Angell Town


Angell Town is a large, municipally-built housing complex on the Brixton/Stockwell border.

Angell Town takes its name from the eccentric landowner John Angell, who died in 1784. His grandfather, Justinian, had acquired the property by marriage. Brixton remained undeveloped until the beginning of the 19th century.

Angell Town was laid out in the 1850s on the east side of Brixton Road. The church of St John the Evangelist was built in 18523, designed by Benjamin Ferrey in the Perpendicular style.

Most of the old town was replaced in the 1970s by a council estate that combined 1960s-style blocks with the newer concept of overhead walkways and linking bridges, some of which were later removed in an attempt to prevent robbers and vandals making easy getaways. A bridge was supposed to cross Brixton Road to the social facilities on the Stockwell Park estate, but it was never built.

Angell Town soon gained a reputation for neglect and decline and became stigmatised as a sink estate. In a scheme notable for the high degree of residents’ participation, the estate was radically redeveloped from the mid-1990s onwards.

Urban designers, planners, and architects looked at opportunities to build on the strong community that had lived there for decades. The project improvements committed a large investment to renovate the buildings they could, and design the new ones to compliment the existing ones.

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