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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
JANUARY
16
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
The 1912 streets of Spitalfields
The fascinating story of one man’s random walk in 1912 On Saturday 20 April 1912, a man by the name of C.A. Mathew - a resident of Brightlingsea, Essex - came out of Liverpool Street Station carrying his camera. There’s no telling why he decided to walk the streets of Spitalfields and take photographs on that day - it may well have been a commission but, over a hundred years later, nobody really knows.

NOTE: Many writers about C.A. Mathew’s tour of Spitalfields, including the gentle author, have assumed Liverpool Street station’s involvement in the story. This is a safe assumption - the London terminus of the route from Brightlingsea but is not a definite! But we’ll run with it too...

Matthew only took up photography in 1911, the previous year. Eleven years later, he died. He produced no other known work and little else is known about him.

»more

NOVEMBER
16
2021

 

Suffield Road, SE17
Suffield Road was laid out after the demise of the Royal Surrey Zoological Gardens The Royal Surrey Zoological Gardens grew out of a menagerie started by Edward Cross in 1831 - he had previously exhibited at Exeter Change in the Strand.

The gardens were designed by Henry Phillips and highly praised - they were compared favourably with the Regent’s Park Zoological Gardens. The land of the zoo had previously been the 19-acre Lorrimore Common.

Cages for lions, tigers and other animals were enclosed within a glasshouse, 300 feet in circumference.

The gardens covered roughly the area between Suffield Road on the north, Lorrimore Road to the south, Penrose Street and Borrett Road on the east, and Chapter Road/Delverton Road to the west.

Edward Cross retired in 1844 and, under the new management of William Tyler, fell under hard times. He sold the animals in 1855 in order to keep the enterprise afloat but in 1856 seven people were killed in a stampede during a sermon by a local Baptist minister. The resulti...
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NOVEMBER
15
2021

 

Bow Locks
Bow Locks is a set of bi-directional locks in Bromley-by-Bow Bow Locks link the tidal Bow Creek to the River Lee Navigation.

The first recorded mention of water control at the site was during the reign of Edward I. Henry de Bedyk of Halliwell Priory and owner of the nearby tide mills erected a structure some time before 1307. A description of its operation in 1416 indicates that it consisted of a dam with a navigable 18 feet wide channel through it. The owners of the mills rebuilt the structure - now referred to as a lock - in 1573.

With the river was important for trade, an engineer called John Smeaton was asked to recommend improvements in 1765. He suggested a cut from Bow Locks to Limehouse. The Limehouse Cut was opened in 1777, but the lock was not altered.

A pound lock was constructed between 1851 and 1852, to accommodate barges up to 108 by 20 feet. The trustees imposed a toll for using the lock but this was unpopular with the bargees. A compromise was reached, where use of the lock required t...
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NOVEMBER
14
2021

 

Highams Park Estate, IG8
The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961 In 1947 Walthamstow Council erected prefab homes in Highams Park - some of the layout of the roads is still visible in the park. These were erected in order to address the local post-war shortage of homes after bombing.

Three years earlier, the Churchill coalition government introduced the Housing (Temporary Accommodation) Act to provide temporary houses - there was an anticipated shortfall of 200 000 homes. The proposal was to address the shortfall by building 500 000 pre-fabricated houses with a planned lifetime of ten years within a five year period. These became popularly known as ’prefabs’.

At the end of the war, the Labour government of Clement Attlee, agreed to deliver 300 000 units within a decade, within a budget of ÃÆ’Æ’Æ’ÃÆ’¢â‚¬ÅÃâ€...
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NOVEMBER
13
2021

 

Folgate Street, E1
Folgate Street, formerly White Lion Yard and White Lion Street, has 17th century origins The development of Folgate Street by the St John and Tillard Estate did not involve building a new street but repurposing an existing one - this older street ran from Wheler Street to Norton Folgate and had probably been developed from a yard, perhaps at about the same time that Wheler Street was built. In the late seventeenth century, Folgate Street was known as White Lion Yard.

