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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
FEBRUARY
8
2023

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

»more

AUGUST
22
2022

 

Lover’s Walk, SE21
The walkway between Gallery Road and College Road has had many names There was a medieval field system between the two roads. In 1989, the Museum of London carried out an exploratory dig here to verify this. Amongt the fields, a path became known as Lovers Lane or Pensioners’ Walk.

In 1768 the right of way received an official name - The Grove. Grove Field lay on its south side.

Lover’s Walk had become its informal name by 1876 - in May that year, a news report recorded an incident here. In 2012, the Dulwich Estate agreed to calls for Lover’s Walk to be the formal name.

For cyclists it has yet another name - it is part of the Traylen Trail.


»read full article


AUGUST
21
2022

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
»more


AUGUST
20
2022

 

Rainham Road, NW10
Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895 The United Land Company bought a 6 acre triangle of land between Harrow Road and the Hampstead Junction railway in 1879, and an adjoining 21 acres from All Souls College in 1882. The whole area was laid out as high-density terraced housing and shops as far east as College Road.

The college leased 13 acres south of the L&NWR railway line to Edward Vigers, who by 1888 had laid out roads and started building 134 small terraced houses.

Rainham Road was let on building leases in 1895 and 30 houses had been built there by 1898.
»read full article


AUGUST
19
2022

 

Eton Avenue, NW3
Eton Avenue runs parallel with Adelaide Road, two blocks north From 1873 onward, William Willett and his son worked together as the chief building team in the area. In the early 1880s, they accepted the challenge of the Eton College estate by constructing Eton Avenue and surrounding roads.

The Willetts then moved on to both Lyndhurst Gardens and Wedderburn Road.

The houses set a precedent for aesthetic architecture in the speculative market. Drawing inspiration from English Queen Anne designs of the late 17th century, they were built with red brick, steep pitched roofs and tall chimneys. Dormers, gables, ornamental glass and ornamentation were other features that set them apart. Every single house was distinct.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

Reply

   
Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


Reply
Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

Reply

BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

MARCH
30
2017

 

Little Paternoster Row, E1
Little Paternoster Row was once known as French Alley. It was a narrow alleyway running north-south from Brushfield Street to Dorset Street where it emerged between Nos.35 (Crossingham’s Lodging House) and 36 Dorset Street. Entry from Brushfield Street was via a covered archway next to the Oxford Arms public house at No.62.

In 1888, Little Paternoster Row was lined on its west side by a row of tenements and on its east side by Crossingham’s.

Little Paternoster Row was classed as ’black’ (vicious, semi-criminal) in Charles Booth’s 1898 map of London Poverty. The surveyor’s original notebook entries describe it thus:
"2 & 3 storey common lodging houses. Ragged women, children, holey toeless boots; windows dirty patched with brown paper and broken. Prostitutes, thieves and ponces. Buildings owned by the notorious Jack McCarthy of Dorset Street."

It was demolished in 1928 along with the north side of Dorset Street to make way for extensions to Spitalfields Market.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2017

 

Breezer’s Hill, E1W
Breezer’s Hill is a short, narrow hill running between The Highway (formerly Ratcliffe Highway and St George Street) and Pennington Street. Its west side was lined with the wool warehouses of Gooch & Cousens and on the east side were a number of small dwellings, numbered 1 to 5. Two pubs were situated on the street; ’The White Bear’ on the north east corner at 1 St. George Street and on the ’Red Lion’ on the south east corner at 60 Pennington Street.

Breezer’s Hill still exists and has warehouses on both sides.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2017

 

29 Aldgate High Street
29 Aldgate High Street is a demolished property, originally on the north side of Aldgate High Street.. These were premises in front of which Catherine Eddowes was found drunk by PC Louis Robinson.

According to PC Robinson’s inquest testimony, he was on duty in Aldgate High Street at 8.30pm, 29 September 1888 when he saw a crowd outside No.29 - he found Eddowes lying on the pavement. He picked her up and carried her to the side by some shutters and she fell sideways. He got assistance from PC George Simmons and they took her to Bishopsgate Police Station.

