Category Archive: Notting Dale

Mar 06

The Potteries and the Bramley Road area

N.B. Clicking on map markers take you to articles on the main website A NOTE ON LINKS Uxbridge Road – lower case links resolve to the main website, rather than this blog RACKHAM STREET – upper case links go to other articles in this blog Between the Ladbroke and Norland estates there extended northward from …

Continue reading »

Nov 21

Walmer Road, W11

Walmer Road started as an established footpath called Greeneā€™s Lane and appears as such on the 1800 map of the area. It connected the Uxbridge Road (Holland Park Avenue) with one of the only buildings north of this turnpike road – Notting Barns Farm. The soil was ideal for brickmaking and brickfields moved into the …

Continue reading »

Sep 20

1800: London W10

This map of the 1800 countryside in the area which covers today’s London W10 postcode has been compiled by The Underground Map from various sources. As its main source, the Milne map of London shows the landuse of fields and the routes of lanes. An 1834 map of Marylebone Parish provided field names up to …

Continue reading »

Sep 04

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Notting Dale

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER SEVEN NOTTING DALE Before describing the streets to the east of the Hippodrome Estate, connecting Notting Hill with Bayswater and Paddington, it will be best to consider the growth of the district which has had such a disastrous effect on the development of the western borders …

Continue reading »

Sep 02

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: The Peaceful Hamlet of Notting Hill

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER FIVE THE PEACEFUL HAMLET OF NOTTING HILL AT the beginning of the nineteenth century, the village of Kensington Gravel Pits extended for three-eighths of a mile along the North Highway. The name seems to have been used for scattered buildings as far east as Craven Terrace …

Continue reading »

Sep 01

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: During the Eighteen Thirties

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER FOUR DURING THE EIGHTEEN THIRTIES The first encroachment on the rural character of Notting Hill was the cutting of the Paddington Branch of the Grand Junction Canal. Several artificial waterways had already been constructed among the manufacturing towns in the north of England, and the canal …

Continue reading »

Aug 31

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: In the Eighteenth Century

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER THREE IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY The commencement of the village of Kensington Gravel Pits has already been described. Under present conditions it is difficult to realize how countrified the place remained during the whole of the eighteenth century. In Kip’s Britannia Illustrata, published in 1714, there …

Continue reading »

Aug 29

Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Chenesitun and Knotting Barns

Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone CHAPTER ONE CHENESITUN AND KNOTTING BARNS On the north side of the Thames as it crosses London there is a range of low hills. Beginning with Tower Hill close to the river, the range ends with Campden Hill, three-quarters of a mile from its bank. Each hill …

Continue reading »

Aug 23

Daw’s map of Kensington (1852)

From Daw’s map of Kensington, published in 1852, shows the streets of Notting Dale (left) and Notting Hill (right) are beginning to be built.

Aug 20

Notting Hill in Bygone Days

We have scanned the seminal 1920s book about W10 and W11 history (now out of print): Florence Gladstone’s “Notting Hill in Bygone Days”. Each chapter is available here by following the links.   Chapter 1 Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Chenesitun and Knotting Barns Chapter 2 Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Kensington Gravel Pits and …

Continue reading »

Older posts «