Florence Nightingale Museum

Museum in/near Lambeth, existing between 1989 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG  CONTACT 
52.55.186.225 
Can't see your street on the map? Click here to view a list of local streets
MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Museum · Lambeth · SE1 ·
JANUARY
4
2019
The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas’ Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames.



The museum tells the real story of Florence Nightingale, "the lady with the lamp", from her Victorian childhood to her experiences in the Crimean, through to her years as an ardent campaigner for health reform. Nightingale is recognised as the founder of modern nursing in the United Kingdom. The new museum explains her legacy and also celebrates nursing today: it is a member of The London Museums of Health & Medicine group.

In 1860, four years after her famous involvement in the Crimean War, Nightingale founded the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St. Thomas’ Hospital and the museum is located on this site.

Main source

The free encyclopedia

Citations and sources

Gillian Bebbington's 1972 work on street name derivations

Links and further reading

Facebook Page
Facebook Page
Facebook Page
Facebook Page

VIEW THE LAMBETH AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE LAMBETH AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE LAMBETH AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE LAMBETH AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE LAMBETH AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Lambeth

The ’Lamb’ in Lambeth really means just that.

The name is recorded in 1062 as Lambehitha, meaning ’landing place for lambs’, and in 1255 as Lambeth. The name refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ’lamb’ and ’hythe.

South Lambeth is recorded as Sutlamehethe in 1241 and North Lambeth is recorded in 1319 as North Lamhuth. The marshland in the area, known as Lambeth Marshe, was drained in the 18th century but is remembered in the Lower Marsh street name. Sometime after the opening of Waterloo railway station in 1848 the locality around the station and Lower Marsh became known as Waterloo.

Lambeth Palace is located opposite the Palace of Westminster. The two were linked by a horse ferry across the Thames.

Until the mid-18th Century the north of Lambeth was marshland, crossed by a number of roads raised against floods.

With the opening of Westminster Bridge in 1750, followed by the Blackfriars Bridge and Vauxhall Bridge, a number of major thoroughfares were developed through Lambeth, such as Westminster Bridge Road, Kennington Road and Camberwell New Road.

In William Blake’s epic Milton a Poem, the poet John Milton leaves Heaven and travels to Lambeth, in the form of a falling comet, and enters Blake’s foot. This allows Blake to treat the ordinary world as perceived by the five senses as a sandal formed of "precious stones and gold" that he can now wear. Blake ties the sandal and, guided by Los, walks with it into the City of Art, inspired by the spirit of poetic creativity. The poem was written between 1804 and 1810.
Print-friendly version of this page


View copyright notice