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MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Notting Dale ·
July
29
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Blechynden Street, W10
Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10 The stump that remains belies its story as one of the main streets of the area.

Blechynden Street crossed a 50-acre estate that a barrister, James Whitchurch, purchased for £10 an acre in the early 19th century. He left his home in Blechynden in Southampton and built himself a house in Lancaster Road, North Kensington, now situated at No. 133.

Streets were built on the estate in 1846, and the first were named Aldermaston, Silchester, Bramley and Pamber after four neighbouring villages near Basingstoke, which was where James Whitchurch’s daughter Florence Blechynden Whitchurch was living.

After dividing the land into plots, he leased them to builders such as John Calverley, a Notting Hill builder who named a street after himself.

Other developers involved were Joseph Job Martin, the landlord of The Lancaster Tavern in Walmer Road, as well as the developer of Martin Street. Stephen Hurst, a builder from Kentish Town, was r...

»more

JULY
13
2021

 

Eversholt Street, NW1
Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town The origins of Eversholt Street lay in the 1750s when the New Road (later Euston Road) was established to bypass the congestion of London. North of this road were fields, brick works and market gardens. There was an informal path heading south from what later became Camden Town roughly along the line of the later street.

At the end of the 17th century, the Lord Chancellor John Somers acquired the local freehold. The immediate area was, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, known as Fig Mead.

The course of Eversholt Street began in the 1810s as the area developed. It provided a new route from the New Road with Camden Town. The name Eversholt Street was originally given only to its very northern, Bedford Estate part above Cranleigh Street (which was itself formerly Johnson Street). The Eversholt name refers to a village in Bedfordshire, most of the land in the village being owned by the Dukes of Bedford.

Eversholt Street is now ...
»more


JULY
12
2021

 

Balcombe Street, NW1
Balcombe Street is possibly a corruption of Batcombe, Dorset, in line with other Dorset-related street names in the area Balcombe Street, Dorset Square and Gloucester Place all date from 1815-1820. Balcombe Street was at first known as Milton Street.

The streets formed part of the Portman Estate. Their layout shows a social hierarchy of square, thoroughfares and side streets mirrored by a hierarchy in the design of houses, from the grand four storey buildings in Dorset Square to the rather less grand terraces and smaller houses in Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place and the significantly smaller scale of the three and two storey ‘third rate’ houses in the side streets and mews.

There are some 180 grade II buildings including the whole of Dorset Square, most of Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place. The predominant materials are brick and stucco.

The London part of the Portman Estate in Marylebone covers 110 acres and covers 68 streets, 650 buildings and four garden squares. In 1948 the Estate, then valued at £10 million, was subject to death duties of ...
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JULY
11
2021

 

Oslo Court, NW8
Oslo Court was built between 1936 and 1938 by architect Robert Atkinson Oslo Court was built over the final remaining 30 workmen’s cottages in the St John’s Wood area. These were demolished in 1936, after which the gentrification of NW8 was more or less complete (Lisson Grove notwithstanding).

The block consists of seven floors containing 125 flats, 112 of which have a direct view over Regent’s Park.

This work of Robert Atkinson has been described as the style of ’restrained modernism’ by englishbuildings.blogspot.com. Crittall windows are used and there are small sculptural panels, with Nordic themes such as a reindeer and a long boat. Each flat was designed with a living room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and a small hall. Each also had a balcony, and a restaurant was provided on the ground floor for the use of tenants. The rents varied from £140 to £250 per annum, according to the outward aspect of the view.

Many blocks in the area had restaurants in days gone by but have, one by one, disappeared. ...
»more


JULY
10
2021

 

Waldegrave Road, TW11
Waldegrave Road is named after Frances Waldegrave and was the birthplace of Sir Noël Coward Waldegrave Road was named after Frances Waldegrave, the widow of the 7th Earl Waldegrave who lived at Strawberry Hill House, situated on the road in the 19th century.

The road is split into two sections - a Teddington (TW11) part and a Twickenham (TW1) section. The Teddington part of Waldegrave Road is noted for late Victorian semi-detached villas.

This road, connecting Teddington with Strawberry Hill, was at first known as Fry’s Lane. In the early nineteenth century it became Factory Lane after Alexander Barclay built a wax manufacturing factory in 1800. After the death of Frances, Lady Waldegrave, in 1879, the name changed to its modern form.

Following enclosure at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a large pond covered the south west part of the road at the centre of Teddington. In 1863, a new railway track was built through the site of the pond. A road bridge was constructed to reunite the two parts of Teddington that had been ...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

Reply
Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

NOVEMBER
29
2016

 

Rupert Street, W1D
Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I. Cutting across Shaftesbury Avenue from Chinatown up into Soho, Rupert Street was named in 1676 after Prince Rupert of the Rhine: the nephew of King Charles I. Rupert was a charismatic figure who rode into battle with his pet poodle.

Between the site of Panton Square and Colman Hedge Lane (now Wardour Street) lay a plot of ground bounded on the south by the lane leading from the Military Yard to Piccadilly (now Coventry Street), and on the north by Knaves’ Acre. A map of 1664 marks the whole plot as ’parish Land’.

