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OCTOBER
28
2016

 

Junction Road, N19
Junction Road is a section of the A400 road running between Archway tube station and Tufnell Park tube station. The street has a number of restaurants, bars and pubs. Junction Road is home to Archway Tower, a building whose divisive appearance caused a debate as to whether it should be demolished.

Junction Road railway station stood on the corner of Junction Road and Station Road until its closure in 1943. It was on what is now London Overgroundís Gospel Oak to Barking line, between Gospel Oak station and Upper Holloway station.

Read the Junction Road entry on the Wikipedia...
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OCTOBER
18
2016

 

Wentworth Street (1901)
Turn-of-the-century fashion in east London. The earliest depiction of Wentworth Street appears c.1560, bounded by hedges. The area immediately east of Petticoat Lane (Middlesex Street) was built up by the 1640s with substantial houses divided by yards and gardens. The southern side of Wentworth Street had properties whereas the northern side formed the boundary of the Tenter Ground, an open space used for stretching and drying silk (there were several 'tenter grounds' in the immediate area).

The northern side east of Brick Lane formed the southern boundary of the Fossan Estate.

The street was so named after Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Cleveland who owned much land in the area in the 1630s and 1640s, although early maps call it 'Wentford Street' and 'Winford Street', probably both unintentional errors.

The entire length of Wentworth Street from Petticoat Lane to Brick Lane was strongly defined by buildings by the 1740s. By the 19th century, much of the street had fallen on hard times, ...
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OCTOBER
8
2016

 

St Benet Sherehog
St Benet Sherehog was a medieval parish church built before the year 1111 in Cordwainer Ward, in what was then the wool-dealing district. A shere hog is a castrated ram after its first shearing.
The church was originally dedicated to St Osyth. Sise Lane in the parish uses an abbreviated form of the saintís name. The historian John Stow believed that the later dedication of "Benet Sherehog" was derived from a corruption of the name of Bennet Shorne, a benefactor of the church in the reign of Edward II.

The patronage of the church belonged to the monastery of St Mary Overy until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown.

Matthew Griffith chaplain to Charles I was rector from 1640 until 1642, when he was removed from the post and imprisoned after preaching a sermon entitled "A Pathetical Persuasion to Pray for Publick Peace" in St Paulís Cathedral.

St Benetís was one of the 86 parish churches destroyed in the Great Fire of London, and it was not selected to be rebuilt when the 1670 Act of Parliament became law. The parish was united to that of St Stephen Walbrook in th...
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