enquiry was undertaken at the instance of the London County Council, and it was found that nearly half the babies born in this area died before they were a year old.

In 1904 there was a public-house to every twenty-five dwellings in these streets, and about twenty-three common lodging-houses provided accommodation for over seven hundred persons, at a nightly charge of fourpence or sixpence.

Greater however than the evil of these licensed lodging-houses, was that of the fur...
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FEBRUARY
20
2016

 

Alma Place, NW10
Alma Place is a small side street off of the Harrow Road, NW10. Alma Road, a small cul-de-sac lies directly north of the cemeteries of Kensal Green and also directly over the western end of the tunnel which carries the railway between Willesden Junction and Kensal Green.

It first appears on the maps of the 1880s.
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FEBRUARY
19
2016

 

An introduction to Hampstead by G.E. Mitton (1902)
This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902) The name of this borough is clearly derived from "ham," or "hame," a home; and "steede," a place, and has consequently the same meaning as homestead. Park, in a note in his book on Hampstead, says that the "p" is a modern interpolation, scarcely found before the seventeenth century, and not in general use until the eighteenth.

Lysons says that the Manor of Hampstead was given in 986 a.d. by King Ethelred to the church at Westminster, and that this gift was confirmed by Edward the Confessor; but there is an earlier charter of King Edgar of uncertain date, probably between 963 and 978. It granted the land at Hamstede to one Mangoda, and the limits of the grant are thus stated: "From Sandgate along the road to Foxhanger; from the Hanger west to Watling Street north along the street to the Cucking Pool; from the Cucking Pool east to Sandgate."

Professor Hales, who thinks, whether genuine or not, this charter is certainly of value, interprets Sandgate as North...
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FEBRUARY
17
2016

 

Kilravock Street, W10
Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10 The Queens Park Estate is a composition of buildings, streets, trees and open spaces which as a group is an asset to the community. The Estate has a special character which distinguishes it from its
surroundings. It displays the historical associations with the Artizans, Labourers and General Dwellings Company and with the Garden City Movement. The composition of the terraces, the architectural design, construction, detailing of the buildings and layout of the streets, define collectively the Estate’s cohesive townscape.

Much of the Estate’s charm and interesting character derives from the architects’ use of gothic ornamental detail, multi-coloured brickwork, decorative stonework and double hung sash windows. Within the Estate, each property is an integral part of the design. Apart from some exceptions such as the turreted houses, there is little variety between individual houses in the street or between the streets themselves and so each property makes is own co...
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FEBRUARY
15
2016

 

Huxley Street, W10
Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate. Before construction started in 1874, the Queen’s Park Estate was proving very popular - 1500 applications from prospective tenants had been received.

By 1881 there were five classes of property, the rents varying according to the size and number of rooms. Queen’s Park was a success The Queen’s Park Estate was sold to Paddington Council in 1964 and it is the only Estate of its type within Westminster.
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FEBRUARY
14
2016

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10. Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had
already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to
owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts
of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
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FEBRUARY
13
2016

 

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family. When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ‘I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ‘luxury’.

‘When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up...
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FEBRUARY
12
2016

 

29 Rackham Street, W10
This is an article about 29 Rackham Street, W10. Frank Hatton, who lived at 29 Rackham Street remembers:

Our house, and its neighbours, were known as tenement houses, in that each floor of the four story house was occupied by different families. There was a front door to which each family had a key. There were no door bells in those days, but each front door had a ’knocker’, and if you wished to call on the family on the first floor, you would knock once, if it was for the second floor, you would knock twice, and three times for the third floor, and four for the fourth or top floor.. There were just two toilets to serve the whole house, and the families would take turns in keeping them clean. There was no bathroom at all, so each family would have a large moveable metal bath, and once a week this would be be filled with hot water, which was boiled up in the kettle (no running hot water in those days) and it took around 20 to 30 kettles to fill the bath, and then the whole family would take turns to use the same wat...
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FEBRUARY
11
2016

 

Exmoor Street, W10
Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10 St Charles Hospital was built in Exmoor Street in 1879.

