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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
JUNE
30
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line. High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.
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MARCH
7
2022

 

Trafalgar Avenue, SE15
This area of Peckham, close to the Old Kent Road, was developed from the 1840s onwards In the 1850s, north Peckham was developing as a handsome, middle-class suburb. Leading south from the Old Kent Road, Trafalgar Road (later Trafalgar Avenue) was laid out including an earlier bridge (the Trafalgar Bridge) over the Grand Surrey Canal. The canal was filled in during 1970.

On the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street, a pub was built: "The Victory".

After the Second World War and its war damage, much of the southern part of Trafalgar Avenue was demolished to make way for parkland.
»read full article


MARCH
6
2022

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
»read full article


MARCH
5
2022

 

Lord Hills Road, W2
Lord Hill’s Road was at first called Ranelagh Road By the middle of the eighteenth century, Westbourne House - a large house and also known as Westbourne Place - had been rebuilt as an elegant Georgian mansion by the architect Isaac Ware. Residents had included Sir William Yorke (a Venetian ambassador), architect Samuel Pepys Cockerell (a distant relative of diarist Samuel Pepys) and finally General Rowland Hill, 1st Viscount Hill.

The River Westbourne flowed in a southeasterly direction across Paddington and beside Westbourne House. In its last incarnation it was the Ranelagh sewer - some of its course was still open in 1871 along the later line of Kilburn Park Road and Shirland Road. This was then built over but further south, it had already disappeared beneath new roads known as Formosa Road, Ranelagh Road and Cleveland Square.

General Rowland Hill left Westbourne House in 1836 and following his departure, the mansion was demolished and replaced by Westbourne Park Villas. Hill was Commander-in-Chief of...
»more


MARCH
4
2022

 

Hanbury Street, E1
Hanbury Street is a long road running west-east from Commercial Street to Vallance Road The street-line of the western section dates from around 1649 when it was known as Lolesworth Lane or Lolesworth Street as it crossed Lolesworth Field.

It appears as Browne’s Lane on maps of 1677, named after Jeffrey Browne, a local landowner who also owned part of the Spital Field which later became the market. The north side had become built up by 1681. The street was later extended east of Brick Lane, though called Montague Street, Church Street and Wells Street.

Considerable rebuilding took place during the early 1700s, resulting in the typical Georgian houses that dominated much of the area (and still do in nearby streets). Following the progressive expansion of Truman’s Black Eagle Brewery, Browne’s Lane and its continuations eastward were renamed and renumbered as Hanbury Street in 1876, in honour of Samson Hanbury and possibly his brother Osgood, who became partners in the brewery business from 1780. A widely reproduced br...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply
Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

Reply
Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

Reply
Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

APRIL
30
2016

 

Paddington
The first underground railway station in the world ran from Paddington on 10 January 1863 as the terminus of the Metropolitan Railway’s route from Farringdon. The first Metropolitan station opened as Paddington (Bishop’s Road) but Paddington station, designed by the celebrated engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel had long been the London end of the Great Western Railway.

Paddington had been an important town west of London before it was engulfed by the metropolis. It was first a medieval parish, then a metropolitan borough and finally integrated with Westminster and Greater London in 1965. Also found in Paddington are St Mary’s Hospital (where penicillin was first discovered) and the former Paddington Green Police Station - once the most important high-security police station in the United Kingdom.

Alan Turing, the pioneer mathematician was born in Warrington Crescent.

Fictionally, Paddington Station has a display case showing Paddington Bear, a character of children’s fiction who, in the book, is first discovered at this station and hence named after it.

Paddington...
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APRIL
28
2016

 

Eastminster
Eastminster (The Abbey of St Mary de Graces) was a Cistercian abbey on Tower Hill and founded by Edward III in 1350. It was located just outside the Roman London Wall. New Abbey was its alternative name.

The abbey was dissolved in 1538, and the site has for centuries been occupied by the London part of the Royal Mint.
»read full article


APRIL
25
2016

 

The ’Royal Blue’ horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road
The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge's. The shops behind, including Boots the Chemist, Stewart & Wright's Cocoa Rooms and the Northumberland Hotel, are covered in advertisements.
»read full article


APRIL
23
2016

 

Bullbaiters Farm
Bullbaiters Farm near Boreham Wood was originally called Bullbeggar's Farm - Bullbeggar meaning 'hobgoblin' or 'scarecrow'. Above the central door was the Byng family crest - onwers of the farm, who were based in Wrotham Park, South Mimms.

In the 1861 census, the occupant of Bullbaiters Farm was 60 year old William King, who farmed 190 acres and employed 3 men and 2 boys. In addition to his family two farm labourers also lived in the farm. Thrift Farm, nearby, was occupied by a farm labourer according to the census - so it may have been used as a farm cottage. Quite often, especially involving what had been smaller tenanted farms, the fields would be combined into a larger farm and the 'redundant' farm house used as farm cottages.
»read full article


APRIL
21
2016

 

Finstock Road, W10
Finstock Road is a turning out of Oxford Gardens. Finstock is an Oxfordshire place name.
»read full article


APRIL
19
2016

 

Avenue Farm
Cowhouse Farm was linked to Hodford Farm in Golders Green for a long period. As Cricklewood suburbanised, the farm became surrounded by housing. Latterly Dickers Farm and finally Avenue Farm, it was closed in 1932.

Its access track finally became Farm Avenue.
»read full article


APRIL
17
2016

 

Lothrop Street (1907)
2015 Postcode of a street in the Queen’s Park Estate
»read full article


APRIL
10
2016

 

Barnet Gate Wood
This small woodland is public open space, owned and managed by Barnet Council. It is a remnant of the extensive Middlesex Forest which covered most of this area after the last Ice Age.

Barnet Gate Wood is a small ancient woodland, with a canopy of oak and hornbeam, and an understorey dominated by rhododendron. Some of the hornbeam are in strange shapes as they were originally trained as hedges and then allowed go wild.

The entrance is by a path from Hendon Wood Lane, near the junction with Barnet Road. There is also access from the Dollis Valley Greenwalk and London Loop, at wooden posts numbered 12 and 13, which are points on the Barnet Gate Wood Nature Trail.

Barnet Gate Wood is part of Moat Mount Open Space and Mote End Farm, a Site of Borough Importance for Nature Conservation, Borough Grade II.

»read full article


APRIL
7
2016

 

Highwood Hill, NW7
Highwood Hill links the Rising Sun pub with Totteridge. Highwood Hill marks the junction of two ridges, one stretching east to Totteridge and the other south-east through Holcombe Hill to Mill Hill and Bittacy Hill.

“It is no uncommon thing to see 100 loads of hay go up to London on market day and each of the teams bring back a load of dung for dressing the land”, writes John Middleton in his "View of the Agriculture of Middlesex" (1798).

Hay farming, he says, was mixed with sheep farming; pig farming too “purchased fat by the hog­butchers of London”.

Some got rich through hay farming and some built many large mansions along Totteridge Lane, Highwood Hill and The Ridgeway. The landlords of these properties were allowed to enclose fields all over the area and the common lands, where the poor could graze their pigs, cows and geese, became much smaller and fewer, impoverishing those dependent on such land.

Lavish parks were laid out around their mansions, and the resident...
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.