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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
FEBRUARY
3
2023

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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AUGUST
21
2022

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
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AUGUST
20
2022

 

Rainham Road, NW10
Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895 The United Land Company bought a 6 acre triangle of land between Harrow Road and the Hampstead Junction railway in 1879, and an adjoining 21 acres from All Souls College in 1882. The whole area was laid out as high-density terraced housing and shops as far east as College Road.

The college leased 13 acres south of the L&NWR railway line to Edward Vigers, who by 1888 had laid out roads and started building 134 small terraced houses.

Rainham Road was let on building leases in 1895 and 30 houses had been built there by 1898.
»read full article


AUGUST
19
2022

 

Eton Avenue, NW3
Eton Avenue runs parallel with Adelaide Road, two blocks north From 1873 onward, William Willett and his son worked together as the chief building team in the area. In the early 1880s, they accepted the challenge of the Eton College estate by constructing Eton Avenue and surrounding roads.

The Willetts then moved on to both Lyndhurst Gardens and Wedderburn Road.

The houses set a precedent for aesthetic architecture in the speculative market. Drawing inspiration from English Queen Anne designs of the late 17th century, they were built with red brick, steep pitched roofs and tall chimneys. Dormers, gables, ornamental glass and ornamentation were other features that set them apart. Every single house was distinct.
»read full article


AUGUST
18
2022

 

Maylands
Maylands was already in existence by 1420 and then called Mellonde Maylands was part of the manor of Dagenhams as early as the 13th century, although it was let out on lease. Two fields beside the Brentwood Road were called Little and Great Dellams and were known in the Middle Ages. Around 1610, Maylands was leased to John Wright of Wright’s Bridge.

In 1919 and at an annual rent of £262, the tenant was a Mr G. Gotheridge who had purchased the farm that same year.

In the 1930s, Mr Hillman ran a civil aerodrome on Maylands Farm and organised aeroplane flights for 5/- per ride. When the Second World War ended, London County Council (LCC) didn’t acquire the farm as it was located outside of their housing estate area.

By the turn of the twenty first century, the old farm buildings had become the headquarters of The Maylands Golf Club.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

Reply

   
Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


Reply
Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

Reply

BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

OCTOBER
31
2017

 

Tyburn
Tyburn was a village of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch and the southern end of Edgware Road. It took its name from the Tyburn Brook, a tributary of the River Westbourne. The name Tyburn, from Teo Bourne meaning ’boundary stream’, is quite widely occurring. The Tyburn consisted of two arms, one of which, crossed Oxford Street, near Stratford Place; while the other - later called the Westbourne - followed nearly the course of the present Westbourne Terrace and the Serpentine. The Westbourne had rows of elms growing on its banks which became a place of execution. The former Elms Lane in Bayswater, preserved the memory of these fatal elms, which can be regarded as the original ’Tyburn Trees.’

Tyburn Brook should not be confused with the better known River Tyburn, which is the next tributary of the River Thames to the east of the Westbourne.

The village was one of two manors of the parish of Marylebone, which was itself named after the stream, St Marylebone being a contraction of St Mary’s church by the bourne. Tyburn was recorded in the Dom...
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OCTOBER
28
2017

 

Montagu House
Montagu House at 22 Portman Square was a historic London house. Occupying a site at the northwest corner of the square, in the angle between Gloucester Place and Upper Berkeley Street, it was built for Mrs Elizabeth Montagu, a wealthy widow and patroness of the arts, to the design of the neoclassicist architect James Stuart.

Construction began in 1777 and the house was completed in 1781, whereupon it became Mrs Montagu’s London residence until her death on 25 August 1800. The house was destroyed by an incendiary bomb in the Blitz of London and the site is now occupied by the Radisson SAS Portman Hotel.
»read full article


OCTOBER
27
2017

 

Half Moon Court, EC1A
Halfmoon Court is the southern most of five passages leading eastward from Kinghorn Street. As once known as Half Moon Passage, its route used to continue round a curious dog-leg bend before emerging through a narrow covered passage into Aldersgate Street, but the path was truncated earlier this century and is now only half its original length. Many of the neighbouring byways, tiny openings dotted here and there, have gone the same way as in other parts of London – sunken from view, forgotten and erased from the scene. There used to be an array of short connecting passages around here, some can still be found but most have either been sealed off or building developments have obliterated their very existence.

