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Website · Pimlico · NW6 · Contributed by Scott Hatton
MARCH
16
2017



The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
There are now over 23 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - use the Google Map control to change to a particular decade.The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

MARCH
13
2018

 

St Mark Street, E1
St Mark Street was built on the old Goodman’s Fields. A House of Minoresses (from where the street name Minories derives) was established in Aldgate in 1293, by Edward I’s brother Edmund, Duke of Lancaster and his French wife Blanche of Navarre. The King granted them freedom from taxation and tithes. After Edmund died in 1296, many significant medieval figures, particularly women, were buried within the convent walls, including in 1360 Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Clare and founder of Clare College Cambridge in 1360, and Anne Mowbray, Duchess of York and wife of the younger prince murdered in the Tower in 1481. The House continued to attract the widows and daughters of the wealthy, and gradually increased its holdings of land, rents and tenements.

After the Dissolution, the nunnery was surrendered to Henry VIII by the last abbess, Dame Elizabeth Salvage, in 1539, who was subsequently granted a pension of £40, and the nunnery became the residence of John Clark, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Henry VIII’s ambassador to th...
»more


MARCH
12
2018

 

Goodman’s Fields Theatre
Two 18th century theatres bearing the name Goodman’s Fields Theatre were located on Alie Street, Whitechapel. The first opened on 31 October 1727 in a small shop by Thomas Odell, ’Deputy Licenser of Plays’. The first play performed was George Farquhar’s The Recruiting Officer. Henry Fielding’s second play The Temple Beau premièred here 26 January 1730. Upon retirement, Odell passed the management on to Henry Giffard, after a sermon was preached against the theatre at St Botolph’s, Aldgate. Giffard operated the theatre until 1732. After he left, the theatre was used for a variety of acrobatic performances.

Giffard constructed a new theatre down the street designed by Edward Shepherd who also designed the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. The theatre opened with Henry IV, Part I, 2 October 1732 that included actors Thomas Walker, Richard Yates and Harry Woodward. A dispute at the Drury Lane Theatre bought the actress Sarah Thurmond and her husband to the theatre. With the passing of the Licensing Act of 1737, the theatre was forced to close. Giffard rented Linc...
»more


MARCH
11
2018

 

Dowgate Hill, EC4R
Dowgate Hill is a continuation of Walbrook along the west side of Cannon Street Station, leading to Dowgate Dock. In records from 1150 and 1312 the name appears as Douegate. Also named Downgate by Stow “from its steep descent to the River.”

The supposed antiquity of Dowgate as the Dwr-gate or water gate to Watling Street of the Britons (Welsh Dwr = water gate) is somewhat doubtful as there is no evidence that this place existed previous to the Roman occupation.

In Wren’s Parentalia it is stated that the Romans had a gate in the wall next the Thames and this gate was called Dew-gate or anciently Dour-gate which signified the water gate into the City. The Walbrook joined the Thames at this Dock. Here was the water gate where the ferry from Surrey landed the travellers for the City.

Dowgate was the old port of the Normans and was utilized by the citizens of Rouen. Earlier anchorage for ships belonging to the merchants of the Hansa Steel Yard. In Dowgate Hill are three City Company’s Halls.
»read full article


MARCH
10
2018

 

Budge Row, EC4N
Budge Row lies off the north side of Cannon Street, about 80 yards west of the main line station. About 500 years ago the area surrounding here was closely associated with the clothing trade. If you had walked along Cannon Street in those times you would probably have seen a representation of few other trades than drapers and skin merchants selling their wares. In the adjoining alleys and courts the wives of traders would be busy throughout the day and night making up articles of clothing for the stalls. It was no coincidence, but for local convenience, that the Skinners Company, in 1327, established their Hall in nearby Dowgate Hill and have held their gatherings there ever since.

Women of the day were restricted in their choice of clothing according to their status. In 1338, and again twenty years later, the City authorities ordered that women of low standing should not wear clothing made from buge or wool. If the like had bought an old fur coat for a penny or two at the local jumble sale her fate could well have been a prison sentence for wearing it.

»more


MARCH
9
2018

 

Amersham Workhouse
The Amersham Workhouse was situated on the site of Amersham Hospital. The Union Workhouse was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott who also designed the Albert Memorial in Hyde Park and St Pancras Station in London. It was built in 1838 and served a number of local parishes and provided basic care of the elderly and those unable to work.

It was built following the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834 which obliged parishes to form a "union" to build a workhouse. The Amersham Union included the parishes of Chesham, Beaconsfield, the Chalfonts and Penn. Typically, a Union Workhouse was built in the largest town of the Union. In Amersham’s case this should have been Chesham, but Amersham was chosen.