The western end of the street is shown in the Hollar map dating after the Great Fire. In the 1675 tax returns, sixty houses were listed as being in White Lion Yard. The street was most likely completely rebuilt by the mid-eighteenth century.

One of more building leases were granted in 1697 and in 1704 White Lion Yard was "a certain place - commonly called White Lyon Yard intended to be rebuilt and called White Lyon Street". On plans of 1711-12, the lower part of Blossom Street, shown as Sote’s Hole, is in existence. Some of the buildings on the north side of White L...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

FEBRUARY
28
2017

 

The Holly Bush
The Holly Bush was an Elstree pub. The site of The Holly Bush has been occupied since at least medieval times, with the present building dating from around 1450.

The first reference to it as an inn was in 1786, when it was also owned by Thomas Clutterbuck, and managed by a John Green.

It closed in the 2010s.
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FEBRUARY
28
2017

 

The Green Dragon
The Green Dragon was situated at 12-15 High Street, Elstree. At Nos. 12-15 The High Street stood a long, timber-framed building dating from c1500 and there was an inn there as early as 1656.

No 12 was separated from the others, faced in brick and called The Green Dragon during the 18th century.

By 1939 it had reverted to retail but survived the demolition of Nos. 13 – 15 in the late 1960s.
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FEBRUARY
28
2017

 

Red Lion Hotel
The Red Lion Hotel stood on the east side of the High Street on the corner of Barnet Lane. The Red Lion Hotel, a timber framed building, in Elstree High Street, was first mentioned in 1656. In 1833 it was run by John Billings (born 1809) who was described in 1839 as a ‘coachman running the posting house’.

By 1845 he was known as a ‘coach proprietor’ his license allowing him to carry four inside and five on top. The route was London –Edgware – Shenley Hill, a distance of 17 miles.

It departed from Blue Posts Holborn at 4 pm, Shenley at 8 am, the journey time being 3 hours!

John retired to be a farmer at aged 71, the 1881 census shows him and his wife Sarah at ‘Smug Oak Farm’ Frogmore, Herts, employing four men to manage 168 acres.

He died in 1885, and the Red Lion was demolished in 1934 to make way for improvements to the dangerous corner at the junction of the High Street and Barnet Lane.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
28
2017

 

The Plough
The Plough was a pub next to Elstree crossroads. Elstree Village once boasted around seven pubs in the main street.

The Plough was called The Swan in the mid 17th Century and acquired by Thomas Clutterbuck, a brewer of Stanmore, just before 1816.

The present building dates from 1830/40 and in the 1930s, when under contract at the film studios, Alfred Hitchcock was a regular patron.

Elstree was a popular stop over along Watling Street on journeys to and from London. A victualler’s billing of 1756 stated that the White Horse had two beds and five horses, the Plough one bed and one horse and the Green Dragon one bed and no horses. By 1833 four major stage coaches called at Elstree daily.

In the early twenty first century, the Plough became a restaurant rather than a pub.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
28
2017

 

Abbey Place, WC1H
Abbey Place was in the centre of Bloomsbury, off what was originally the west side of Little Coram Street and directly behind the Russell Institution on Great Coram Street. Abbey Place was also known as Tavistock Mews, the adjacent street to which it actually led.

It was built in 1801 on a green field site. Rather intriguingly, Horwood’s map of 1799, which has some of the proposed streets and squares laid out, shows a circle at this point, and a street leading from here all the way to the burial grounds on the line of what became Henrietta Street.

It appears separately as Abbey Place, rather than as Tavistock Mews, on the first Ordnance Survey map of 1867–1870. The origin of its rather grandiose name is unknown; the site was not near any abbey

The name was current by 1829, when a young man advertised himself as porter or driver from “7 Abbey-place, Little Coram-street, Tavistock Square” (The Times, 19 February 1829)

It rapidly became one of the very few slum areas on the Bedford ducal estate. In 1862, a 19-year-old labourer named Edward Donnelly lived at no. 6; he was charged with taking...
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FEBRUARY
27
2017

 

Shepherd’s Bush Market
Shepherd’s Bush Market is a street market located on the east side of the railway viaduct for the Hammersmith and City Tube line. The market dates back to the early part of the twentieth century, when the present layout of the Hammersmith and City tube line was fixed. The market opened for business in around 1914, with shops lining the railway viaduct. Individual market vendors sell a wide variety of goods, including fresh produce, cooked food, music CDs, household goods and clothing. Individual vendors rent their stalls from Transport For London, who own the land on which the market sits.