Officially, there was no 29 Aldgate High Street in 1888 and it does not appear in any census returns from 1871 to 1901; the numbering, though consecutive on that side, goes from 28 to 30. Research conducted by the late Adrian Phypers in 2001 managed to shed some light on the mystery:

In the late 1860s numbers 28 and 29 were both used by a wine importer. In about 1870 he sold up and the properties were taken on by a Henry Phillips, furniture warehouseman. A year or two later his Kell...
»more


MARCH
30
2017

 

St James’s Passage, EC3A
St James’s Passage was formerly known as Church Passage. Formerly a narrow passage leading from Duke Street (now Duke’s Place) to Mitre Square. In the 18th century it went by the name of ’Dark Entry’.

The passage tapered from 18 feet wide at its entrance in Mitre Square, to 5 feet wide within only a distance of a couple of paces. Above its entrance to Mitre Square hung a wall mounted gas lamp.

Church Passage was renamed St James’s Passage on 1st July 1939. A footbridge was added from the Kearley & Tonge warehouse on its north side to the warehouse opposite just after the Second World War. It was significantly widened c.1974 following the demolition of the buildings.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2017

 

Fashion Street, E1
Fashion Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Brick Lane to Commercial Street. Fashion Street marks the northern boundary of the original Fossan Estate, owned by brothers Thomas and Lewis Fossan. The southern side was laid out c.1655 and it was originally known as Fossan Street, which was later corrupted to Fashion. The northern side was built by trustees of the Wheler estate in about 1669. White’s Row was at one time depicted as a natural continuation of the street and was known as New Fashion Street in the 17th century.

By the late-Victorian era, Fashion Street had fallen into decline alongside other streets on the estate and was considered part of the area’s worst slums, especially the south side which was connected to notorious Flower and Dean Street by a number of squalid courts and passages. There were also pubs at each end of the street; the Queen’s Head on the northern corner with Commercial Street, the ’George and Guy’ on the northern corner with Brick Lane and the ’Three Cranes’ opposite - none o...
»more


MARCH
30
2017

 

Chamber Street, E1
Chamber Street is a thoroughfare running east-west from Leman Street to Mansell Street. The north side of Chamber Street originally included buildings of the London Infirmary (then based in adjacent Prescot Street) until 1757 when it moved to Whitechapel Road and became the London Hospital.

Chamber Street has been extensively rebuilt and includes the Aldgate East Travelodge (which sits over Abel’s Buildings) and the English Martyrs’ Club. Most of the railway arches on the south side are garages and private lock-ups.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2017

 

Holles Street, W1C
Holles Street runs north from Oxford Street, on the east side of the John Lewis store. John Holles, Duke of Newcastle, who bought much of the land of the area. In 1711 that land passed to his daughter Henrietta Cavendish Holles who later married Edward Harley, second Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer. This meant that Henrietta Harley held the titles of Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer. As a family they were hardly ‘shrinking violets’ because, if you look at the surrounding land, the name of every family member is perpetrated by the streets and squares nearby.

The street was one of those laid out around 1729 when the area north of Oxford Street was urbanised on a grid pattern.

Once the location of small shops and houses, the street is now almost entirely taken up the John Lewis department store on the western side and the former British Home Stores department store (1962-63) and other commercial units on the east, both of which have their main entrances on Oxford Street. The John Lewis store was started in 1936 but damaged by bom...
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MARCH
29
2017

 

48 Belgrave Square
48 Belgrave Square was occupied for the same family for 170 years. The house was bought in 1840 by Col. Christopher Hamilton MP from the Grosvenor Estate and was the Hamilton family's main London house, the house eventually passed to his granddaughter Sarah Winter in 1890 who continued to live there until her death in 1945. During Mrs Sarah Winter's ownership the house, under the name Hamilton House was the setting for some of London's biggest social events, the annual Hamilton House Christmas Ball was a key feature in the London social calendar. The house was also linked to huge controversy in the run up to the Second World War, Mrs Winter, a known Nazi supporter, used the house as a way of raising money for the Anglo-German Fellowship.

The house was not retained after the war instead being rented out, the family retained a flat in the service part of the house.

It currently serves as the residence of the Mexican Ambassador to the United Kingdom.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2017

 

St Mary’s Harrow Road
St Mary’s Harrow Road was built as the infirmary for the Paddington Workhouse. In 1847 a new workhouse was built by the Paddington Guardians to house its poor, as the neighbouring Kensington workhouse, which had been used until then, had become too crowded.

The Paddington workhouse was located on the north bank of the Grand Union Canal, to the south of Harrow Road. In 1868 its sick wards were extended and new offices and a dispensary also added.

