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MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Mile End ·
October
15
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Bonner Street, E2
Bonner Street was named for Edmund Bonner, Bishop of London from 1539–49 and again from 1553-59. Bonner Street was once split into Bonner Street as its southernmost part and Bonner Lane in the north.

The area east of Bethnal Green was rural but Bishop’s Hall existed, occupied by Bishop Bonner. In 1655, the local manor house was demolished and the material used to build four new houses in the area. By 1741, the four houses were described as joining the main building on the west. The most easterly house, next to the lane, was a public house - probably the Three Golden Lions.

Other houses were built in Bonner Street by 1800 and spread eastward during the next decade.



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SEPTEMBER
12
2021

 

Green Lanes, N21
Green Lanes is part of an old route that led from Shoreditch to Hertford Green Lanes may have been in use from the second century during Roman times - its name derives from its connecting a series of greens en route, many of which no longer exist as greens.

In the mid 19th century the southernmost part was renamed Southgate Road - until that occurred, the Green Lanes name referred to a much longer thoroughfare. It possibly originated as a drovers’ road along which cattle were walked from Hertfordshire to London.


Green Lanes ultimately runs north from Newington Green, forming the boundary between Hackney and Islington, until it reaches Manor House. As it crosses the New River over Green Lanes Bridge, it enters the London Borough of Haringey. From the junction with Turnpike Lane the road temporarily changes its name and runs through Wood Green as ’High Road’, resuming its Green Lanes identity again after the junction with Lascott’s Road. It then continues north through Palmers Green and Win...
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SEPTEMBER
11
2021

 

Pinner Park Farm
One of the last of the major Middlesex farms Pinner Park Farm is a 93 hectare site surrounded by suburban residential areas. It is owned by the London Borough of Harrow and leased to Hall & Sons (Dairy Farmers) Ltd, which formerly ran it as a dairy farm. It is designated as a Site of Nature Conservation Importance.

Pinner Park has existed since the 13th century, when it was part of a large area around Harrow placed under the control of the Archbishop of Canterbury. The woodland was then used as pannage for pigs, but by the 15th century most of the trees had been cut down for timber and charcoal and the cleared areas were used mainly for pasture. Part of the park was also stocked with roe deer, protected from the depredation of local people by a high bank (parts of which still exist) and two ditches. The park held about 100 deer by the end of the 15th centre.

From the middle of the 15th century, the park was leased by the archbishopric to local farmers. In the 16th century, when the lordship and owne...
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SEPTEMBER
10
2021

 

Winchmore Hill
Winchmore Hill is a district in the London Borough of Enfield bounded on the east by Green Lanes (the A105) and on the west by Grovelands Park Once a small village hamlet in the parish of Edmonton, Winchmore Hill borders Palmers Green, Southgate, Edmonton, Enfield Chase and Bush Hill Park. At the heart is Winchmore Hill Green, a village green surrounded by shops and restaurants. The nearest Underground station is at Southgate which is on the Piccadilly Line.

Of particular note in Winchmore Hill is Grovelands Park which originated as a private estate before being partly being sold to the council in 1913. What remained in private hands, is the famous Priory Clinic.

Prior to occupation by the Romans, the area was occupied by the Catuvellauni tribe. It is believed that this tribe built an ancient hill fort on the mound where the Bush Hill Park Golf clubhouse now stands.

The earliest recorded mention of Winchmore Hill is in a deed dated 1319 in which it is spelt Wynsemerhull. By 1565 the village was known as Wynsmorehyll, becoming Winchmore Hill by the time it was ment...
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SEPTEMBER
9
2021

 

St Giles
St Giles is a district of central London, at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden There has been a church at St Giles since Saxon times, located beside a major highway. The hospital of St Giles, recorded c. 1120 as Hospitali Sancti Egidii extra Londonium was founded, together with a monastery and a chapel, by Queen Matilda, wife of Henry I. St Giles (c. 650 – c. 710) was the patron saint of lepers and the hospital was home to a leper colony, the site chosen for its surrounding fields and marshes separating contagion from nearby London.

A village grew up to cater to the brethren and patients. The crossroads which is now St Giles Circus, where Oxford Street, Charing Cross Road, Tottenham Court Road and New Oxford St meet, was the site of a gallows until the fifteenth century. Grape Street, in the heart of the St Giles district, runs beside the site of the hospital’s vineyard.

