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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
October
6
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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JULY
26
2022

 

Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...
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JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


MAY
19
2022

 

Lochnagar Street, E14
Lochnagar Street runs east from the Blackwall Tunnel northern approach road Before the coming of the Blackwall Tunnel, there was a road called Brunswick Road from which Lochnagar Street ran, towards Islay Wharf.

This area of Poplar contains a large number of streets with Scottish names because they were built on an estate which had been bought by the McIntosh family in 1823. The McIntosh Housing Estate was laid out during the 1870s and the road layout was formalised. During the 1880s an oil works was established on the river frontage.

The developer and builder of the housing was John Abbott, who is commemorated in Abbott Road - the longest street in this part of Poplar. The houses in Lochnagar Street had three rooms and a scullery down­stairs.

The initial letters of other street names were chosen alphabetically from Aberfeldy Street to Zetland Street. Other roads in this patch include Ailsa Street, Blair Street, Culloden Street, Dee Street, Ettrick Street, Findhorn Street, Leven Road, Oban Street, Spey Street, Te...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 507 completed street histories and 46993 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

SEPTEMBER
29
2017

 

Chalfont & Latimer
Chalfont and Latimer station is on the Metropolitan line. It is the junction between services to Amersham and Chesham. It is also on the Chiltern Railways line to Aylesbury. The station serves all three of the Chalfonts — Chalfont St Giles, Chalfont St Peter and, the nearest, Little Chalfont.

Little Chalfont is situated in the county of Buckinghamshire, on the edge of the Chiltern Hills and about 50 kilometres from central London.

The Metropolitan Railway reached Little Chalfont in 1889. However the village didn’t really develop until the 1920s when land was released for housing to become part of, as Sir John Betjeman styled it: Metroland. The present population is around 5000. The station is now served by London Transport Metropolitan line and by Chiltern Railways resulting in excellent transport to and from London; Marylebone station can be reached in little over 30 minutes.

The village has a post office and a building society as well as a pharmacy, a small supermarket and ab...
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SEPTEMBER
28
2017

 

Acton Town
Acton Town station was opened as Mill Hill Park on 1 July 1879 by the District Railway (now the District line). It remained as a terminus until on 1 May 1883 and 23 June 1903 the District Railway opened two branches from Acton Town to Hounslow Town and Park Royal & Twyford Abbey respectively.

On 4 July 1932 the Piccadilly line was extended to Acton Town. District line services to both the Hounslow and Uxbridge branches were withdrawn completely on 9 and 10 October 1964 after which operations were provided by the Piccadilly line alone.

The original brick-built station was built in 1879 and in February 1910 the station building was reconstructed.

On 1 March 1910 the station was given its present name.

In 1931 and 1932 the station was rebuilt again in preparation for transferring the Uxbridge branch service from the District line to the Piccadilly line.

The new station was designed by Charles Holden in a modern European geometric style using brick, reinforced concrete and glass.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
27
2017

 

Alba Place, W11
Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area. Originally the stable house accommodation for the main houses on Lancaster Road, the primary purpose of the Mews properties is now residential.

Alba Place is located on the site of an original Mews but has been redeveloped to a degree that it no longer contains any surviving Mews properties. It is a gated cul-de-sac off Portobello Road in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, almost opposite Hayden’s Place (another redeveloped Mews). It contains 16 properties used for residential purposes.

Alba Place was Albion Place until 1937, one of the many patriotic names dating from the period immediately following the Crimean War.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2017

 

St Mary-le-Bow
St Mary-le-Bow is an historic church rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666 by Sir Christopher Wren. According to tradition a true Cockney must be born within earshot of the sound of Bow Bells. Archaeological evidence indicates that a church existed on this site in Saxon times. A medieval version of the church had been destroyed by the London Tornado of 1091, one of the earliest recorded (and one of the most violent) tornadoes in Britain, although the newly completed arched crypt survived.

During the later Norman period the church, known as ’St Mary de Arcubus’, was rebuilt and was famed for its stone arches. At that period the 12 feet 6 inches high vaulted crypt although only accessible from within the church had windows and buttresses visible from the street.

From at least the 13th century, the church was a peculier of the Diocese of Canterbury and the seat of the Court of Arches, to which it gave the name. The ’bow bells’, which could be heard as far away as Hackney Marshes, were once used to order a curfew in the City of London. This building burned in the Great Fire of London of 1666.

