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APRIL
30
2016

 

Paddington
The first underground railway station in the world ran from Paddington - opened as Paddington (Bishop's Road) by the Metropolitan Railway on 10 January 1863 as the terminus of the company's route from Farringdon. Paddington mainline railway station - Paddington station - has a commuter service serving stations west of London, a mainline service to Oxford, Bristol, Bath, Taunton, Devon, Cornwall and South Wales. There is also an express rail line to Heathrow Airport.

In Paddington Station there is a display case showing Paddington Bear, a character of children's fiction who, in the book, is first discovered at this station and hence named after it.

Important places in Paddington include St Mary's Hospital - where penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming - and Paddington Green police station.

Alan Turing, the pioneer mathematician was born in Warrington Crescent.
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APRIL
25
2016

 

The 'Royal Blue' horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road (1912)
The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge's. The shops behind, including Boots the Chemist, Stewart & Wright's Cocoa Rooms and the Northumberland Hotel, are covered in advertisements.
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APRIL
23
2016

 

Bullbaiters Farm
Bullbaiters Farm near Boreham Wood was originally called Bullbeggar's Farm - Bullbeggar meaning 'hobgoblin' or 'scarecrow'. Above the central door was the Byng family crest - onwers of the farm, who were based in Wrotham Park, South Mimms.

In the 1861 census, the occupant of Bullbaiters Farm was 60 year old William King, who farmed 190 acres and employed 3 men and 2 boys. In addition to his family two farm labourers also lived in the farm. Thrift Farm, nearby, was occupied by a farm labourer according to the census - so it may have been used as a farm cottage. Quite often, especially involving what had been smaller tenanted farms, the fields would be combined into a larger farm and the 'redundant' farm house used as farm cottages.
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APRIL
19
2016

 

Avenue Farm
Cowhouse Farm was linked to Hodford Farm in Golders Green for a long period. As Cricklewood suburbanised, the farm became surrounded by housing. Latterly Dickers Farm and finally Avenue Farm, it was closed in 1932.

Its access track finally became Farm Avenue.
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APRIL
17
2016

 

Lothrop Street (1907)
2015 Postcode of a street in the Queen’s Park Estate
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APRIL
10
2016

 

Barnet Gate Wood
This small woodland is public open space, owned and managed by Barnet Council. It is a remnant of the extensive Middlesex Forest which covered most of this area after the last Ice Age.

Barnet Gate Wood is a small ancient woodland, with a canopy of oak and hornbeam, and an understorey dominated by rhododendron. Some of the hornbeam are in strange shapes as they were originally trained as hedges and then allowed go wild.

The entrance is by a path from Hendon Wood Lane, near the junction with Barnet Road. There is also access from the Dollis Valley Greenwalk and London Loop, at wooden posts numbered 12 and 13, which are points on the Barnet Gate Wood Nature Trail.

Barnet Gate Wood is part of Moat Mount Open Space and Mote End Farm, a Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Borough Grade II.

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APRIL
7
2016

 

Highwood Hill, NW7
Highwood Hill links the Rising Sun pub with Totteridge. “It is no uncommon thing to see 100 loads of hay go up to London on market day and each of the teams bring back a load of dung for dressing the land”, writes John Middleton in his "View of the Agriculture of Middlesex" (1798).

Hay farming, he says, was mixed with sheep farming; pig farming too “purchased fat by the hog­butchers of London”.

Some got rich through hay farming and some built many large mansions along Totteridge Lane, Highwood Hill and The Ridgeway. The landlords of these properties were allowed to enclose fields all over the area and the common lands, where the poor could graze their pigs, cows and geese, became much smaller and fewer, impoverishing those dependent on such land.

Lavish parks were laid out around their mansions, and the residents dammed streams to form ornamental waters and planted trees on the common
pastures - evidence of these trees and pools can be seen today.

Totteridge&rs...
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