In 1883 work began on a separate infirmary building, which was sited between the workhouse and the adjacent Lock Hospital. It would cost £1,100 and contain six wards, including a lying-in ward and a lunatic observation ward, as well as a dispensary. A midwife was engaged and a Relieving Officer for the dispensary, but the contractors went bankrupt and the infirmary was not completed until 1885.

The Paddington Infirmary opened in 1886. It was a long 4-storey building with a basement, and lay on a north-south axis. It contained 284 beds, although some sick beds remained i...
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MARCH
28
2017

 

Paddington Green Children’s Hospital
The Paddington Green Children’s Hospital opened in August 1883. In 1862 Drs Eustace Smith and T.C. Kirby established the North West London Free Dispensary for Sick Children at 12 Bell Street, Edgware Road, as a charity for children of the poor. The Dispensary provided medical treatment for any child without notice or recommendation.

The premises at Bell Street soon became too small and, in the early 1880s, £7,000 was raised to buy two houses in Church Street on the northeast corner of Paddington Green. These were converted into a hospital.

The Paddington Green Children’s Hospital opened in August 1883. In 1888 an iron hut was built in the grounds to serve as an Out-Patients Department and waiting room.

By 1892 the Hospital had 27 beds for boys up to the age of 12 years and girls up to the age of 14. In 1893 a serious outbreak of diphtheria, the source of which could not be traced, caused the Hospital to close and the main buildings to be demolished. It was then discovered that two old cesspit...
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MARCH
28
2017

 

Princess Louise Hospital
The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women. The origins of this Hospital lay in the Kensington Dispensary, which opened in 1815 at 13 Holland Street. By 1845 the premises were becoming too small for the increasing number of patients and, in 1849, the Dispensary moved to 49 Church Street, where it remained for the next 75 years

The proportion of children attending the Dispensary had steadily increased and the Medical Board decided what was really needed was a Children’s Hospital. In 1924 Queen Victoria’s daughter, Princess Louise, who was President of the Kensington Dispensary, held a conference about this in her home in Kensington Palace. During this meeting it was decided that the Dispensary should move to North Kensington as the Church Street site was at least two miles away from its neediest patients.

A site on the War Memorial playing field was purchased in 1925 and the foundation stone laid a year later by the Princess. The new road of Pangbourne Avenue was created to serve it.»more


MARCH
28
2017

 

St Mary’s Hospital, London
St Mary’s Hospital is a hospital in Paddington, founded in 1845. St Mary’s Hospital first opened its doors to patients in 1851, the last of the great voluntary hospitals to be founded.

With the shift towards community healthcare delivered in the early 20th century, partly due to the social medicine revolution, pressure on bed occupancy relaxed, and with the formation of the National Health Service in the 1940s, many of the local hospitals of the St Mary’s teaching hospital group eventually closed and relocated services to the Paddington basin site.

The hospital site incorporates the private Lindo wing where several celebrity and royal births have occurred. The wing is named after Frank Charles Lindo, a businessman and board-member of the hospital, who donated £111,500 before his death in 1938.

The laboratory where Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin has been restored to its cramped condition of 1928 and incorporated into a museum about the discovery and his life and work.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2017

 

Albert Dock Seamen’s Hospital
The Albert Dock Seamen’s Hospital was a hospital provided by the Seamen’s Hospital Society for the care of ex-members of the Merchant navy, the fishing fleets and their dependents. It was opened in 1890 as a branch of the Dreadnought Seamen’s Hospital, Greenwich. The London School of Tropical Medicine was established here in October 1899, by Sir Patrick Manson with assistance from the British Secretary of State for the Colonies (Joseph Chamberlain). Together with the Hospital for Tropical Diseases they moved to Euston in February 1920.

The Hospital was relocated to a new site on nearby Alnwick Road (east of Felsted Road) in 1937-1938 and became part of Newham Health District under the City and East London Area Health Authority (Teaching) in 1974 and was converted from acute to orthopaedic use. It came under the direct control of Newham Health Authority in 1981 and subsequently became a homeward bound mental handicap unit which closed in 1993.

The hospital buildings were demolished in 1993 except for one range which retains its 1930s brown brick elevations and central rendered pediment, now converted to residential use
»read full article


MARCH
28
2017

 

Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea Hospital
Queen Charlotte’s and Chelsea Hospital is one of the oldest maternity hospitals in Europe, dating from 1739, and until 1998 occupied a site in Goldhawk Road. The hospital strictly dates its foundation to 1739 when Sir Richard Manningham founded a hospital of lying-in beds in a 17-room house in Jermyn Street. This was called the General Lying in Hospital, and was the first of its kind in Britain. Some sources date the foundation to 1752, the year in which the hospital relocated from Jermyn Street to St Marylebone, and first became a teaching institution.

