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Featured · Greenwich ·
MAY
8
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Greenwich
Greenwich is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames. Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was demolished to be replaced by the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained a military education establishment until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle es...

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APRIL
17
2021

 

West Smithfield, EC1A
West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area Smithfield and its market was founded in 1137. The ancient parish of St Sepulchre extended north to Turnmill Street, to St Paul’s Cathedral and Ludgate Hill in the south, and along the east bank of the Fleet (now the route of Farringdon Street). St Sepulchre’s Tower contains the twelve ’bells of Old Bailey’, referred to in the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". Traditionally, the Great Bell was rung to announce the execution of a prisoner at Newgate.

A livestock market was in the area as early as the 10th century.

As a large open space close to the City, Smithfield was a popular place for public gatherings. In 1374 Edward III held a seven-day tournament at Smithfield. Possibly the most famous medieval tournament at Smithfield was that commanded in 1390 by Richard II.

The Priory of St Bartholomew had long treated the sick. After the Reformation it was left with neither income nor monastic occupants but, following a petition by the C...
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APRIL
16
2021

 

Old Ford Road, E3
Old Ford Road stretches two and a quarter miles from Bethnal Green to Bow Old Ford Road represents two separate ways from different points to the sometime passage across the Lee, one being from the west, the other from the south, which in meeting converged with a third from the north which is known now as Wick Lane, the communication with Hackney.

In ancient times the estuary of the river Lee extended as far as Hackney Wick, and during the period when the Romans were in Britain the marshes which lay above it and on either side were crossed in the direction of Leyton by a stone causeway of which portions have been found, but of any contemporary road leading to it no traces have been discovered, although Roman remains were unearthed in 1868 in the coal and goods yard attached to Old Ford Station. The probability is that there was no military highway of massive construction such as those found elsewhere, but a track formed by use which led through woods and over the open fields to the first fordable place on the river Lee or Lea, a name derived ...
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APRIL
15
2021

 

Crossharbour
Crossharbour is a station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) Bank-Lewisham Line in Cubitt Town The station opened as ’Crossharbour’ on 31 August 1987 but was renamed in 1994 to ’Crossharbour and London Arena’. After the neighbouring London Arena was demolished in 2006, the original name was reinstated. Just to the north of the current station, the London and Blackwall Railway built Millwall Docks station. This operated between 1871 and 1926.

The ’cross harbour’ name refers to the nearby Glengall Bridge across Millwall Inner Dock. The bridge’s construction was a neccessity for the developers to obtain planning approval for the dock when it was built in 1868.

In 1969 Tower Hamlets council completed the St John’s estate on the Cubitt Town side of the station. The project was begun 17 years earlier by Poplar Borough Council.
»read full article


APRIL
14
2021

 

Narrow Street, E14
Narrow Street is a road running parallel to the River Thames through the Limehouse area Many archaeologists believe that Narrow Street represents the line of the medieval river wall. This wall was built to reclaim riverside marshland and to protect it from the tides.

A combination of tides and currents made this point on the Thames a natural landfall for ships. The first wharf was complete in 1348. Lime kilns or oasts (’lymehostes’) used in the production of mortar and pottery were built here in the fourteenth century.

Houses were then built, on the wall itself at first, but then outwards onto the foreshore by a process of encroachment. Indeed, the eastern end of Narrow Street was previously known as Fore Street.

The area grew rapidly in Elizabethan times as a centre for world trade. The neighbourhood supplied ships with ropes and other necessities; pottery was also made here for the ships. Ship chandlers settled here building wooden houses and wharves in the cramped space between street and river.

By the t...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply

   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

Reply
Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

Reply

Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
FEBRUARY
29
2016

 

Sellon’s Farm
To the east of Harlesden, there were still several farms, Elmwood, Haycroft, Upper Roundwood, and Sellon’s until the late 1890s. Sellon’s Farm stood at the current location of the point where Springwell Avenue meets Park Parade.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
23
2016

 

High Road, N11
High Road was formerly Betstyle Road. Between 1867 and 1896 New Southgate underwent a growth spurt. The area between High Road and Station Road had been completely developed, and workmen’s housing was beginning to appear in the shadow of the gasworks. Late Victorian and Edwardian lower middle-class housing was under construction in Springfield Road, Palmers Road, and The Limes Avenue.