The church with its steeple ha...
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SEPTEMBER
22
2017

 

Cromwell Curve
The Cromwell Curve was a short section of railway line between Gloucester Road and High Street Kensington stations. The line was opened by the District Railway (DR) on 5 July 1871. The tracks formed a triangle across the end of the v connecting the District’s existing routes from Earl’s Court station to Gloucester Road and High Street Kensington, and ran in a cutting parallel to the Metropolitan Railway (MR). The name derives from Cromwell Road which is immediately south of the site of the curve.


The track was opened without Parliamentary authority in an attempt by the DR to increase its share of the revenues from the Inner Circle (now the Circle line), which were divided on the basis of mileage of track owned by the DR and the MR. Sir John Fowler arbitrated the dispute, ruling on 27 July that Inner Circle receipts were to be divided 67% to the Metropolitan and 33% to the District (revised to 50:50 in 1878, due to increased traffic from the District’s western lines). Although the Cromwell Curve was used only occasionally, the dispute between the two companies continued ...
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SEPTEMBER
21
2017

 

West Acton
West Acton is a station between Ealing Broadway and North Acton on the Ealing Broadway branch of the Central line. The Great Western Railway built its Ealing Broadway branch and opened it for freight trains in April 1917.

The Central London Railway subsequently abandoned its policy of no through running with any other railway and secured powers to build a short extension from its terminus at Wood Lane to connect with the new Great Western Railway branch.

Central trains used the line from 3 August 1920. West Acton and North Acton were built and owned by the Great Western Railway and both opened on 5 November 1923.

The current station - replacing the original building - was designed by the Great Western Railway on behalf of London Transport as part of the 1935-40 New Works Programme. The design was by the GWR’s architect Brian Lewis and it was completed in 1940. The station is a Grade II listed building.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
17
2017

 

Forty Farm
Forty Farm was situated where the Sudbury to Kingsbury road crossed the Lidding at Forty Bridge. In the 14th or 15th centuries, people, including the Uxendon family from Uxendon Farm, moved south to form another small community at Forty Green.

This settlement was known as Uxendon Forty, Wembley Forty or Preston Forty. The farm at Forty Green was at first called Pargrave's, and later South Forty Farm.

Even as late as the 19th century, the area had not changed significantly. London's growing need for hay meant that Forty Farm had converted to hay farming by 1852 and indeed was noted for its horses. In the 1831 census, Forty Farm housed 10 people

The construction of the Metropolitan Railway in 1880 effectively destroyed Forty Green, although South Forty Farm continued into the 20th century. In 1928 the farm became the headquarters of the Century Sports Ground. The celebrated gunsmiths Holland & Holland had a shooting ground nearby. As Forty Farm Sports Ground the site of the farm remains green to this day.

The Holland & Ho...
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SEPTEMBER
15
2017

 

Cranes Farm
Cranes Farm was a farm in Boreham Wood. Cranes Farm was situated just behind the modern location of the Bull and Tiger pub (a.k.a. The Directors’ Arms).

Cranes Way was laid out nearly on the line of the farm track.

The final tenant farmer of Cranes Farm, as compensation, was given one of the new houses Laings built in Manor Way at a low-rate, long-term fixed rent.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
14
2017

 

Ilchester Place, W14
Ilchester Place runs between Abbotsbury Road and Melbury Road, immediately adjacent to the southern boundary of Holland Park itself. Ilchester Place was built in 1929 as a set of small mansion blocks, designed by the architect L Martin.

It takes its name from Edward Fox-Strangways, the Fifth Earl of Ilchester, who bought the estate from Lady Holland in the late 19th century, and continued the process of development on the estate. (See ’History’).

The street is considered to be ‘prime residential’ and consists of large neo-Georgian 3-storey brick-built family houses. It is wide, tree-lined and very quiet. The houses have attractive small front gardens, often with neatly trimmed hedges and well cut lawns, and sub-basement garages. Some of the houses are attractively covered in creeper.

The road is particularly convenient for all the facilities in nearby Holland Park although the houses also have very decent-sized rear gardens.

Due to the width of the road Ilchester Place has a particular feeling of spaciousness.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
11
2017

 

Apex Corner (1920s)
This view of the Apex Corner roundabout shows the original Apex Garage. The Northway Circus roundabout was built as part of general improvements to the road system in the 1920s.

These improvements, along with the North Circular Road, created the Barnet Bypass (A1) and Watford Bypass (A41) which met at the roundabout.

To serve the traffic which passed, a garage called Apex Garage was built on the roundabout. Such was its distinctiveness that 'Northway Circus' began being called 'Apex Corner'.

In time, Apex Corner took over as the name - it is now semi-official, used by Transport For London as the destination on bus routes.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
10
2017

 

Brentford
Brentford was the historic county town of Middlesex. Brentford's economy has diverse company headquarters buildings which mark the start of the M4 corridor; in transport it also has two railway stations and the Boston Manor tube station on its north-west border with Hanwell.