Here was the Half Moon Tavern. It stood on the corner of Aldersgate Street, a place favoured in the 16th century by artists, writers, critics, or anyone feeling the need to engage in literary conversation. In 1866 one of these faithful clients wrote in a local paper that the Half Moon ‘is filled with carved woodwork of the most elaborate kind and the w...
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OCTOBER
26
2017

 

Abingdon Villas, W8
Abingdon Villas runs between Earls Court Road and Marloes Road. The eastern section of the street consists of red-brick five-storey mansion blocks and the south side of three-storey white stucco houses.

The western end has a mixture of three-storey houses, some of which are partially stuccoed and others only stuccoed up to first floor level. Most of the houses have off-street parking.

Nos. 80-82 Abingdon Villas was built by Francis Attfield in 1851 as part of his development of houses on the adjoining Earls Court Road.

The sites for Nos. 65-85 (odd) Abingdon Villas backed onto the Cope Place sites and they were built at about the same time in 1852-4. A variety of builders were involved: Nos. 65-67, Edward Good, a carpenter from Kensington; Nos. 69-71, Jackson Frow, a carpenter from Caledonian Road; Nos. 73-75, Thomas Methias, a carpenter; Nos. 77-85, Joseph Liddiatt, a builder from St Marylebone.

In 1851 Barnabas Jennings and William Stevenson, who were involved in other parts of the Abin...
»more


OCTOBER
25
2017

 

St Barnabas’ Church
St Barnabas’ Church is a church in Kensington.




Read the St Barnabas’ Church, Kensington entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


OCTOBER
23
2017

 

Connaught Place, W2
Connaught Place is a street near to Marble Arch. Tyburnia was a name used in the early 19th century for the area - the first part of the Paddington Estate to be built up. It was adopted presumably because ’Tyburn’ was already well known, as a reference to the gallows at Tyburn tree. In the 1870s the name was confined to a fashionable area, bounded on the west by Westbourne and Gloucester terraces, north of Lancaster Gate.

The first building agreement was made in 1807 between the trustees for the beneficial lessees of the Paddington Estate and John Lewis, surgeon, of St. George’s, Hanover Square. Lewis took a lease for 98 years from 1806 of land with a frontage of c. 400 ft. along the Uxbridge road and one of 360 ft. along Edgware Road to the corner of Upper Seymour Street West, a proposed continuation of Marylebone’s Upper Seymour Street. A range of substantial dwellings of the first class facing Hyde Park was to be built by 1812, with second- or third-rate houses along the south side of Upper Seymour’ Stree...
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OCTOBER
22
2017

 

Speakers’ Corner
Speakers’ Corner is in the northeast corner of Hyde Park. Speakers’ Corner is found close to the site of Tyburn gallows, where public hangings took place between 1196 and 1783. Legend has it the origins of Speakers’ Corner lie in the tradition of granting last words to those condemned to die.

Speakers here may talk on any subject, as long as the police consider their speeches lawful. Contrary to popular belief, there is no immunity from the law, nor are any subjects proscribed, but in practice the police tend to be tolerant and therefore intervene only when they receive a complaint. On some occasions in the past, they have intervened on grounds of profanity. Historically there were a number of other areas designated as Speakers’ Corners in other parks in London (e.g., Lincoln’s Inn Fields Finsbury Park, Clapham Common, Kennington Park, and Victoria Park).