With a wide variety of fresh produce, fabrics, household goods and furnishings the market has long stood as a one stop shop for the local community, gaining a reputation as one of the most diverse locations this side of London. Many traders in the market have passed their sites down for generations.
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FEBRUARY
23
2017

 

Baker Street
Baker Street tube station is a station on the London Underground at the junction of Baker Street and the Marylebone Road. The station lies in Travelcard Zone 1 and is served by five different lines. It is one of the original stations of the Metropolitan Railway (MR), the world’s first underground railway, opened in 1863. Baker Street station was opened by the MR on 10 January 1863 (these platforms are now served by the Circle and Hammersmith & City lines). On 13 April 1868, the MR opened the first section of Metropolitan and St John’s Wood Railway as a branch from its existing route. This line, serving the open-air platforms, was steadily extended to Willesden Green and northwards, finally reaching Aylesbury Town and Verney Junction (some 50 miles/80 km from Baker Street) in 1892.

Over the next few decades this section of the station was extensively rebuilt to provide four platforms. The current Metropolitan line layout largely dates from 1925, and the bulk of the surface buildings, designed by architect Charles Clark, also date from this period.

The Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR, now the Bakerloo line) opened on 10 March 1906; Baker Street was the temporary northern terminus of the line until it was extended to Marylebone station on 27 March 1907.
<...
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FEBRUARY
19
2017

 

Horse Hospital
Built as stabling for cabby’s sick horses, The Horse Hospital is now a unique Grade II listed arts venue in Bloomsbury WC1 The Horse Hospital is the only existing unspoilt example of a two-floor, purpose-built stable remaining for public access in London.

It is situated at the corner of Herbrand Street and Colonnade – a working mews immediately behind the Hotel Russell, midway between London’s West End and Spitalfields arts district. Built originally in 1797 by James Burton, the building may have been redeveloped sometime after 1860.

The shell is constructed with London Stocks and red brick detail, whilst the interior features a mock cobbled herringbone pattern re-enforced concrete floor. Access to the both floors is by concrete moulded ramps. The upper floor ramp retains hardwood slats preventing the horses from slipping. Each floor has five cast iron pillars and several original iron tethering rings.
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FEBRUARY
17
2017

 

Tee Shaped Wood
Tee Shaped Wood was a woodland in the fields of Boreham Wood. Originally a footpath from Boundary Oak in Theobald Street to Green Street passed through this point. The wood was quite dense in places and stretched all the way down to the modern Gateshead Road.

Near to Crown Road, the greenery still has a few large oak trees from the wood.

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FEBRUARY
16
2017

 

Furzehill Road, WD6
Furzehill Road runs from Shenley Road to Barnet Lane. Several roads in Boreham Wood including Barnet Lane, Furzehill Road, Shenley Road, Allum Lane and Theobald Street, were created as a result of the Enclosure Act of 1776, whereby the 684 acres of Borehamwood Common were divided up amongst various landowners, including the Church, and in return new roads were laid out which were to be sixty feet wide including verges.

Old photos from the nineteenth century show this verge intact and it can still be seen to the south of the junction with Brownlow Road.

In 1910 the Council handed over four acres of allotment land for the building of Furzehill School, and the plot-holders were awarded £1 each in compensation. The Council then purchased another four acres for £300.00 for allotment land, and a further 7 acres in 1924, just off Furzehill Road, for the sum of £157.1s.4d.

At the southern end of Furzehill Road was the Home of Rest For Horses until the 1970s.

