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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
October
1
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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JULY
26
2022

 

Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...
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JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


MAY
17
2022

 

Nelson’s Column
Nelson’s Column is a monument in Trafalgar Square built to commemorate Horatio Nelson’s decisive victory at the Battle of Trafalgar during which he lost his life In February 1838, a group of 121 peers, Members of Parliament and others formed a committee to raise a monument to Lord Nelson, funded by public subscription. The Government agreed to provide a site in Trafalgar Square, in front of the newly completed National Gallery.

The winning entry, chosen by a sub-committee headed by the Duke of Wellington was a design by William Railton

The monument was constructed between 1840 and 1843 to a design by Railton at a cost of £47 000. The column was built from Dartmoor granite and the statue of Nelson was carved from Craigleith sandstone by sculptor Edward Hodges Baily.

The four bronze lions around its base, designed by Sir Edwin Landseer, were added in 1867.

The whole monument is 169 feet 3 inches tall from the bottom of the pedestal to the top of Nelson’s hat. It was refurbished in 2006 at which time it was surveyed and found to be 14 feet 6 inches shorter than previously supposed.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 505 completed street histories and 46995 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

NOVEMBER
26
2015

 

Lansdowne Road, W11
Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill. Lansdowne Road was built in the 1840s and were named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham, where the developers, Pearson Thompson and Richard Roy, had been active. Lansdowne Walk was known first as Queen’s Terrace and then as Hanover Terrace; and Lansdowne Rise was until 1937 known as Montpelier Road (Montpelier was a popular street name after the Napoleonic wars, as the French sent captured British officers there on parole, and many British prisoners-of war returned with fond memories of the place; Montpellier was also the name of another district of Cheltenham developed by Pearson Thompson).

Lansdowne Road had three separately named terraces: Lansdowne Villas (numbers 2-12 evens); Lansdowne Terrace; and Moreton Villas. They were subsumed into Lansdowne Road in 1863.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
24
2015

 

Westbourne Grove, W11
Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill. Westbourne Grove runs from Kensington Park Road in the west to Queensway in the east, crossing over Portobello Road. It contains a mixture of independent and chain retailers.

The development of Westbourne Grove began in the 1840s and proceeded from the east (which lay in Bayswater) to the west, where it became the principal east-west artery into the Ladbroke Estate. The far western end of the street only became known as Westbourne Grove relatively recently in 1938, having previously been called Archer Street. The rest of the road was under the moniker Westbourne Grove West for a while. In 1929, the novelist A.J. Cronin opened his own’ medical practice at 152 Westbourne Grove - this was put up for sale in 2007.

Westbourne Grove takes its name from Westbourne Green - a settlement that developed to the west of the bourne that later took the name River Westbourne.

There was a small settlement to the north of what is now Westbourne Grove at We...
»more


NOVEMBER
23
2015

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road. The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
»more


NOVEMBER
18
2015

 

Rosmead Road, W11
Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road. Chichester Road was renamed after the 1st Baron Rosmead, a distinguished British colonial administrator (chiefly in the Far East and South Africa), who died in 1898.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
16
2015

 

The Victoria (Narrow Boat)
The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down. The ’Vic’ was the first building on the right when crossing the canal going north along Ladbroke Grove.

Its start date as a hostelry is unknown - the name (both "Victoria Arms" and "Queen Victoria") suggests that it was of 19th century origin though it is not marked as a pub on the 1900 map.

The Victoria was a very small establishment. It stood just next to a ’dingy’ staircase and alleyway which formed a short cut between Ladbroke Grove and what was Church Place – handy for the bus stop for the number 18 bus along the Harrow Road. The toilet for the pub was down a stretch of notorious steep steps. Also down the stairs was a small beer garden.

Church Place is now called St John’s Terrace and the right of way is still there.

In later years it became called “The Narrow Boat” and was a Fullers pub. As The Narrow Boat, the landlords were a husband and wife: Wally and Renee. Wally was a taxi driv...
»more


NOVEMBER
15
2015

 

Duke of Cornwall
The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant. The Duke Of Cornwall was situated at 127 Ledbury Road. This former Courage pub adopted the name of the Ledbury Arms following the closure of a pub of the same name at 40 Ledbury Road and closed c. 2005.

The Ledbury restaurant opened on the site in 2005, under head chef Brett Graham. As such, it has been featured in S.Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants. It is the sister restaurant of The Square, a two Michelin star restaurant in Mayfair, with the same backers investing in both restaurants.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
8
2015

 

The Foresters
The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10 One local remembers living in Octavia House as a child which was opposite the pub on Southern Row.

"Bookmakers used to stand outside taking people’s bets" she said. "I remember the horse from the yard behind West Row being taken into the pub one day as a laugh and they messed all over the floor ,the landlord didn’t think it was funny!"
»read full article


NOVEMBER
7
2015

 

Lads of the Village
One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road. The Lads of the Village, later "The Lads" and more recently "Frames" found itself situated on the corner of Middle Row and Kensal Road.

The pub was frequented by the father of Labour politician Alan Johnson who ran off with the barmaid.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
6
2015

 

Clayton Arms
A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town. The Clayton Arms was situated at 9 West Row and was sometimes known by its alternative title: The Little House.

There was a yard at the back called Clayton Yard.

It first appears on documents dating from 1849 and appears to have finished business in the 1950s.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
5
2015

 

Queen’s Park Library
Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents. The Artizans’, Labourers’, and General Dwellings Co. built the Queen’s Park Estate from the 1875 onwards on temperance principals. While the Estate was well-provisioned in most amenities, there were no public houses.

Instead, the minds of the new residents were to be improved and space was reserved on the corner of Harrow Road and Fourth Avenue for a public library.

This was built by the local council.
»read full article


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