In 1809 Queen Charlotte, the wife of King George III, became its patron, having been persuaded by her son to become involved. A Royal Charter was incorporated in 1885 and when this was amended in 1924 the present name came into use. The hospital subsequently merged with the Chelsea Hospital for Women and is now based at the Hammersmith Hospital site in West London to which it was relocated in 1998. The hospital was originally a voluntary hospital. At different times over the years the hospital has been located in Bayswater, on Marylebone Road and at Ravenscourt Park. The Chel...
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MARCH
28
2017

 

Hospital of St Thomas of Acre
The Hospital of St Thomas of Acre was the medieval London headquarters of the Knights of Saint Thomas. It was founded as a church in 1227 in the parish of St Mary Colechurch, birthplace of the order’s patron saint, Saint Thomas Becket. In the 14th century and after it was the main headquarters of the military order.

In 1512, the Worshipful Company of Mercers bought from the order a site by the church on which to build their hall, and in 1514 they formally became the patron to the order.

In 1538, during the Protestant Reformation, the order was dissolved and the properties were forfeit to the crown, but were subsequently acquired by the Mercers in exchange for various payments, rents, and undertakings.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2017

 

Foundling Hospital
The Foundling Hospital in London was founded in 1741 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. It was a children's home established for the education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children. The word 'hospital' was used in a more general sense than it is today, simply indicating the institution's hospitality to those less fortunate.

The first children were admitted to the Foundling Hospital on 25 March 1741, into a temporary house located in Hatton Garden. At first, no questions were asked about child or parent, but a distinguishing token was put on each child by the parent. These were often marked coins, trinkets, pieces of cotton or ribbon, verses written on scraps of paper. Clothes, if any, were carefully recorded. One entry in the record reads, Paper on the breast, clout on the head. The applications became too numerous, and a system of balloting with red, white and black balls was adopted. Children were seldom taken after they were twelve months old.

On reception, children were sent to wet nurses in the countryside...
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MARCH
27
2017

 

Devonshire Hill Farm
Devonshire Hill Farm was part of the manorial land owned by the Curtis family. Formerly known as Clay Hill, in 1881, William Michael Curtis, and fellow trustees of the Curtis Settled Estates, enfranchised the Clay Hill land which was sold to the copyhold tenant, Frederick Alderton.

At the turn of the twentieth century, Devonshire Hill Farm was reached by a winding lane from White Hart Lane passing Devonshire Hill Lodge, River House and terminating at Devonshire Hill Farm, owned by the New River Company. This lane eventually become a road, Devonshire Hill Lane.

»read full article


MARCH
25
2017

 

Upton Farm
Upton Farm began in 1725 and was gone by 1839. The whole Bayswater district of streets, squares, terraces, and crescents sprung into existence in the course of about ten years, between 1839 and 1849.

Before Bayswater was built up, Hopwood’s Nursery Ground and the Victoria Gardens - famed for running-matches and other sporting meetings - faced the dull brick wall which effectually shut out the green glades and leafy avenues of Kensington Gardens from the view of passengers along the Bayswater Road.

Bayswater - derived from the name "Bayard’s Watering Place" - was noted of old for its springs, reservoirs, and conduits, supplying the greater part of the City of London with water. The running streams and gravelly soil were at one time highly favourable for the growth of watercress.

On a slanting grassy bank, about a hundred yards from the back of the line of houses now bearing the name of Craven Hill, stood until about 1820, an ancient stone-built conduit-house, whence the water-suppl...
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MARCH
22
2017

 

Uxendon Farm
Uxendon was once more important than Wembley. Uxendon, first recorded in a transaction concerning Hugh of Woxindon in 1257, was a small settlement on the western slopes of Barn Hill. The first part of the name is the same as that in the name Uxbridge and stems either from the Wixan, a 7th century Anglo-Saxon tribe, or from the Celtic for 'water'. The second part is the Old English for
hill.

Medieval Uxendon was very small, but in the 14th or 15th centuries some local people, including the Uxendon family, moved south to form another small community at Forty Green,
where the Sudbury to Kingsbury road crossed the Lidding at Forty Bridge. This settlement was known as Uxendon Forty, Wembley Forty or Preston Forty. The farm at Forty Green was at first called Pargrave's, and later South Forty Farm.