Apart from the Barnet Lan...
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FEBRUARY
15
2017

 

Maxilla Gardens, W10
Maxilla Gardens was a former street in London W10. It was demolished to make way for the Westway.
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FEBRUARY
15
2017

 

Ebury Farm
Ebury Farm was a simple marshy farm whose lands later became the richest real estate in London. Ebury Farm covered 430 acres in total with its farmhouse laying just to the south of where Victoria coach station now stands.

Earlier, there was a manor called Eia in the Domesday survey but later known as Eye, from which Eybury or Ebury derives. The manor probably occupied the territory between the Roman road along the present course of Bayswater Road and Oxford Street on the north, the Thames on the south, the Westbourne river on the west, and the Tyburn on the east.

After the Norman Conquest Geoffrey de Mandeville obtained possession of the manor, one of many which he took in reward for his services in the Conqueror’s cause. Before the end of William’s reign de Mandeville had given the manor to the Abbey of Westminster and it remained in the Abbey’s ownership until 1536 when it was acquired by Henry VIII. During this long period two areas came to be distinguished from the main manor. The areas were Hyde in the north-west corner, now incorporated ...
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FEBRUARY
15
2017

 

Willesden Green Farm
Willesden Green Farm, owned by All Souls College, Oxford, was south of the High Road, opposite Willesden Farm. By 1738 farmhouses and cottages were clustered all round Willesden Green.

The soil of Willesden Green was a strong, wet clay - naturally suited to grass, and a cart could fetch a load of dung from the metropolis twice a day. By 1833 the Willesden Green Farm, had been much improved by manuring.

Londoners were often directly involved in farming and All Souls Willesden Green Farm was leased to a St Marylebone jobmaster between 1828-45.

Building began in 1895 on land belonging to All Souls and on the college’s land south of High Road in 1899 - Willesden Green farmhouse had gone by 1904. In that year 125 houses were being built on the college estate at Willesden Green in addition to 55 already built.
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FEBRUARY
14
2017

 

Westminster Under School
Westminster Under School is an independent school and preparatory school for boys aged 7 to 13 and is attached to Westminster School. The school was founded in 1943 in the precincts of Westminster School in Little Dean’s Yard, just behind Westminster Abbey. In 1951 the Under School relocated to its own premises in Vincent Square. Due to rising numbers of pupils in the 1960s and 1970s, the school moved again in 1981 to its present site (which was a former hospital) overlooking the Westminster School playing fields in Vincent Square. The school has a strong musical tradition and provides choristers for St Margaret’s Church, Westminster Abbey. It also excels in sport, drama, chess and Latin. Most boys attending the school move on to Westminster School after the completion of either Common Entrance or Scholarship examinations.
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FEBRUARY
10
2017

 

North Greenwich Pier
North Greenwich Pier is a pier on the River Thames. North Greenwich Pier was originally built in the 1880s as a coaling jetty for the former Greenwich gasworks before this closed in the late 1980s. Most of the original jetty was demolished in 1997 to make way for the new passenger pier; however eight of the original cast iron caisson columns were retained to secure the new floating pier. Antony Gormley’s ’Quantum Cloud’ statue stands on the downstream group of four caissons.

The new pier was designed by architect Richard Rogers Partnership with Beckett Rankine as the engineer and Costain as main contractor. The most striking feature of the pier is its 87 metre long, 160 tonne, bowstring canting brow which, unusually, is supported on three bearings.

The pier is served by river boat services.



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FEBRUARY
5
2017

 

White City bus station
White City bus station serves the Westfield London shopping centre. It was opened on 29 November 2008 to serve the Westfield London and the White City area. The station was built around the Grade II listed Dimco Buildings, originally the power station for the Central London Railway which date from 1898.
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FEBRUARY
3
2017

 

Honourable Artillery Company Museum
The Honourable Artillery Company Museum opened in 1987. Its collection includes uniforms, armour, medals and weapons. The archives date from 1537 and are of particular interest for 17th and 18th century militia and items about the City of London history.

It is associated with the Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest regiment in the British Army. Entrance is free, although it is only open to the public by appointment.
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