After the Restoration the whole of the Bailiwick of St. James, of which this ground formed a part, was leased by Queen Henrietta Maria and her trustees to the trustees of Henry Jermyn, Earl of St. Albans. In 1676 Charles II granted the freehold of the plot to St. Albans in exchange for the surrender by the latter of his leasehold interest in Nell Gwynne’s house in Pall Mall. The ground was then described as a long slip of...
»more


NOVEMBER
27
2016

 

George Lane, N2
George Lane ran from Hampstead Lane to East End Road. In the south part of what was originally the extent of Finchley, there were two lanes in 1754.

Hampstead Lane, which crossed the southern tip of the parish on its way from Highgate to Hampstead, and George Lane, which ran north from Hampstead Lane to Spaniards Farm and thence, by field paths, to East End Road.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
24
2016

 

Gwendwr Garden
Gwendwr Gardens is a small park in West Kensington. In 1948 the area was donated to Fulham Council by the Gunter Estate for a memorial to the victims of German air raids in the area.

The park contains a pond, lawns and a commemorative plaque.


»read full article


NOVEMBER
20
2016

 

InterContinental London
InterContinental London Park Lane is a luxury 5-star hotel. It is located at 1 Hamilton Place on Hyde Park Corner with Park Lane, close to the shopping centre of Knightsbridge and Piccadilly.The hotel is operated by the InterContinental Hotels Group as part of the InterContinental chain, and was built in 1974.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
19
2016

 

Five Bells
The Five Bells dates from 1751. The pub had the reputation as a centre of boxing and a number of champions trained there including the heavyweight and mediumweight champion Jem Mace.


»read full article


NOVEMBER
14
2016

 

Shenley Road water tank
Shenley Road tank was a fire prevention feature of Boreham Wood. This brick structure was a bunded tank. It was full of water for the fire brigade to use should there be a fire at the nearby studios.

Local children would catch sticklebacks there.

»read full article


NOVEMBER
13
2016

 

105 Shenley Road, WD6
105 Shenley Road lies along the main street of Borehamwood. In the early 1900s, this was the 12th of 21 cottages, running west to east, built along the north side of Shenley Road, ending where Clarendon Road met the main road.

In 1960, the cottages were demolished and in 1961, between 83 and 123 Shenley Road, shops to serve the growing population of Boreham Wood took their place.

In 1976, according to the research of local historian Vic Rowntree, this was the site of Halford’s.

In the 2010s, Santander Bank was here.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
11
2016

 

St Augustine’s, Kilburn
St Augustine’s was founded by Richard Carr Kirkpatrick in the Anglo-Catholic tradition in 1870 and listed as a Grade I building by Historic England. Kirkpatrick formed the church after his parish at St. Mary’s, Kilburn, where he served as curate, received an evangelical vicar unsympathetic to the Anglo-Catholic movement.

By 1871, a foundation stone had been laid and the original ’iron church’ was subsequently replaced by a much more ambitious building, a Gothic Revival church designed by John Loughborough Pearson.

Pearson’s plans called for a red brick structure, vaulted ceilings, and extensive interior stone sculpture in a style reminiscent of 13th-century Gothic architecture. The church was consecrated in 1880, but the tower and spire, remarkable for such Victorian era structures, were not constructed until 1897-1898.

Sir Giles Gilbert Scott designed the reredos (altar screens) for the high altar in 1930. He also designed the reredos of the Lady Chapel and the Stations of the Cross. In 1878, two years prior to the dedication of the church, contemporary historian Edward Walfor...
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NOVEMBER
10
2016

 

Tower Hamlets College
Tower Hamlets College is a large further education and a constituent college of New City College. The college has four different campuses: the largest is on Poplar High Street, about 700 m north of Canary Wharf; the others are at Arbour Square, Bethnal Green and the East India Dock Road. The college is housed in the former School of Marine Engineering and Navigation established by the London County Council opened in 1906.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
8
2016

 

Home House
Home House is a Georgian town house at 20 Portman Square. James Wyatt was appointed to design it by Elizabeth, Countess of Home in 1776, but by 1777 he had been dismissed and replaced by Robert Adam. Elizabeth left the completed house on her death in 1784 to her nephew William Gale, who in turn left it to one of his aunts, Mrs Walsh, in 1785. Its later occupants included the Marquis de la Luzerne during his time as French ambassador to the Court of St. James’s (1788 to 1791), the 4th Duke of Atholl (1798 to 1808), the Duke of Newcastle (1820 to 1861), Sir Francis Henry Goldsmid (1862 to 1919), and Lord and Lady Islington (1919 to 1926).

In 1926, it was leased by Samuel Courtauld to house his growing art collection. On his wife’s death in 1931, he gave the house and the collection to the fledgling Courtauld Institute of Art (which he had played a major part in founding) as temporary accommodation. A permanent accommodation was not forthcoming, and the Institute remained in the building until 1989, when it moved to its prese...
»more


NOVEMBER
4
2016

 

Eland House, SW1E
Eland House is an office building on Bressenden Place. Eland House was designed by EPR Architects and built by Mowlem for Land Securities, and although finally completed in 1998, staff of the former Department of the Environment had moved in in late 1995/early 1996.

The building is 59 metres tall, with 11 floors providing 35 000 square metres of office space housing 2500 staff. It incorporates a number of environmental features including a cogeneration plant and active solar panels.

»read full article


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