The monastery was dissolved during the Reformation and a parish church created from the chapel. The hospital continued to care for lepers until the ...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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Comment
Simon Chalton   
Added: 10 Oct 2021 21:52 GMT   

Duppas Hill Terrace 1963- 74
I’m 62 yrs old now but between the years 1963 and 1975 I lived at number 23 Duppas Hill Terrace. I had an absolutely idyllic childhood there and it broke my heart when the council ordered us out of our home to build the Ellis Davd flats there.The very large house overlooked the fire station and we used to watch them practice putting out fires in the blue tower which I believe is still there.
I’m asking for your help because I cannot find anything on the internet or anywhere else (pictures, history of the house, who lived there) and I have been searching for many, many years now.
Have you any idea where I might find any specific details or photos of Duppas Hill Terrace, number 23 and down the hill to where the subway was built. To this day it saddens me to know they knocked down this house, my extended family lived at the next house down which I think was number 25 and my best school friend John Childs the next and last house down at number 27.
I miss those years so terribly and to coin a quote it seems they just disappeared like "tears in rain".
Please, if you know of anywhere that might be able to help me in any way possible, would you be kind enough to get back to me. I would be eternally grateful.
With the greatest of hope and thanks,
Simon Harlow-Chalton.


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Comment
Linda Webb   
Added: 27 Sep 2021 05:51 GMT   

Hungerford Stairs
In 1794 my ancestor, George Webb, Clay Pipe Maker, lived in Hungerford Stairs, Strand. Source: Wakefields Merchant & Tradesmens General Directory London Westminster 1794

Source: Hungerford Stairs

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

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Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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JANUARY
28
2016

 

St John’s, Notting Hill
St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill. St John’s was designed by the architects John Hargrave Stevens (1805/6–1857) and George Alexander (1810–1885), and built in the Victorian Gothic style. Dedicated to St John the Evangelist, the church was originally built as the centrepiece of the Ladbroke Estate, a mid nineteenth century housing development designed to attract upper and upper middle class residents to what was then a largely rural neighbourhood in the western suburbs of London.

In 1821 James Weller Ladbroke (died 1847) and his architect Thomas Allason (1790–1852) began to plan an estate on land which now spans the southern end of Ladbroke Grove. From 1837 to 1841 a significant part of this land was used as the Hippodrome race-course. The hill that is now surmounted by St John’s was used by spectators as a natural grandstand to view the races. The Hippodrome was not however a financial success, and by 1843 it had closed, the circular racecourse soon to be replaced by crescents of stuccoed house...
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JANUARY
27
2016

 

Sedgemere Avenue, N2
Sedgemere Avenue is named after Sedgemere House which stood on the site. Sedgemere House was situated opposite Park Farm and had dog kennels and a cattery.

It was sold to developers in 1901 and was pulled down to make way for Sedgemere Avenue, a development of ’maisonettes for rent to gentlefolk’.
»read full article


JANUARY
26
2016

 

Kingdon Road, NW6
Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road. Kingdon Road was possibly named after a speculator Emmeline Kingdon, and houses there date between 1883 and 1888.

Three blocks of flats, named Dene Mansions after Little Dene, home of the Ripley family, replaced Lauriston Lodge in 1904 which had been situated on what became the corner of Kingdon Road and Dennington Park Road.
»read full article


JANUARY
23
2016

 

Bangor Street, W11
Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court. Originally called George Street, it was the most notorious road of the Notting Dale ‘Special Area’ slum.

It was more colloquially known as ‘Do as you like Street’, a place where ‘no one left their door closed’, and the venue of the Rag Fair. At the turn of the 20th century, the local district nurses were reported "valiantly holding their own in spite of the disturbance caused by nightly brawls and the noisy and unsavoury Sunday markets."

Valerie Wilson recalled in an interview by the Notting Dale Urban Studies group: “They used to threaten us – don’t go up rag fair and the first thing we did when we got outside, we forgot all about it and went straight through rag fair… that was really like a film show, they used to hang old bits of clothing on the railings… the street would throng with people… there was a group of men who came out the war and they were all ex-servicemen, big tall strong men, and they couldn’t get work, so they f...
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JANUARY
21
2016

 

The Eagle
The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road. The pub features a brooding Eagle sat on the top of the corner. There are also a couple of Truman’s Beers lanterns still present and an iron Truman’s sign-holder jutting out from the wall.

There are a number of quirky touches, such as the stately oil paintings denoting the ladies and gents toilets, the elegant black railings that prop up the heavy-set wooden bar, and an Olympic-sized canoe suspended from the ceiling.

It is now the last remaining pub on Ladbroke Grove between the Harrow Road and the Westway.
»read full article


JANUARY
20
2016

 

Weston’s Cider House
In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road. It was closed in 1970 and demolished as part of a road improvement scheme.
»read full article


JANUARY
19
2016

 

The Mitre
The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road. The pub closed c.1972 after it burnt down.

After The Mitre was demolished, it eventually became home to Cafe O’Porto, one of Golborne’s favourite coffee shops.
»read full article


JANUARY
18
2016

 

Woodfield Crescent, W9
Woodfield Crescent was a former street in London W9. Most likely built in the 1880s, the road ceased to exist in the 1960s once the area was redeveloped.
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JANUARY
17
2016

 

North Kensington Library
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries. It was built as part of the free library movement.
»read full article


JANUARY
16
2016

 

Tavistock Mews, W11
Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road. Tavistock Mews is a short mews off Hayden’s Place, running behind Nos. 237-247 (odds) Portobello Road. Originally, the entrance to it was through an archway between Nos. 239 and 241 Portobello Road and there was no way through from Hayden’s Place. No trace of that entrance remains and Tavistock Mews is now effectively a branch of Hayden’s Place. The eastern side is lined with storage units and the other side gives access to the rears of the Portobello houses.

