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APRIL
16
2018

 

Ansleigh Place, W11
Ansleigh Place is an ex mews to the west of Notting Dale. Originally the stable house accommodation for the main houses on Stoneleigh Street, the primary purpose of the Mews properties is now residential.

In World War II, a high explosive bomb fell onto Treadgold Street, north-east of the Mews. When the London Poverty Maps were published, the area was noted as having a mixture of normal living conditions and lower than average household salaries.

The 1987 film ‘Withnail & I’ used Ansleigh Place as a filming location.
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APRIL
15
2018

 

Egerton Crescent, SW3
Egerton Crescent was described in 2013 as "the most expensive street in Britain". The street runs roughly north to south in a curve, with both ends forming t-junctions on Egerton Gardens, which in turn runs roughly north to south between Egerton Terrace and Brompton Road.

The houses were designed by George Basevi and built by James Bonnin in the 1840s, when it was called Brompton Crescent, but was renamed Egerton Crescent in 1896 in honour of Francis Egerton, 3rd Duke of Bridgewater.

In 2013, property here cost more than 74 times the price of the average home in the UK.

By December 2015, it had been demoted to be the second most expensive street in England, with an average property price of £7,550,000, according to research from Lloyds Bank, based on Land Registry data..
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APRIL
14
2018

 

Sands End
Sands End was a close knit working class community. Once a rural backwater called Sandy End, it became the industrial heart of Fulham with its gas works, power station and petrol depot providing work for generations of local families.

A property boom beginning in the 1970s coupled with the advent of oil fueled processing of North Sea oil led to an inexorable process of gentrification with offices and studio businesses and flats on the market for more than £2.4 million.

On the bank of the Thames is Hurlingham Retail Park, which includes Currys and PC World. There is also a business enterprise centre in the Sulivan district. Across the other side of Townmead Road there is a large Sainsbury’s, and Imperial Wharf, a brownfield development of the former Imperial Gasworks which is growing to include a mixture of affordable housing, both private and public, shops, a park and a new railway station.
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APRIL
13
2018

 

Nicoll Farm
Nicoll Farm is one of the earliest locations recorded in the Borehamwood area. Nicoll (Nicholl) Farm was built on land owned by Lord Aldenham. The farmhouse was built c.1500 with a crosswing added a century later. There was an early and mid eighteenth century extension, and 19th and 20th century additions.

The farm was interesting geologically as it occupied land suitable for growing crops whereas the surrounding area was mostly clay. Later in its life, it had an equestrian speciality.

By 1908, the farm was tenanted out to Joseph Still. Later the tenancy went to Douglas Dalton who was known for both his pigsty and his sausages.

Despite being green belt, a housing development was built on the site in the 2010s.
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APRIL
12
2018

 

The Fascination of Chelsea
The Fascination of Chelsea was a book published in 1902. It was written by Geraldine E. Mitton. It was part of the "Fascination of London" series edited by Walter Besant and published posthumously in 1902 following his death the previous year.

The original publishers were Adam & Charles Black (London).

The Spectator published the following contemporary review: "The Fascination of London : Chelsea. By G. E. Mitten. Edited by Sir W. Besant. (A. and C. Black. ls. 6d. net.)—This volitme, one of four on the same scale and with substantially the same author; ship, Mr. Mitten collaborating with Sir W. Besant, or having his work supervised by him, is an earnest of the great work on the Metropolis which Sir W. Besant contemplated. Each parish was to be perambulated and made the subject of a small book, Chelsea being chosen as a specimen, with . Hampstead, Westminster, and the Strand district. This is a very pleasant little book, the work of.a competent observer, who knows what to look for and how to deal with what be ...
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APRIL
11
2018

 

Abchurch Yard, EC4N
First mentioned in 1732, Abchurch Yard was built on the St Mary Abchurch churchyard. Although not one of the City’s most secluded byways, it is ideally situated at the side of a tiny lane – an antique area that has changed little in layout since the 12th century.

The bulk of Abchurch Yard, a paved square lying to the south of St Mary Abchurch, was once the graveyard to this outstanding church, and now, during the summer months, is prettily decked with tubs of colourful flowers. From the seats arranged along the church wall you can take time out to watch the scurrying lunchtime herds. Leading from the ‘square’, along the west side of Wren’s red bricked church, is the old churchyard path, now formed as a narrow lane but retaining, through its name, a link with centuries past.

The present church was built in 1681 after its predecessor was destroyed on the 3rd September 1666, a victim of the Great Fire. Although it is one of the smallest of Wren’s City churches, the almost square interior is made to appear spacious by the great do...
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APRIL
10
2018

 

St Mary Mounthaw
St Mary Mounthaw or Mounthaut was a parish church in Old Fish Street Hill. The church was originally built as a chapel for the house of the Mounthaunt family, from Norfolk, from whom the church took its name. In around 1234 the house and the patronage of the church were bought by Ralph de Maydenstone, Bishop of Hereford. He left it to his successors as bishop, who used the house as their London residence. One of them, John Skypp, personal chaplain to (and champion of) Anne Boleyn, was buried in the church.

The church was enlarged and partly rebuilt in 1609, partly at the cost of Robert Bennet, Bishop of Hereford. The next year new glass was installed, at the cost of Thomas Tyler and Richard Tichburne.