Uxendon became a submanor under the authority of Harrow Manor Court.

Richard Brembre, a grocer and Lord Mayor of London, lived at Uxendon. In 1388 he executed 22 prisoners w...
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MARCH
21
2017

 

Wyld’s Great Globe
Wyld’s Great Globe was an attraction situated in Leicester Square between 1851 and 1862. It was constructed by James Wyld (1812–1887), a distinguished mapmaker and former Member of Parliament for Bodmin.

At the centre of a purpose-built hall was a giant globe, 60 feet 4 inches in diameter. The globe was hollow and contained a staircase and elevated platforms which members of the public could climb in order to view the surface of the earth on its interior surface, which was modelled in plaster of Paris, complete with mountain ranges and rivers all to scale. Punch described the attraction as "a geographical globule which the mind can take in at one swallow." In the surrounding galleries were displays of Wyld’s maps, globes and surveying equipment.

Wyld originally proposed that the globe should be constructed at the Great Exhibition, but its size and Wyld’s desire to run it as a promotional venture precluded it from being featured inside the Crystal Palace, so Wyld negotiated with the owners of the gardens of Leicester Square, and after mu...
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MARCH
20
2017

 

Hampstead Town
This article first appeared in ’A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 9, Hampstead, Paddington’. The earliest settled area was probably Hampstead town, on the southern slopes of the heath, near the manor and church and on each side of the road to Hendon, later called [[19950|Hampstead High Street]]. The principal parish well, Kingswell, in the heart of the old town and probably associated with the town pond west of High Street, in which a woman drowned in 1274, gave its name to the Kingswell family (fl. 1281-1319) whose freehold property lay between High Street and the demesne on the west. Nearby was the copyhold Slyes and Popes. There was a group of medieval customary tenements in [[26490|Pond Street]], so named by 1484 after another pond which was filled in in 1835 to form South End Green. Four tenants were surnamed atte Pond on the earliest rental (1259) and other medieval tenements, those of the Aldenhams and Bertrams, were in Pond Street.

By the 15th century many of the customary tenements had passed to London merchants and gentry, some of whom began to occupy...
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MARCH
19
2017

 

Adair Road before redevelopment (1964)
A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964. The shop in the image was a greengrocers by then but before the First World War had been a pub. There was still an off licence next door by the 1960s and the next building along was a cafe.
»read full article


MARCH
17
2017

 

Cressalls Farm
Cressalls Farm was a Boreham Wood farm on Theobald Street. The farm would have stood opposite today’s junction of Theobald Street with Gateshead Road. Anthony Road was built through what would have been the farmyard.

The farm is shown on the 1900 map. By the 1940s, the buildings there before still exist but the complex has been renamed "The Beeches". Anthony Road was built in the late 1960s.
»read full article


MARCH
17
2017

 

Thrift Farm (1967)
A rare view of Thrift Farm, before the creation of the "Studio Estate". This is a shot from the series "The Prisoner". This view today would have these people running across Studio Way with the camera at a point hovering above the end of Niven Close.

Thrift Farm was purchased by MGM in the late 1940s when they incorporated it into their massive backlot. The farm continued to be used with sheep grazing on the front fields of the MGM studio. It closed in 1970 when the studio closed and was subsequently demolished. The foundations can still be seen in the foliage off the path behind the Toby Carvery/Hotel
»read full article


MARCH
16
2017

 

Sudbury Park Farm
Sudbury Park Farm was opened by the Barham family in 1897, although its fields had been part of another farm, known as North Farm, by the mid-19th century. George Barham had founded the Express Dairy Company in the 1860s, to bring fresh milk to London from the country by train. Around 1880, the family moved into Crabs House (now part of the Barham Park buildings) on the Harrow Road, and bought the mansion in whose grounds it stood in 1895, renaming it Sudbury Park.

The Express Dairy was already supplying milk to Queen Victoria, but their new “model dairy farm”, across the road from Crabs House, with its pedigree herd of Jersey cattle, allowed George Barham, and his son Titus, to demonstrate the latest methods of dairy farming to other milk producers from around Britain and the world. Milk from the farm was very popular, and some of it was supplied to trans-Atlantic liners. When, the by then, Sir George Barham died in 1913, Titus Barham inherited the Express Dairy retail business and the farm, while his brother, Arthur, took over the Dairy Supply Company wholesale business (later United Dairies on [[38169|One Hundred E...
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MARCH
16
2017

 

Vale Farm
Vale Farm was probably a mixed farm, growing crops and raising livestock for meat, run by a succession of tenant farmers.. Vale Farm existed, on the north-east edge of Sudbury Common, by at least the 18th century, when it was owned by the Lake family, and later by Richard Page of Wembley Park.

