The Underground Map


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The Underground Map
The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London lying inside the M25.

There are now over 16 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, you can use the map control by clicking on markers to change location or choose different historical views.

If you wish to contribute to the project, you can use a Facebook login to authorise The Underground Map app and tell other users the story of your area, street or house.
N.B. The app is simply used to authorise users and will not post to Facebook.

Explore old maps of London
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1750s
‘A plan of the cities of London and Westminster, and borough of Southwark’, surveyed by John Rocque and engraved by John Pine in 1746.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1800s
Richard Horwood’s ‘PLAN of the Cities of LONDON and WESTMINSTER the Borough of SOUTHWARK, and PARTS adjoining Shewing every HOUSE’ was produced between 1792 and 1799.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1830s
Greenwood's map of London, 1827, surveyed over the previous two years.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1860s
Edward Stanford's Library Map of London and its Suburbs, 1862.
View the map.
VIEW LONDON IN THE 1900s
Ordnance Survey Map of London, Five feet to the Mile, 1893-1896.
View the map.

Featured articles

AUGUST
29
2016

 

Arundel Gardens, W11
Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s. By the 1850s, the Ladbroke family was beginning to sell off freehold parcels of undeveloped land, one of which consisted of the land between the south side of Arundel Gardens and the north side of Ladbroke Gardens.

This was acquired in 1852 by Richard Roy, a solicitor who had already been involved in building speculation in Cheltenham. He appears to have done nothing with the Arundel Gardens part of his land until 1862-3, when building leases were granted for the houses on the south side (numbers 1-47). Around the same time, leases were granted to three other builders to build houses on the north side (Edwin Ware for Nos. 2-14). The survey done by the Ordnance Survey in 1863 shows that the south side was complete by then, but only a few houses had been built on the north side, at the Kensington Park Road end. Building clearly proceeded apace, however, as an 1865 plan, done when the street was given its current name and numbers (it was originally called Lansdowne Road T...
»more


AUGUST
26
2016

 

Boreham Wood Baptist Church
The Baptist Church, situated on the corner of Furzehill Road, opened on 14 July 1911. The first baptist chapel was in Station Road, (formerly Gas Works Lane), built by members in memory of Mrs Godfrey, The small chapel was converted into a cinema and called The Little Gem and then became a public toilet and later a flower shop.

The Baptist Church was demolished to make way for Furzehill Parade.
»read full article


AUGUST
26
2016

 

68 Shenley Road, WD6
68 Shenley Road was a shop on the corner of Furzehill Road - now disappeared. Later split into three separate shops, Buckingham House covered the present addresses 60-62 Shenley Road and the now demolished number 64. Buckingham House was the name that Richard Lidstone, a drapers, called his new shop which occupied the plot and went up soon after the turn of the twentieth century.

After the Second World War, George Lilley’s was occupying the corner plot of 64 Shenley Road - 62 and 60 had split off into other premises. Lilley’s was an electrical shop which by the 1950s was selling and repairing televisions.

In 1958, the entire block of buildings along Shenley Road between Furzehill Road and Drayton Road was demolished and replaced.

Lilleys was on the corner of Furzehill then Kilbys grocers shop, Co op shoe shop then some cottages, Misses Byers sweet shop with the big tree in front amongst the cottages, Hunts Butchers shop and then Drayton Road.
»read full article


AUGUST
24
2016

 

Vauxhall Gardens
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century. Originally known as New Spring Gardens, the site was believed to have opened before the Restoration of 1660 with the first mention being made by Samuel Pepys in 1662.

The Gardens consisted of several acres of trees and shrubs with attractive walks. Initially, entrance was free with food and drink being sold to support the venture.

The site became Vauxhall Gardens in 1785 and admission was charged to gain its many attractions. The Gardens drew all manner of men and supported enormous crowds, with its paths being noted for romantic assignations. Tightrope walkers, hot air balloon ascents, concerts and fireworks provided amusement. The rococo Turkish tent became one of the Gardens' structures, the interior of the Rotunda became one of Vauxhall's most viewed attractions, and the chinoiserie style was a feature of several buildings.

Enormous crowds could be accommodated. In 1749 a rehearsal of Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks attra...
»more


Sections of The Underground Map text are taken, adapted or remixed from the Wikipedia. Other sections are written by the authors and users of The Underground Map. The Underground Map hereby gives permission for the re-use of all material which is attributed on its website under the Creative Commons License/CC-BY-3.0.