Along with the majority of the 97 parish churches in the City of London, St Mary Mounthaw was destroyed by the Great Fire in September 1666. In 1670 a Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. St Mary Mounthaw was not one of those chosen; instead the parish was uni...
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APRIL
9
2018

 

Arnold Circus, E2
Arnold Circus lies to the north of Shoreditch. The Boundary Estate was the result of a major slum clearance of the 1890s. This area, called Friars Mount, was part of an area parcelled out in building leases in the early 19th and may have been named after a farmer called Fryer. It had become an area of speculative building and absentee landlords. Housing, originally cottages for weavers, had been crammed and infilled with badly built and ruinous dwellings with little drainage or water supply and grossly overcrowded inhabited by those barely able to make a living. One in every four children born here died in childhood. Its poverty and desperation drew philanthropists from the late 18th and reformers attempted to improve health and housing. The London County Council was instrumental in bringing about a change more than any other. The Boundary Estate is a milestone. The 1890 Housing of the Working Classes Act enabled the London County Council to develop a comprehensive plan of clearance and redevelopment for rehousing of 5,300 ...
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APRIL
8
2018

 

Marlow Workshops, E2
Marlow Workshops is a Victorian block containing a mixture of residential and commercial use. They consist of a terrace of Grade II listed industrial workshops and were built in 1899

The residential part of the block is accessed via a private forecourt.
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APRIL
7
2018

 

York Way, WD6
York Way is the remnant of a service road which used to serve the MGM studios. with the demise of the MGM Borehamwood studios in the early 1970s, the studio was vacant for a while before Christian Salveson - a Scottish logistics company - moved there. Salveson demolished the backlot and built storage facilities. However they retained the distinctive MGM tower and added their logo.

When Salveson in turn moved out, the chance was taken to develop an industrial estate. This meant the demolition of the last MGM buildings.
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APRIL
6
2018

 

Haydon Street, EC3N
Haydon Street heads east from the Minories. The earliest mention of Haydon Street seems to be on Greenwood’s map, 1827. Earlier forms of the streetname were "Heydons Yard" (1677). "Heydon Yard" (Rocque, 1746). "Haydon Yard" (Horwood, 1799).

The name is derived from the family of Heydon, who were well known in the district. Captain John Heydon occupied the Minories officially as Master of the Ordnance 1627-1642, and took a great interest in the precinct.
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APRIL
5
2018

 

Haydon Street, E1
The eastern end of Haydon Street was called Mansell Passage. It was known by this name as a railway cut off the greater part of Haydon Street to the west. When the railway disappeared the two parts of Haydon Street were combined.
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APRIL
4
2018

 

America Square, EC3N
America Square is a street and small square, built in about 1760 and dedicated to the American colonies. America Square was developed as part of Square, Crescent and Circus under plans by George Dance the Younger in 1768-1774. The Crescent was built at the expense of Sir Benjamin Hammet, who is commemorated by the name of another street in the area. He was a partner in the City bank of William Esdaile and was also alderman for the ward of Portsoken.

Nathan Meyer Rothschild lived at No. 14 in the 19th century. The square was bombed in 1941, and Rothschild’s house was demolished.

Today, America Square is occupied by offices, restaurants and a gymnasium.
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APRIL
3
2018

 

Middlesex Street, E1
Middlesex Street is home to the Petticoat Lane Market. In Tudor times, Middlesex Street was known as Hogs Lane, a pleasant lane lined by hedgerows and elms. It is thought city bakers were allowed to keep pigs in the lane, outside the city wall; or possibly that it was an ancient droving trail.

The lane’s rural nature changed, and by 1590, country cottages stood by the city walls. By 1608, it had become a commercial district where second-hand clothes and bric-à-brac were sold and exchanged, known as ’Peticote Lane’. This was also where the Spanish ambassador had his house, and the area attracted many Spaniards from the reign of James I. Peticote Lane was severely affected by the Great Plague of 1665; the rich fled, and London lost a fifth of its population.

Huguenots fleeing persecution arrived in the late 17th century; many settled in the area, and master weavers settled in the new town of Spitalfields. The area already had an association with clothing, with dyeing a local industry. The cl...
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APRIL
2
2018

 

Petticoat Lane Market
Petticoat Lane Market is a fashion and clothing market in the East End. It consists of two adjacent street markets. Wentworth Street Market is open six days a week and Middlesex Street Market is open on Sunday only.

It is one of a number of traditional markets located to the east of the City of London. A few hundred yards to the north is Old Spitalfields Market, which has been refurbished, and across Commercial Street, to the east, lies Brick Lane Market. A half mile further east is the Columbia Road Flower Market. Petticoat Lane Market was not formally recognised until an Act of Parliament in 1936, but its long history as an informal market makes it possibly one of the oldest surviving markets in Britain.

The name Petticoat Lane came from not only the sale of petticoats but from the fable that "they would steal your petticoat at one end of the market and sell it back to you at the other."

In Tudor times, Middlesex Street was known as Hogs Lane, a pleasant lane lined by hedgerows and elms. It is thought city ba...
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APRIL
1
2018

 

Holy Trinity, Minories
Holy Trinity, Minories was a Church of England parish church outside the eastern boundaries of the City of London, but within the Liberties of the Tower of London. The parish covered an area previously occupied by the precincts of the Abbey of the Minoresses of St. Clare without Aldgate, founded by Edmund Crouchback, in 1293, for a group of Spanish nuns of the Order of St. Clare who arrived with his wife. The nuns were also known as the Minoresses – which came to be adapted as the name for the district, Minories. The nunnery was surrendered to the Crown in 1539, during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and the buildings, excluding the chapel, were used as an armory for the Tower of London, and later, as a workhouse. Some of the abbey buildings survived until their destruction by fire in 1797.

The liberty was incorporated in the Metropolitan Borough of Stepney in 1899, and today is within the City of London.

The nuns’ chapel became a parish church. Considerable changes were made to the building: all the ancient monuments were removed, a gallery, a new pulpit and pews were installed, and a steeple was built...
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