Wormholt Farm

Farm in/near East Acton, existing until 1909

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MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302019Fullscreen map
Farm · East Acton · W12 ·
October
8
2019
Wormholt Farm existed until the First World War.

Wormholt Wood notice
The name ’Wormeholt’ is a term referring to snake-infested woodland in old English. The name was first used in 1189 after the woodland was cleared. The land became part of the Manor of Fulham and owned by the Bishops of London. The manor then descended to become Wormholt Barns.

For 200 years from 1548, Wormholt was leased to the Duke of Somerset. By the beginning of the seventeenth century, a family called Atley was running it but the poor quality of most of the land led to frequent changes of tenancy.

In the nineteenth century Wormholt Barns Manor was split between Eynham Farm and Wormholt Farm.

A survey of 1833 described the soil of Wormholt Farm as "strong loam, making good grazing fields near Uxbridge Road, but towards Wormholt Wood Scrubs it becomes too stiff and too wet in winter." These soil characteristics determined the eventual use of the land. The northern areas of the farm remained as arable and grazing almost to the end but the southern fields were suited to brickmaking - such land was valued at £4000 per acre.

In the early 1900s the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, who had come into possession of the farms, decided to sell parts of the Wormholt Farm and Old Oak Farm for development. Part of the land - built upon a field called Barn Field - became Wormholt Park, opened on 27 June 1911 by the Mayor of Hammersmith. The remainder of the land was already being built upon by 1903.

VIEW THE EAST ACTON AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE EAST ACTON AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE EAST ACTON AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE EAST ACTON AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE EAST ACTON AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

East Acton

East Acton is an area in west London.

Anciently, East Acton and Acton developed as separate settlements and the nearby districts of North Acton, West Acton and South Acton were developed in the late nineteenth century.

East Acton, largely separated from London by Wormwood Scrubs developed later and was mainly agricultural until after the arrival of the underground railway.

East Acton station opened in 1920 on the Ealing Broadway extension of the Central London Railway (CLR), which was renamed the Central line in 1937.

The new line was built with connections to the West London Line near Shepherd’s Bush, the former GWR main line to Birmingham at North Acton, and the main line to Bristol at Ealing Broadway.

Since the CLR was exclusively a passenger service, two extra dedicated tracks for the GWR’s freight trains were opened in 1938, but were closed in 1964. The trackbed of these rails is now overgrown, with vegetation visible immediately to the north of the station.

East Acton was mentioned frequently in the classic 1950s radio comedy series the Goon Show, as the Goons used to rehearse in a room over a greengrocers in East Acton.
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