The Union Workhouse replaced the many work houses around the parishes, with the "inmates" being moved from their local towns, sometimes leaving them for the first time in their lives. Owing to the location of the "union" Workhouse, Whielden Street was for a time known as Union Street. The name reverted to Whielden Street (named after...
»more


MARCH
8
2018

 

Park Grove, DA7
Park Grove is part of the Martens Grove Estate, build in the 1930s. The Martens Grove Estate was built by Aylings, but many other builders firms were active nearby, including Ellingham, H. Owen and New Ideal Homesteads.

The Estate was built on what had been ancient woodlands, part of the grounds of Martens Grove, a very large house of the 1850s.
»read full article


MARCH
7
2018

 

South Kenton
South Kenton is an area of the London Borough of Harrow which is served by South Kenton station. Kenton hamlet was recorded as "Keninton" in 1232. The name derives from the personal name of the Saxon "Coena" and the Old English "tun", a farm – and means "the farm of Coena" and his family who once lived on a site near here.

Before the 20th century, the tiny settlement was concentrated around in what was Kenton Lane (the easternmost part of which remains as Old Kenton Lane to the east of Kingsbury station) and is now part of the present day Woodgrange Avenue and Kenton Road.

The Plough public house was Kenton’s first, opening in the early 18th century though the current building is not the original.

Kenton station was opened by the London and North Western Railway on 15 June 1912. The Metropolitan Railway’s Northwick Park and Kenton station (later renamed Northwick Park) followed on 28 June 1923.

The London County Council built the Kenmore Park cottage estate between the wars. There are 654 houses on the 23 ...
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MARCH
6
2018

 

Moor Park
Moor Park takes its name from a country house which was originally built in 1678–9 for James, Duke of Monmouth, and was reconstructed in the Palladian style circa 1720 by Giacomo Leoni. The house was built on what used to be an area of Ruislip Moor, which is where the name Moor Park originates. The house and grounds are now occupied by Moor Park Golf Club.

The Moor Park Estate was built after Moor Park and Sandy Lodge station was opened on 9 May 1910 after, in September 1887, the Metropolitan Railway’s extension opened from the previous terminus at Pinner, en route to Rickmansworth.
»read full article


MARCH
5
2018

 

Selby Square, W10
Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate It lies between buildings in the Queen’s Park estate with the walkway lying almost opposite the entrance to Onslow Close and connects Severn Avenue and Dowland Street.

There is a small playground here.
»read full article


MARCH
4
2018

 

Figges Marsh
Figges Marsh is a park in Mitcham. Figges Marsh is just over 10 hectares in size and its open space has an outdoor gym and outdoor table tennis.

It was named after William Figge who occupied the land from 1357. Present-day Carlingford Gardens and Manship Road mark the boundary between Figge’s property and that of the medieval Biggin Farm estate.

As part of Mitcham Common, Figges Marsh was used for grazing until 1923 when the urban district council assumed control. Most of the land was left as meadow until mechanical mowing became possible in the 1940s. Around this time, the surrounding area began to be built up with housing, much of which was erected by the council.
»read full article


MARCH
3
2018

 

George Court, WC2N
George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham. Villers acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets.

»read full article


MARCH
2
2018

 

Devonshire Hill Lane, N17
Devonshire Hill Lane was laid out along the line of a former farm track. Much of the modern road pattern of Tottenham had been established by 1619. High Road ran northward in the east and Green Lanes, dividing at the later junction of Wood Green High Road and Bounds Green Road, in the west; between them routes corresponding to the later White Hart and Lordship lanes and West Green and St. Ann’s roads crossed the middle of the parish.

The western part of White Hart Lane was then called Apeland Street as far as the parsonage house, whence a lane later marked by the modern Devonshire Hill Lane led to the Edmonton border at Clay Hill.

Up to the 1920s, the area north of White Hart Lane from the site of Rectory Farm was a landscape of fields with few houses. Devonshire Hill Lane wound its narrow, tree-lined way northwards for half a mile from White Hart Lane, terminating at Devonshire Hill Farm.

After WW1, Local Authorities, under Government direction and subsidy, embarked on a programme of Public Housing developme...
»more


MARCH
1
2018

 

Brownlow Road, WD6
Brownlow Road was built together with Drayton Road. Drayton Road was laid out to run parallel to Furzehill Road from a junction with Shenley Road. To enable traffic to traverse Drayton Road, a second street - Brownlow Road was built to connect the southern end with Furzehill Road.

In 1896, Charles Braithwaite who owned the Boreham Wood Engine Works and Loco Packing Company in Drayton Road, built houses for employees in Furzehill Road and Brownlow Road.
»read full article


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