Bunhill Fields

Cemetery/graveyard in/near Barbican, existing between 1664 and now

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Cemetery/graveyard · Barbican · EC1Y ·
APRIL
4
2019
Bunhill Fields was in use as a burial ground from 1665 until 1854.


By the mid nineteenth century, about approximately 123,000 interments were estimated to have taken place of which over 2000 monuments remain.

It contains the graves of many notable people including John Bunyan, author of ’The Pilgrim’s Progress’; Susanna Wesley, known as the "Mother of Methodism"; Daniel Defoe, author of ’Robinson Crusoe’; William Blake (died 1827), artist, poet, and mystic; . It was a nondenominational burial ground, and was particularly favoured by nonconformists.

On the far side of Bunhill Row is a Quaker burial ground, also sometimes also known by the name Bunhill Fields and in use from 1661 to 1855. Its remains are a public garden, Quaker Gardens, managed by the London Borough of Islington.

Citations and sources

Gillian Bebbington's 1972 work on street name derivations
The free encyclopedia

Links and further reading

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VIEW THE BARBICAN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE BARBICAN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE BARBICAN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE BARBICAN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE BARBICAN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

100 Bishopsgate

100 Bishopsgate is a development of two mixed-use buildings on Bishopsgate in London.

A planning application was submitted by Great Portland Estates in September 2006 for the redevelopment of a site located at 61 St. Mary Axe, 80-86 Bishopsgate, 88-90 Bishopsgate, 12-20 Camomile Street, 15-16 St. Helen’s Place and 33-35 St. Mary Axe. The scheme proposed a mixed-used development comprising three buildings of 38, 16 and 6 storeys respectively.

The main tower (Building 1) would be formed of five podium floors, each of 44,000 sq ft (4,100 m2; 0.41 ha), and 32 tower floors, each of 19,000–25,000 sq ft (1,800–2,300 m2; 0.18–0.23 ha). The form of the lower part of the tower is designed to resolve the complex geometries of the site; thus the lower floors are shaped as parallelograms and the upper floors are shaped as rectangles.

The third building (Building 3) would be formed of six storeys of 8,000 square feet (740 m2) each, providing restaurant and office space.

A new public space of 0.5 acres (2,000 m2) is situated in the middle of the site.

The application was approved on 28 May 2008. In July 2011 the proposed height was increased by seven metres (23 ft) to 172 metres (564 ft).
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