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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
FEBRUARY
2
2023

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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AUGUST
21
2022

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
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AUGUST
20
2022

 

Rainham Road, NW10
Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895 The United Land Company bought a 6 acre triangle of land between Harrow Road and the Hampstead Junction railway in 1879, and an adjoining 21 acres from All Souls College in 1882. The whole area was laid out as high-density terraced housing and shops as far east as College Road.

The college leased 13 acres south of the L&NWR railway line to Edward Vigers, who by 1888 had laid out roads and started building 134 small terraced houses.

Rainham Road was let on building leases in 1895 and 30 houses had been built there by 1898.
»read full article


AUGUST
19
2022

 

Eton Avenue, NW3
Eton Avenue runs parallel with Adelaide Road, two blocks north From 1873 onward, William Willett and his son worked together as the chief building team in the area. In the early 1880s, they accepted the challenge of the Eton College estate by constructing Eton Avenue and surrounding roads.

The Willetts then moved on to both Lyndhurst Gardens and Wedderburn Road.

The houses set a precedent for aesthetic architecture in the speculative market. Drawing inspiration from English Queen Anne designs of the late 17th century, they were built with red brick, steep pitched roofs and tall chimneys. Dormers, gables, ornamental glass and ornamentation were other features that set them apart. Every single house was distinct.
»read full article


AUGUST
18
2022

 

Maylands
Maylands was already in existence by 1420 and then called Mellonde Maylands was part of the manor of Dagenhams as early as the 13th century, although it was let out on lease. Two fields beside the Brentwood Road were called Little and Great Dellams and were known in the Middle Ages. Around 1610, Maylands was leased to John Wright of Wright’s Bridge.

In 1919 and at an annual rent of £262, the tenant was a Mr G. Gotheridge who had purchased the farm that same year.

In the 1930s, Mr Hillman ran a civil aerodrome on Maylands Farm and organised aeroplane flights for 5/- per ride. When the Second World War ended, London County Council (LCC) didn’t acquire the farm as it was located outside of their housing estate area.

By the turn of the twenty first century, the old farm buildings had become the headquarters of The Maylands Golf Club.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

Reply

   
Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


Reply
Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

Reply

BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

JUNE
26
2016

 

Woodhouse College
Woodhouse College is a further education establishment which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 19. After the First World War, the former residence of ornamental plasterer Thomas Collins (1735–1830) in the Woodhouse area of Finchley was reconstructed; the house became The Woodhouse School in 1923. A blue plaque commemorating Thomas Collins is on the wall outside the present college office. The school coat of arms with the motto ’Cheerfulness with Industry’ is still displayed above the stage in the college hall.

During the Second World War, the school continued to function while the basement was used by the ARP service. The names of the forty-seven former pupils who died during WWII are recorded in a hand-illuminated Roll of Honour which hangs at the foot of the main staircase near the front entrance to the college.

The Roll of Honour also records the names of the four houses of the old grammar school: Gordon, Livingstone, Nightingale and Scott.
»read full article


JUNE
20
2016

 

25 Park Lane
25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon. Sassoon’s Park Lane home was previously owned by his parents Edward Sassoon and Aline Caroline de Rothschild. It was by all accounts a great town house and a great venue for entertaining.

Built in 1895-6 by T. H.Smith and C. E. Sayer for Barney Barnato a South African the house was 13,000 square feet. Peter Stansky author describes the house as having had a four-story-high marble staircase, a conservatory, a winter garden and a ballroom.

Previously decorated by his mother Lady Sassoon after the First World War he undertook extensive changes filling the house with French Furniture, tapestries and his most important paintings. The ballroom was painted by Jose Maria Sert who also painted a room at Port Lympne Mansion.

In 1920 Peter Stanksky notes that Sassoon commissioned him to do the room, despite the distress the Port Lympne Mansion rooms had bought on. The work was entitled Caravans of the East which covered the walls with Greek temple...
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JUNE
19
2016

 

St Mary Matfelon
St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel. For more than 600 years a Christian church stood on the site of Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel High Street. St Mary Matfelon was the second-oldest church in Stepney, having been created as a chapel-of-ease for the local area in the 13th century. A new church was built on the site, largely paid for by Octavius Coope, in 1877.

On 26 August 1880, the new church was devastated by fire, leaving only its tower, vestry and church rooms intact. It was rebuilt, opening in 1882.

On 29 December 1940, a Nazi fire raid destroyed the church. It was left in disrepair until it was finally demolished in 1952. The site of the church became St Mary’s Gardens in 1966 and is now a public park called Altab Ali Park. An outline of the footprint of the church is all that remains of it.

The outside of the original church in the middle ages was whitewashed. Its bright white colour prompted locals to call it the ’white chapel’ which became the name of the area.
»read full article


JUNE
16
2016

 

Camden Road
Camden Road is one of the few railway stations in England in which there is a police station. The first Camden Road (North London Railway) station was opened in 1850 and was situated on the east side of what is now St. Pancras Way. It was renamed Camden Town (NLR) on 1 July 1870 but was closed on 5 December 1870 when it was replaced by the second station situated a short distance to the west.

The present Camden Road station is the second station of this name (the first, on the North London Railway lasted from 1850-1870) and is located at the corner of Royal College Street and Camden Road. Designed by Edwin Henry Horne and opened as "Camden Town" by the North London Railway on 5 December 1870, it was renamed "Camden Road" on 25 September 1950 to avoid confusion with the London Underground Northern line Camden Town which had opened in 1907. Thus, between 1907 and 1950, there were two stations called ’Camden Town’.

In addition to the frequent local passenger service, the station is a busy location for freight traffic due to its proximity to the j...
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JUNE
13
2016

 

Ark Burlington Danes Academy
Burlington Danes Academy is a Church of England non-selective, co-educational secondary school within the English academy programme, located on a 10-acre site. The school re-opened as an academy in September 2006, but traces its origins to two separate schools, Burlington School for girls founded in 1699 and St Clement Danes School, founded in 1862, both originally situated in Westminster.

St Clement Danes moved to Du Cane Road in 1928, while Burlington school for Girls took over a magnificent Art Deco building in 1937. Almost 40 years later, in 1976, the two schools merged to create Burlington Danes Church of England School.

The school accepts students between the ages of 3 and 18 and the total school capacity is 1620.
»read full article


JUNE
2
2016

 

St Martin Pomary
St Martin Pomeroy was a parish church in the Cheap ward of the City of London. The church stood on the east side of Ironmonger Lane in the Cheap ward of the City of London. John Stow suggested that the name "Pomary" indicated that apple trees had once grown near the church. The patronage of the church belonged to the prior and canons of St Bartholomew the Great, until the dissolution of the priory, when it passed to the Crown.

In 1627 much of the north wall had to be rebuilt, and two years later the whole church was "repaired and beautified" at the cost of the parishioners. The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt. Instead the parish was united with that of St Olave Jewry and the site of the church retained as a burial ground.

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