Betstyle Road, once a country lane leading to Wood Green, had become New Southgate’s High Road and boasted in excess of ninety shops. High Road is now merely an insignificant backstreet. Until a phase of redevelopment began in 1974, it was the main road from Betstyle Circus, the large roundabout, through to Bounds Green Road and the North Circular Road. Victorian shopping parades, virtually all of which have now gone, lined both sides of the road.

The Northern Star opened in the 1860s and last century boasted a skittles alley, which was removed when the pub was refurbished in 1898. The Sir John Lawrence, an...
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FEBRUARY
22
2016

 

Wilsham Street, W11
Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road. Charles Booth’s poverty map placed the Kensington Potteries among the "criminal and irreclaimable areas", largely on account of the overcrowded condition of its unsuitable and derelict houses.

Five short streets in the district became known as the "Special Area.": Bangor Street, Crescent Street and three roads that have been renamed. St. Clement’s, now called Sirdar Road, St. Katherine’s Road, now Wilsham Street, and William, now Kenley Street.

In 1899 an enquiry was undertaken at the instance of the London County Council, and it was found that nearly half the babies born in this area died before they were a year old.

In 1904 there was a public-house to every twenty-five dwellings in these streets, and about twenty-three common lodging-houses provided accommodation for over seven hundred persons, at a nightly charge of fourpence or sixpence.

Greater however than the evil of these licensed lodging-houses, was that of t...
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FEBRUARY
19
2016

 

An introduction to Hampstead by G.E. Mitton (1902)
This text originates from "The Fascination of Hampstead" by Geraldine Edith Mitton (published 1902) The name of this borough is clearly derived from "ham," or "hame," a home; and "steede," a place, and has consequently the same meaning as homestead. Park, in a note in his book on Hampstead, says that the "p" is a modern interpolation, scarcely found before the seventeenth century, and not in general use until the eighteenth.

Lysons says that the Manor of Hampstead was given in 986 a.d. by King Ethelred to the church at Westminster, and that this gift was confirmed by Edward the Confessor; but there is an earlier charter of King Edgar of uncertain date, probably between 963 and 978. It granted the land at Hamstede to one Mangoda, and the limits of the grant are thus stated: "From Sandgate along the road to Foxhanger; from the Hanger west to Watling Street north along the street to the Cucking Pool; from the Cucking Pool east to Sandgate."

Professor Hales, who thinks, whether genuine or not, this charter is certainly of value, interprets Sandgate as North...
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FEBRUARY
17
2016

 

Kilravock Street, W10
Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10 The Queens Park Estate is a composition of buildings, streets, trees and open spaces which as a group is an asset to the community. The Estate has a special character which distinguishes it from its
surroundings. It displays the historical associations with the Artizans, Labourers and General Dwellings Company and with the Garden City Movement. The composition of the terraces, the architectural design, construction, detailing of the buildings and layout of the streets, define collectively the Estate’s cohesive townscape.

Much of the Estate’s charm and interesting character derives from the architects’ use of gothic ornamental detail, multi-coloured brickwork, decorative stonework and double hung sash windows. Within the Estate, each property is an integral part of the design. Apart from some exceptions such as the turreted houses, there is little variety between individual houses in the street or between the streets themselves and so each property makes is ...
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FEBRUARY
15
2016

 

Huxley Street, W10
Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate. Before construction started in 1874, the Queen’s Park Estate was proving very popular - 1500 applications from prospective tenants had been received.