Brentford at the start of its 21st century attracted regeneration of its little-used warehouse premises and docks including the re-modelling of the waterfront to provide more economically active shops, townhouses and apartments, some of which comprises Brentford Dock.

A 19th and 20th centuries mixed social and private housing locality: New Brentford is contiguous with the Osterley neighbourhood of Isleworth and Syon Park and the Great West Road which has most of the largest business premises.

Brentford station was opened in 1849 by the London and South Western Railway.

Between 1950 and 1980 was named Brentford Central.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
7
2017

 

Chingford Lane, E4
Chingford Lane is a main road skirting Woodford Golf Club. Chingford Lane shows some early Warner Estate development with terraced housing dating from the late 1870s.

St.Andrew’s Church of England opened in 1880 with services held in the Working Men’s hall and then in a room nearby. An iron church was erected in 1888. In 1923 the iron was replaced with cement and the frame had moved north to make room for a hall, and kitchen. The original wooden bell-tower was also removed.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
6
2017

 

Buckingham Palace
Buckingham Palace is the official London residence and principal workplace of the British monarch. Located in the City of Westminster, the palace is a setting for state occasions and royal hospitality. It has been a focus for the British people at times of national rejoicing and crisis.

Originally known as Buckingham House, the building which forms the core of today's palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1705 on a site which had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. It was subsequently acquired by George III in 1761 as a private residence for Queen Charlotte, and known as The Queen's House. During the 19th century it was enlarged, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard.

Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837. The last major structural additions were made in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the East front, which contains the well-known balcony ...
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SEPTEMBER
5
2017

 

Garden Museum
The first museum in the world dedicated to the history of gardening. The Garden Museum is based in the deconsecrated parish church of St Mary-at-Lambeth adjacent to Lambeth Palace. The church originally housed the 15th and 16th century tombs of many members of the Howard family, including now-lost memorial brasses to Thomas Howard, 2nd Duke of Norfolk (died 1524), his wife Agnes Tilney, Duchess of Norfolk (died 1545) and is also the burial place of Queen Anne Boleyn's mother Elizabeth Boleyn, formerly Howard.

St Mary's, which was largely a Victorian reconstruction, was deconsecrated in 1972 and was scheduled to be demolished. In 1976 John and Rosemary Nicholson traced the tomb of the two 17th century royal gardeners and plant hunters John Tradescant father and son to the churchyard, and were inspired to create the Museum of Garden History.

The museum's main gallery is the main body of the church. The collection comprises tools, ephemera and a library. The tool collection includes items purchased at auction and donations f...
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SEPTEMBER
4
2017

 

Abbey Street, SE1
Abbey Street takes its name from Bermondsey Abbey which was situated between Bermondsey Square, Grange Walk and Long Walk. Forerly Great George Street, the street lies on the line of the nave of the abbey church.

The names Abbey Street, Grange Walk and Spa Road give an indication of the earliest defining features of the area. Bermondsey Abbey was demolished shortly after its dissolution in the mid-16th century. The street pattern around it, however, retained key elements of its layout.The eastern gateway in Grange Walk was demolished in 1760 with the road being extended eastwards some years later.

Neckinger Mills. formerly Bevington & Sons Leather Mills. was one of the most famous tanneries in Bermondsey producing light leathers for shoes and fancy goods. The tanning pits were located beside the River Neckinger.

It was said that the fish oil used in the tanning process did wonders for the hair and skin of the (largely female) leather workers.

The mills opened in 1801 and continued production until 1981.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
1
2017

 

Hendon Park
Hendon Park, totalling 12 hectares, between Queens Road (formerly Butchers Lane) and Shire Hall Lane was created by Hendon Urban District Council in 1903. Hendon Park was part of a medieval estate known as the Steps Fields and owned by the Goodyer family. From 1868 till 1903 it was owned by the Kemp family when Hendon Council opened the park to the public.

The park has a Holocaust Memorial Garden, which contains a pond, many plants and is enclosed by large hedges. The Childrens’ Millennium Wood planted in 2000 is a native tree and grassland area. The rest of the park is mainly informal parkland, with mown grass and mature trees, especially London plane and lime. It is a good spot for watching pipistrelle bats on a summer evening.

The landscape includes one of the largest specimens of Acer palmatum in London. Many mature trees survive from the original planting, despite damage caused by the Great Storm of 1987 during which many trees were uprooted and destroyed.

"Rout the Rumour", a large propaganda rally was held in Hendon Park on Sunday, 21 July 1940. The rally included songs, music and sk...
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