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FEBRUARY
13
2018

 

Orpington
Orpington is a town and electoral ward in the London Borough of Bromley in Greater London and lies at the south-eastern edge of London’s urban area. Stone Age tools have been found in several areas of Orpington, including Goddington Park, Priory Gardens, the Ramsden estate, and Poverest. Early Bronze Age pottery fragments have been found in the Park Avenue area. During the building of Ramsden Boys School in 1956, the remains of an Iron Age farmstead were excavated. The area was occupied in Roman times, as shown by Crofton Roman Villa and the Roman bath-house at Fordcroft.

During the Anglo-Saxon period, Fordcroft Anglo-Saxon cemetery was used in the area.

The first record of the name Orpington occurs in 1038, when King Cnut’s treasurer Eadsy gave land at "Orpedingetune" to the Monastery of Christ Church at Canterbury. The parish church also pre-dates the Domesday Book. On 22 July 1573, Queen Elizabeth I was entertained at Bark Hart (Orpington Priory) and her horses stabled at the Anchor and Hope Inn (Orpington High Street). On the southern edge of Orpington, Green St Green is recorded as ’...
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FEBRUARY
12
2018

 

Willoughby Street, WC1B
Willoughby Street was formerly known as both Vine Street and Wooburn Street. Willoughby Street was laid out in the southwest of Bloomsbury, on the Duke of Bedford’s estate, running between Great Russell Street and Streatham Street.

Its line was then continued south by Charlotte Mews and subsequently by Vine Street

It was developed in the late seventeenth century as part of the development around Bedford Square (then Southampton Square) and on Horwood’s maps of 1799–1819, it is shown as Wooburn Street.

Both the St Giles parish map of 1720 and Rocque’s map of 1746 call the whole street Vine Street, from Broad Street to Great Russell Street

It was renamed after Mr Willoughby, Holborn’s Mayor, in 1904. Further into the twentieth century, it remained a quiet street with few buildings.
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FEBRUARY
11
2018

 

Woburn Walk, WC1H
Woburn Walk was also known as Woburn Buildings. It was developed by Thomas Cubitt in 1822, and named after the Bedford family seat. Woburn Walk is situated in the north of Bloomsbury, on the north-eastern edge of the Duke of Bedford’s estate.

It was built as a parade of shops with living accommodation above, which it remains today. No. 1 was the home of radical and reformer George Jacob Holyoake; he is listed there in the 1851 and 1861 censuses. No. 5 (now part of the Ambassadors Hotel) was the home of W. B. Yeats from 1895 to 1919, as commemorated by a blue plaque.
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FEBRUARY
10
2018

 

Ireland Yard, EC4V
Ireland Yard is an alleyway leading off of Playhouse Yard. When the Black Friars monastery was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1538, most of the buildings were left to decay, whilst some of those occupying the outer fringes of the grounds were given to people who happened to be in the King’s favour at the time. One such beneficiary was Sir Thomas Carwardine who on a nod and a wink came away from the royal chamber clutching the title deeds to the priory church and east gatehouse.

Having little regard for ancient buildings he promptly pulled down the church and was on the verge of doing the same with the gatehouse, but on seconds thoughts decided to make it his home. Later in the century the refurbished ’house’ was sold to William Ireland, a City haberdasher, who stepped out of his door one day only to be frightened out of his wits by a bearded gentleman cuddling a skull and spouting forth about ghosts. He was not aware of it at the time but this petrifying fellow was none other than William Shakespeare who, to Ireland’s disma...
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FEBRUARY
9
2018

 

Argyll Road, W8
Argyll Road was built as part of the development of the Phillimore Estate. Many of the other roads in the estate run between Phillimore Gardens and Argyll Road. Argyll Road is broken up by these roads on its west side, but the east side is virtually one long, undivided terrace. The slope of the road means that the terrace is stepped every four houses or so. There is a generous area and forecourt (or garden) in front of the houses.

Almost the whole of the east side was built by Jeremiah Little between 1858 and 1862. James Jordan built Nos. 2-4, 6 and 7.

On the west side, the houses were all apparently built by Henry Little between 1860 and 1862.

The houses are not all in the same style. Below Stafford Terrace are Nos. 1 to 7 (consec) they are relatively small, being on four floors (basement to second) with a dormer room in some instances. The houses were designed in a Georgian style, so they have no bay windows. Instead they generally have porches supported by plain Doric-style columns which extend beyond the front...
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FEBRUARY
8
2018

 

Jubilee Crescent, E14
Jubilee Crescent was built in 1935 by architect G R Unthank. Local ship repairing firm, R. & H. Green & Silley Weir Ltd were based in Blackwall and were part of a long shipbuilding tradition. R. and H. Green Ltd was formed from the long-established Blackwall firm of Wigram and Green who were famous shipbuilders in the 19th century, however with the decline of Thames shipbuilding in the early 20th century, R. & H. Green became part of a ship repairing partnership called R. and H. Green and Silley Weir.

It was the chairman of the firm, John Silley, who was determined to provide homes for retired workers of the shipbuilding and repairing industries. John Silley was a committed Christian who contributed toward the YMCA and numerous other charities. Silley had already built some dwellings for his workers in Falmouth and chose the Isle of Dogs to build a series of dwellings.

Silley approached the Port of London Authority and persuaded them to give him 1.5 acres on the edge of the Mudchute in exchange for some land ow...
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FEBRUARY
7
2018

 

St Paul’s Church
St Paul’s Church is an Anglican church of the Anglo-Catholic tradition located at 32a Wilton Place. The church was founded in 1843, the first in London to champion the ideals of the Oxford Movement, during the incumbency of the Reverend W. J. E. Bennett. The architect was Thomas Cundy the younger.

