Category Archive: Kensington

Sep 01

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: During the Eighteen Thirties

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER FOUR DURING THE EIGHTEEN THIRTIES The first encroachment on the rural character of Notting Hill was the cutting of the Paddington Branch of the Grand Junction Canal. Several artificial waterways had already been constructed among the manufacturing towns in the north of England, and the canal …

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Aug 31

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: In the Eighteenth Century

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER THREE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY The commencement of the village of Kensington Gravel Pits has already been described. Under present conditions it is difficult to realize how countrified the place remained during the whole of the eighteenth century. In Kip’s Britannia Illustrata, published in 1714, there …

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Aug 30

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Kensington Gravel Pits and Northlands

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER TWO KENSINGTON GRAVEL PITS AND NORTHLANDS During the period of disorder which followed the Roman occupation of Britain, the forests were allowed to encroach, and in many places stretches of road became decayed and were ultimately overgrown by trees. This evidently happened between Brentford and Shepherd’s …

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Aug 29

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Chenesitun and Knotting Barns

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER ONE CHENESITUN AND KNOTTING BARNS On the north side of the Thames as it crosses London there is a range of low hills. Beginning with Tower Hill close to the river, the range ends with Campden Hill, three-quarters of a mile from its bank. Each hill …

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Aug 20

Notting Hill in Bygone Days

We have scanned the seminal 1920s book about W10 and W11 history (now out of print): Florence Gladstone’s “Notting Hill in Bygone Days”. Each chapter is available here by following the links.   Chapter 1 Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Chenesitun and Knotting Barns Chapter 2 Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Kensington Gravel Pits and …

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Jun 13

The De Veres – Lords of the Manor of Kensington

‘Here come de Veres of the times of old…’ Edward Walford ‘Old London’ The first recorded mention of Kensington in ‘The Doomesday Book’ is: ‘Albericus de Ver holds of the Bishop of Coutances Chenesitun.’ After the Norman Conquest, the manor of Chenesitun passed from Edwin the Thegn of Edward the Confessor to Geoffrey, Bishop of …

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