By 1875, the farm was owned by the biscuit magnate, Samuel Palmer, and before he died in 1898 it had changed to a dairy farm, with a herd of cows grazing its pastured fields to produce milk. The buildings put up at the time of this change included a new farmhouse.

By the early 20th century, much of Sudbury was still farmland, but the area was starting to be developed for housing, particularly after new railway lines opened (at Sudbury Town in 1903, and to Sudbury and Harrow Road station in 1906). A map given by Wembley’s first estate agent, George H. Ward, ‘for information of intending purchasers’ at this time, shows Vale Farm and some of the new roads for housing nearby.

In the early 1900s, the tenants of Vale Farm were the Panes family.

By...
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MARCH
13
2017

 

Lavender Hill, SW11
Lavender Hill was once famous for the lavender fields which skirted the road. .
»read full article


MARCH
9
2017

 

Shakespeare Drive, WD6
Shakespeare Drive, which was part of the former Furzehill School is part of a development by Persimmon Plc. For its first two years, it was a private road owned by the developers.
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MARCH
8
2017

 

White Conduit Fields
White Conduit Fields in Islington was an early venue for cricket and several major matches are known to have been played there in the 18th century. It was the original home of the White Conduit Club, forerunner of Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC). The cricket field was adjacent to the former White Conduit House, immediately south of the modern junction between Dewey Street and Barnsbury Road.

The earliest match known to have been played at White Conduit Fields was the controversial encounter on Monday, 1 September 1718 between London Cricket Club and the Rochester Punch Club. This game provoked a legal case when the Rochester players walked off in an attempt to save their stake money, London clearly winning at the time. The case focused on the terms of the wager rather than the rules of the sport and the judge ordered the game to be played out. It was concluded in July 1719 at the same venue and London won by 21 runs. London’s 21-run victory is the earliest known definite result of any cricket match.

The next known match was on Wednesday, 19 August 1719 between London and Kent. Kent won and the co...
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MARCH
8
2017

 

Abbey Mills Pumping Station
Abbey Mills pumping station is a much-​​admired masterpiece of Victorian public works engineering, built in 1865–8 and nicknamed ’the cathedral of sewage’. The Abbey Mill was an ancient tidal watermill in West Ham, dating back to at least the 12th century.

It was sited on Channelsea Island in the Channelsea River and was one of the eight watermills on the River Lea recorded in the Domesday Book. The ’Abbey’ part of the name comes from its ownership by Stratford Langthorne Abbey, a Cistercian monastery founded in 1134 by William de Montfichet. The abbey disappeared during the reign of Henry VIII.

The area nearby the site of the original Abbey Mill is now known as Abbey Mills. There are several pumping stations located there, including the original Abbey Mills Pumping Station.

Abbey Mills Pumping Station was designed by engineer Joseph Bazalgette, Edmund Cooper, and architect Charles Driver. It was built between 1865 and 1868, housing eight beam engines by Rothwell & Co. of Bolton. With two engines on each arm of a cruciform plan, with an elaborate Byzantine style, it was described ...
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MARCH
6
2017

 

Baitul Futuh
Baitul Futuh (the Morden Mosque) is one of Britain’s largest mosques. Completed in 2003, entirely from donations of Ahmadi Muslims in the UK, the mosque covers an area of 21,000 square metres and the full complex can accommodate up to 10,000 worshippers.

It is located next to Morden South railway station, approximately 700 metres from Morden underground station.
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MARCH
4
2017

 

White Conduit Street (1950s)
A line of children hold hands as they walk along the middle of White Conduit Street towards the junction with Chapel Market in Islington in the 1950s. Much of the street was demolished in the late 20th century to make way for Tolpuddle Street and a car park.
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MARCH
2
2017

 

Thrift Farm
Thrift Farm was a farm in Boreham Wood. In 1922 a P. J. Hambrook was farming Thrift Farm.

Thrift Farm was purchased by MGM in the late 1940s when they incorporated it into their backlot. The farm continued to be used but closed in 1970 when the studio closed and was subsequently demolished.
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