A memorial in St Paul’s Church commemorates 52 members of the First Aid Nursing Yeomanry who died on active service in World War II, carrying out secret intelligence work for the Special Operations Executive in occupied countries as well as providing transport drivers for the ATS. It includes three holders of the George Cross.
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FEBRUARY
6
2018

 

Silk Stream (1916)
The Silk Stream was the stream which fed the Welsh Harp reservoir. The photographer is standing on an embankment on Colindeep Lane where it bridges the stream. The view looks south along the stream towards the bridge in the far distance which carries the Edgware Road over the start of the Welsh Harp. The expanse of water of the reservoir can be seen beyond that.

This very rural scene depicts a section of the stream which once widened to form the Welsh Harp earlier than now. This side of the Edgware Road the reservoir has been reclaimed to site industry.
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FEBRUARY
6
2018

 

Beresford Square, SE18
Beresford Square was formed in the early 19th century and was named after the Anglo-Irish general William Beresford, Master-General of the Ordnance and Governor of the Royal Military Academy. Beresford Square was not a laid-out square but the result of a series of clearances. Therefore, some of the buildings are older than the square. In 1812-13, some "paltry buildings" around the road junction near the main entrance to the Arsenal were demolished for "encroachment on Crown land". The northern section of the road that wound down from Woolwich Common to Plumstead Road was called Green’s End.

The northernmost tip, now the west side of Beresford Square, was known as the High Pavement. Land to the east of this road was part of the Burrage Estate, named after its 14th-century owner, Bartholomew de Burghersh. The Salutation Inn stood almost at the northern end of the High Pavement. It had a tea garden and may have been Woolwich’s first theatre, mentioned in 1721. The garden later became Salutation Alley with about 20 timber cottages. In one of these Henry Maudslay was born in 1771. Living conditions here were appalling, as described in the Booth Surve...
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FEBRUARY
5
2018

 

Richmond
Richmond lies on a meander of the River Thames, with a view protected by a specific Act of Parliament.

Richmond was founded following Henry VII's building of Richmond Palace in the 16th century, from which the town derives its name. (The Palace itself was named after Henry's earldom of Richmond, North Yorkshire.) During this era the town and palace were particularly associated with Elizabeth I, who spent her last days here. During the 18th century Richmond Bridge was completed and many Georgian terraces were built, particularly around Richmond Green and on Richmond Hill. These remain well preserved and many have listed building architectural or heritage status. The opening of the railway station in 1846 was a significant event in the absorption of the town into a rapidly expanding London.

Richmond was formerly part of the ancient parish of Kingston upon Thames in the county of Surrey. In 1890 the town became a municipal borough, which was later extended to include Kew, Ham, Petersham and part of Mortlake (North Sheen). The municipal borough was abolished ...
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FEBRUARY
4
2018

 

Purves Road, NW10
Purves Road is named after the solicitor of the United Land Company who were developers in this area. After 1888, when the surrender of a farm lease allowed construction north of the railway line, All Souls’ College began to exploit its lands. It built Chamberlayne Road, which connected Kensal with Willesden Green and eventually boasted a pleasant little shopping centre, as well as some light industry. This new area of development was given the name of Kensal Rise. Kensal Green station was renamed Kensal Rise in 1890.

The land for Purves Road was sold by All Souls College and the builders were Vigers. The All Souls’ estate now stretches from Kensal Green to Harlesden.

The road was the site of the Princess Frederica School.
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FEBRUARY
3
2018

 

Saville Road, E16
Saville Road is famous as the street featured in the credits of the TV series "Call The Midwife". When originally laid out, Saville Road crossed Drew Road meeting the boundary of the dock. Drew Road School was situated in this ’lost’ section of Saville Road.

Saville Road is the setting for a famous photograph of the Dominion Monarch in the King George V Dry Dock, pictured immediately behind Saville Road’s dock fence. The ship was part of the Shaw Saville Line. The Dominion Monarch was launched in 1939 and broken up in 1962. It was in the King George V dock for a clean up of its bottom and a repaint.

The dock has now been partially filled in and the DLR station for the City Airport can now be seen from the street instead of the dock.


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FEBRUARY
2
2018

 

Richmond Bridge
Richmond Bridge is the oldest surviving Thames bridge in London. Richmond Bridge is an 18th-century stone arch bridge that crosses the River Thames at Richmond, connecting the two halves of the present-day London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It was designed by James Paine and Kenton Couse.

The bridge, which is a Grade I listed, was built between 1774 and 1777, as a replacement for a ferry crossing which connected Richmond town centre on the east bank with its neighbouring district of East Twickenham to the west. Its construction was privately funded by a ’tontine’ scheme, for which tolls were charged until 1859. Because the river meanders from its general west to east direction, flowing from southeast to northwest in this part of London, what would otherwise be known as the north and south banks are often referred to as the "Middlesex" (Twickenham) and "Surrey" (Richmond) banks respectively, named after the historic counties to which each side once belonged.

The bridge was widened and slightly flattened...
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FEBRUARY
1
2018

 

Caldwell Street, SW9
Caldwell Street was originally called Holland Street. It was built just before the 1830s dawned and was named Holland Street after Henry Richard Vassall, the third Baron Holland who owned this area.

The road was once a shopping street and was renamed Caldwell Street in the 1930s.

Only a small section of the original street remains on the western side and a tiny cottage on the far eastern end by Brixton Road.
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