South Kenton

South Kenton is an area of the London Borough of Harrow which is served by South Kenton station.

Kenton hamlet was recorded as "Keninton" in 1232. The name derives from the personal name of the Saxon "Coena" and the Old English "tun", a farm and means "the farm of Coena" and his family who once lived on a site near here.

Before the 20th century, the tiny settlement was concentrated around in what was Kenton Lane (the easternmost part of which remains as Old Kenton Lane to the east of Kingsbury station) and is now part of the present day Woodgrange Avenue and Kenton Road.

The Plough public house was Kenton’s first, opening in the early 18th century though the current building is not the original.

Kenton station was opened by the London and North Western Railway on 15 June 1912. The Metropolitan Railway’s Northwick Park and Kenton station (later renamed Northwick Park) followed on 28 June 1923.

The London County Council built the Kenmore Park cottage estate between the wars. There are 654 houses on the 23 hectare site.

Thomas Francis Nash owned building companies which from the 1920s onward built numerous private housing estates in Kenton, Ruislip and other parts of the "Metroland" area of Middlesex. F. & C. Costin was another local building company that built much of Kenton between the wars. Local estate agents still use the term "Nash-built" or "Costin-built" to describe properties built by them in Kenton.

South Kenton station opened on 3 July 1933 with access from both sides of the railway via a footbridge to the single island platform serving only the Euston-Watford DC line. The footbridge was later replaced by a pedestrian tunnel, cutting out a long climb for passengers entering the station. The station was built in a more modern "concrete and glass" style construction including a "streamlined" waiting room rather than the brick and woodwork LNWR stations elsewhere on the DC line.

The ticket office is at platform level and occupies the north end of the streamlined 1933 building. It is one of the very few stations served by London Underground which has no ticket gates and due to the restrictive layout here.

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