The mews was built in the 1860s and there is a full set of early deeds for the original Nos. 1-3 Tavistock Mews in the Local Studies section of Kensington Central Library. The buildings are described in the deeds as “coach-houses and tenements” – i.e. the coach-house would have been on the ground floor with accommodation above. In the 1920s, it was the Home of the Tavistock Mews Lads’ Club and Institute.

In 1933 the Mews was clearly in a very dilapidated state and it was declared a cl...
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JANUARY
15
2016

 

Stanley Gardens Mews, W11
Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s. Almost all that remains of the old Stanley Gardens Mews is the entrance through an arch on the left side of St Peter’s church in Kensington Park Road, together with a stretch of the old cobbles under the arch. There is also some attractive ironwork decoration under the arch.

It was a standard mews, both sides lined with small units, stables with accommodation above, running behind the Victorian terrace at Nos. 92-110 Kensington Park Road. There were 15 units in all. They were probably built in 1861 at the same time as the houses in this bit of Kensington Park Road, as the mews appears on the 1863 Ordnance Survey map.

By the end of the Second World War, the Mews was in a pretty dilapidated state. Nos. 11 and 12, the two houses immediately behind the 20th Century Theatre (formerly the Victoria Hall) belonged to the theatre and had been used as dressing rooms and to store stage scenery. But according to planning documents, by 1954 they were dilapidated an...
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JANUARY
12
2016

 

Fourth Avenue, EN1
Plans for four houses in Fourth Avenue were first submitted in 1880. In 1974 Enfield council compulsorily purchased properties north of Main Avenue and demolished Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Avenues to put up a housing estate.

Extensive Roman remains were discovered in the process and the new cul-de-sacs that took their places were given Roman-related names.
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JANUARY
11
2016

 

Ladbroke Terrace, W11
Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate. Building started in the 1820s at the Holland Park Avenue end, on the eastern side with four villas between the Avenue and what was to become Ladbroke Road. Others followed within ten years.

The normal development pattern seems to have been followed with James Weller Ladbroke first giving building leases, and then once the houses were constructed giving 99-year leases of the buildings at a relatively low ground rent to the developer, who could then sell the leaseholds or sublet the houses to recoup his outlay.
»read full article


JANUARY
10
2016

 

Winchester Hotel
Winchester Hotel was situated at 21a Winchester Road, NW3 It closed about 1970 to become home to the Winchester Project, a local youth centre.
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JANUARY
7
2016

 

Welbeck Mansions, NW6
Welbeck Mansions, flats notable for their ironwork balconies, were built north of Inglewood Road in 1897. They were built on the site of Potter’s foundry.
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JANUARY
6
2016

 

West Cottages, NW6
Cottages in London NW6. Industry came to West Hampstead, in the form of Thomas Potter’s foundry on the south-west side of West End Green, arrived in the 1860s, followed by Potter’s Buildings or West Cottages for its workers.
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JANUARY
5
2016

 

Inglewood Road, NW6
Inglewood Road, NW6 was one of the last roads to be built in West End, West Hampstead. On the west side of West End Lane, the land between the three railway lines was still largely untouched but beyond them building spread during the 1880s.

Thomas Potter, owner of Thorplands, 13 acres south of Mill Lane, stretching westward from the junction with West End Lane, where he lived in Poplar House, built about 15 houses fronting Mill Lane between 1873 and 1877 and the Elms and the Cedars next to the green by 1878.

New roads were constructed in the late 1870s and 346 houses were built between 1882 and 1894 in Sumatra, Solent, Holmdale, Glenbrook, Pandora, and Narcissus roads, mostly by J. I. Chapman of Solent Road, G. W. Cossens of Mill Lane, Jabez Reynolds of Holmdale Road, and James Gibb of Dennington Park Road.

Another 28 houses and a Methodist church were built on the estate fronting Mill Lane in 1886-7 and seven blocks of flats in West End Lane on what was called the Cedars estate in 1894.

Some 49 houses were ...
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JANUARY
4
2016

 

Inglewood House, NW6
Inglewood House is on the corner of West End Lane and Inglewood Road. Inglewood Road was built on the site of Poplar House in 1893.
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JANUARY
3
2016

 

Marlborough Mansions, NW6
Marlborough Mansions is a residential block in Fortune Green, NW6 E. J. Cave, one of the district’s most prominent Victorian builders, built the Cannon Hill estate where Marlborough, Buckingham and Avenue Mansions were built in the triangle formed by Cannon Hill, Finchley Road, and West End Lane in 1896-1900.

Conductor Sir Adrian Boult lived at at 78 Marlborough Mansions on Cannon Hill and has a blue plaque to his memory there. Nigel Balchin, the novelist, died in 1970 also in Marlborough Mansions.
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.