By 1881 there were five classes of property, the rents varying according to the size and number of rooms. Queen’s Park was a success The Queen’s Park Estate was sold to Paddington Council in 1964 and it is the only Estate of its type within Westminster.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
14
2016

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10. Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had
already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to
owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts
of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
»read full article


FEBRUARY
12
2016

 

29 Rackham Street, W10
29 Rackham Street lay about halfway along on the north side of the street. Frank Hatton, who lived at 29 Rackham Street remembers:

Our house, and its neighbours, were known as tenement houses, in that each floor of the four story house was occupied by different families. There was a front door to which each family had a key. There were no door bells in those days, but each front door had a ’knocker’, and if you wished to call on the family on the first floor, you would knock once, if it was for the second floor, you would knock twice, and three times for the third floor, and four for the fourth or top floor.. There were just two toilets to serve the whole house, and the families would take turns in keeping them clean. There was no bathroom at all, so each family would have a large moveable metal bath, and once a week this would be be filled with hot water, which was boiled up in the kettle (no running hot water in those days) and it took around 20 to 30 kettles to fill the bath, and then the whole family would take turns to use the same...
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FEBRUARY
11
2016

 

Exmoor Street, W10
Exmoor Street runs from Barlby Road to St Charles Square, W10 St Charles Hospital was built in Exmoor Street in 1879.

The hospital was built by the Board of Guardians of the Poor Law Union of St. Marylebone as an infirmary for the sick poor of that parish, no site being then available in St. Marylebone itself.

Until 1922 it was known as St. Marylebone Infirmary. In 1923 it was renamed St. Marylebone Hospital, and when it was taken over in 1930 by the London County Council under the Local Government Act of the previous year it was given its present name of St Charles Hospital.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
10
2016

 

Silvester Mews, W11
Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11. On the 1900s Charles Booth map, Silvester Mews was marked as extremely poor. By the tme that the 1950 Ordnance Survey was released, the Mews had been redeveloped and replaced by Silvester House.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
9
2016

 

Golden Mews, W11
Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11. It was redeveloped in the twenty first century and renamed "Golden Cross Mews", becoming a gated community.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
8
2016

 

Blackburn Road, NW6
Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane. It was first laid out by the builder it was named after in 1885, a Mr. Blackburn.

F. R. Napier, had opened a plating shop behind West Hampstead fire station in 1919, took the site for his Hampstead Plating Works, which was founded in 1940.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
6
2016

 

6 East Row, W10
6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area. The plot was later absorbed into the expansion of the Emslie Horniman Pleasance park.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
2
2016

 

Lavie Mews, W10
Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road. Lavie Mews was a tiny mews with bends in it, serving a warehouse.

It disappeared as part of the Wornington Estate redevelopments in the early 1970s.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Bangor Street (1911)
Bangor Street was a street in Notting Dale which disappeared after the Second World War. This photo of the people of Bangor Street was featured in the London City Mission magazine from 1911:.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Clissold Park
The effluent society Although the march of new housing was approaching North Kensington by the 1820s, there was a serious practical impediment to development. The upper classes no longer expected to throw their human and household waste out of the windows, or into local streams. Closed sewers were an essential requirement for a successful building enterprise, but they were expensive to create.

However, a piece of good fortune came along. In 1836 the Birmingham Bristol and Thames Junction Railway was set up to provide a railway line between Willesden and the Thames. Railways were the “internet bubble” of the age and started up and went bust in rapid succession. The proposed route ran just to the west of the Norland Estate and through the Holland Estate near Addison Road. This happened to be the route of Counter’s Creek, a stream which served as the local sewer and rubbish dump. The Commissioners of Sewers insisted the railway company had to divert the stream and build a covered sewer f...
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Bangor Street
2015 The St Agnes soup kitchen was situated on the corner this photo was taken from.

Date unknown.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Acklam Road protests
Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway Flats in the Acklam Road section of the Western Avenue Extension are decorated with banners put up by residents, protesting against the new road, on the day of the opening ceremony at Paddington Green.
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FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s)
Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway North Kensington was, for a while in the early 1970s, a centre for activist graffiti.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Fowell Street, W11
Fowell Street, W10 was redeveloped in the 1970s. James Fowell a builder from Gray’s Inn Road, moved to Ponders End with the profits from Fowell Street, which he built.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Corner of Caird Street and Lancefield Street (1910)
The corner of Caird Street with Lancefield Street.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
1
2016

 

Corner of Bangor and Sirdar Road
The location became the Dolphin Pub. This picture is captioned in the London City Mission magazine
»read full article


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