The hospital was built by the Board of Guardians of the Poor Law Union of St. Marylebone as an infirmary for the sick poor of that parish, no site being then available in St. Marylebone itself.

Until 1922 it was known as St. Marylebone Infirmary. In 1923 it was renamed St. Marylebone Hospital, and when it was taken over in 1930 by the London County Council under the Local Government Act of the previous year it was given its present name of St Charles Hospital.
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FEBRUARY
10
2016

 

Silvester Mews, W11
Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11. On the 1900s Charles Booth map, Silvester Mews was marked as extremely poor. By the tme that the 1950 Ordnance Survey was released, the Mews had been redeveloped and replaced by Silvester House.
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FEBRUARY
9
2016

 

Golden Mews, W11
Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11. It was redeveloped in the twenty first century and renamed "Golden Cross Mews", becoming a gated community.
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FEBRUARY
8
2016

 

Blackburn Road, NW6
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane. It was first laid out by the builder it was named after in 1885, a Mr. Blackburn.

F. R. Napier, had opened a plating shop behind West Hampstead fire station in 1919, took the site for his Hampstead Plating Works, which was founded in 1940.
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FEBRUARY
6
2016

 

6 East Row, W10
6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area. The plot was later absorbed into the expansion of the Emslie Horniman Pleasance park.
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FEBRUARY
5
2016

 

Bevington Road, W10
Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10 It runs from Golborne Road in the northwest and formerly ran on to Acklam Road - today though it ends in a cul-de-sac.

At the western end, a pub called the Carnarvon Castle separated it from Portobello Road. Also near that end is Bevington Primary School, built on the site of a former side street called Angola Mews.
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FEBRUARY
2
2016

 

Lavie Mews, W10
Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road. Lavie Mews was a tiny mews with bends in it, serving a warehouse.

It disappeared as part of the Wornington Estate redevelopments in the early 1970s.
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Luxurious sewers
The effluent society Although the march of new housing was approaching North Kensington by the 1820s, there was a serious practical impediment to development. The upper classes no longer expected to throw their human and household waste out of the windows, or into local streams. Closed sewers were an essential requirement for a successful building enterprise, but they were expensive to create.

However, a piece of good fortune came along. In 1836 the Birmingham Bristol and Thames Junction Railway was set up to provide a railway line between Willesden and the Thames. Railways were the “internet bubble” of the age and started up and went bust in rapid succession. The proposed route ran just to the west of the Norland Estate and through the Holland Estate near Addison Road. This happened to be the route of Counter’s Creek, a stream which served as the local sewer and rubbish dump. The Commissioners of Sewers insisted the railway company had to divert the stream and build a covered sewer further...
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910)
2015 The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Bangor Street
2015 This photo is captioned in the London City Mission magazine from 1911:
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Bangor Street
2015 The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner this photo was taken from.

Date unknown.
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Corner of Bangor and Sirdar Road
2015 The location became the Dolphin Pub.

This picture is captioned in the London City Mission magazine
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Acklam Road protests
Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway Flats in the Acklam Road section of the Western Avenue Extension are decorated with banners put up by residents, protesting against the new road, on the day of the opening ceremony at Paddington Green.

The 2.5 mile long
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s)
Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway North Kensington was, for a while in the early 1970s, a centre for activist graffiti.
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Fowell Street, W10
Fowell Street, W10 was redeveloped in the 1970s. James Fowell a builder from Gray’s Inn Road, moved to Ponders End with the profits from Fowell Street, which he built.
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Sections of The Underground Map text are taken, adapted or remixed from the Wikipedia. Other sections are written by the authors and users of The Underground Map. The Underground Map hereby gives permission for the re-use of all material which is attributed on its website under the Creative Commons License/CC-BY-3.0.