Monthly Archive: June 2017

Jun 17

Trivia for every Underground station

Acton Town Alphabetically, Acton Town is the first tube station on the network. The first electric train on the District Line ran eastbound starting from Acton Town on 28 March 1905 Aldgate Is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are buried. Aldgate East While engineers worked on lowering …

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Jun 16

Contrasting Camden Town and Regent’s Park

Cumberland Basin attracted many factories over the years. A vinegar works, piano factories, gramophone record makers —-. The list goes on and on. Many servants who worked in the large houses in Regent’s Park, lived in the small, terraced houses round the basin. These were among the houses which were to become so overcrowded when …

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Jun 15

Park Village East, NW1

In 1995, two fine houses from the beginning of the nineteenth century were carefully restored. They are in Park Village East and can be seen from the Gloucester Road Bridge, at the top of Parkway. The first two houses in the road, they were built in the 1830s but, owing to the unusual pattern of …

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Jun 14

Abingdon Road, W8

Abingdon Road stretches between Stratford Road and Kensington High Street. It was built upon land from the Nokes Estate – a farm which used to be in the area. The houses are mainly on three-storeys with basements, some entirely stuccoed and some stuccoed only up to first floor level. The street is tree-lined and very attractive. …

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Jun 13

Nokes Estate, Kensington

Essentially, it included part of Earls Court Lane (now Earls Court Road) and Barrow’s Walk (now Marloes Road) and contained an orchard and several fields on which Abingdon Villas, Scarsdale Villas and neighbouring roads were later built . In 1593 it was owned by Robert Fenn and remained in that family until Sir Robert Fenn …

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Jun 12

Edwardes Estate, Kensington

In 1599 Sir Walter Cope, an influential courtier, bought Abbots Kensington manor from Queen Elizabeth I. He was collecting North Kensington manors. In 1591 he had bought West Town and in 1599 he also bought Notting Barnes, which later became Notting Hill. Cope’s daughter, Isabel, married Sir Henry Rich, the First Earl of Holland. The …

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Jun 11

Inderwick Estate, Kensington

In 1836 John Inderwick, of Wardour Street in Soho, an importer of snuff boxes, bought six and a half acres of land in Kensington on which now stand Nos. 1-13 Canning Place, Victoria Grove, Albert Mews and the north part of Launceston Place. The layout on his little estate was probably created by an architect …

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Jun 10

Adam and Eve Mews, W8

Adam and Eve Mews is a cobbled mews entered under a covered entrance on the south side of Kensington High Street. Some houses have been painted in bright colours, whereas others are faced in plain brick. The mews forks south and west at the end; at the western section again forks north leading to a very …

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Jun 09

Phillimore Estate, Kensington

Campden House In the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, a large country house with spacious grounds, later stood in this area. Sir Walter Cope had lived in it. About 1609 Sir Baptist Hicks bought the house and the estate. In 1628 Hicks was made Viscount Campden (a name he took from a manor he owned …

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Jun 08

Pitt Estate, Kensington

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, a large country house with spacious grounds, bearing the name ‘Campden House’ stood in this area. Sir Walter Cope had lived in it. About 1609 Sir Baptist Hicks bought the house and the estate. In 1628 he was made Viscount Campden (a name he took from a manor …

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