Though Hyde Park Speakers’ Corner is considered the paved area closest to Marble Arch, legally the public speaking area extends beyond the Reform T...
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OCTOBER
20
2017

 

Somerset House, Park Lane
Somerset House was an 18th-century town house on the east side of Park Lane, where it meets Oxford Street, in the Mayfair area of London. It was also known as 40 Park Lane, although a renumbering means that the site is now called 140 Park Lane. The house was built between 1769 and 1770 for John Bateman, 2nd Viscount Bateman and was designed by the master carpenter John Phillips, who was the "undertaker" for the whole north-west corner of the Grosvenor estate.

The new house was built with one side facing Park Lane, the main entrance being from a courtyard which continued the line of Hereford Street. It had four storeys above ground, with bay windows extending through the floors. One bay faced Park Lane, and two more faced the garden, which ran down to North Row. Although all surviving pictures of the house show it cased in stucco, at the outset the facades may have been bare brick, with the windows dressed in Portland stone. On the ground floor, the entrance hall was paved in Portland stone and leading from it were the dining room, the drawing room and a dressing room. The staircase rose from the hall, with stone steps and iron railings, to the second floor, which had three principal rooms, including Lady Batem...
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OCTOBER
19
2017

 

South Harrow
South Harrow originally spread south and west from the hamlet of Roxeth as a result of easier access from Central London by rail. The Metropolitan District Railway (which became the District Line but then an independent company) was aware by the 1890s that Uxbridge and Harrow were poorly served. It proposed a line towards both town and formed the Ealing & South Harrow Railway. The line was built to South Harrow (then a rural spot south of Roxeth). The line was built by 1899, but the District was too impoverished to open it until 1903.

South Harrow thus became the terminus of a line from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey (now the Piccadilly Line runs here). Northolt Road became South Harrow’s own high street. The original station building is located approximately 170 metres south of the existing station.

The new extension was the first section of the Underground’s surface lines to be electrified and on 1 March 1910, the line was extended north to meet the Metropolitan Railway tracks at Rayners Lane and services commenced to Uxbridge. North of South Harrow station, the line crosses the ...
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OCTOBER
17
2017

 

Marble Arch
Marble Arch is a 19th-century white marble faced triumphal arch. The structure was designed by John Nash in 1827 to be the state entrance to the cour d’honneur of Buckingham Palace; it stood near the site of what is today the three-bayed, central projection of the palace containing the well known balcony. In 1851 it was relocated and following the widening of Park Lane in the early 1960s is now sited, incongruently isolated, on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane and Edgware Road.

Historically, only members of the Royal Family and the King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery are permitted to pass through the arch; this happens only in ceremonial processions.

Nash’s three arch design is based on that of the Arch of Constantine in Rome and the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in Paris. The triumphal arch is faced with Carrara marble with embellishments of marble extracted from quarries near Seravezza.

John Flaxman was chosen to make the commemorative sculpture. After his death i...
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OCTOBER
15
2017

 

Pepler Mews, SE5
Pepler Mews is a cul-de-sac off of Cobourg Road. Built in the late nineteenth century, it ran behind a now-vanished road known as Pepler Road. At the end of the Mews by 1900, was the Alpha Works, a collar manufacturers. A laundry was the only other building in the road.

In the twentieth century, Pepler Mews became residential.
»read full article


OCTOBER
14
2017

 

Kensington Square, W8
Kensington Square is a garden square in London, W8. It was founded in 1685; hence it is the oldest such square in Kensington. In London, St. James’s Square, Soho Square and Golden Square are a few years older, but in contrast with these Kensington Square still retains its residential character. 1-45 Kensington Square are listed Grade II for their architectural merit.
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OCTOBER
13
2017

 

Theobald Street, SE1
Theobald Street is (now) a short street lying off of the New Kent Road. The street was on the map by 1830, marked as Theobalds Street. It run north to a now-gone street known as George Street.

Its notable architectural feature used to be the St Andrew’s Southwark church which was on the corner of Theobald Street and the New Kent Road, The parish of St Andrew, Newington had been formed from Holy Trinity in 1877.

The church, consisted of a chancel with vestry and organ chamber, a nave with north and south aisles, a tower in the west bay of the south aisle and a shallow porch against the tower. It was built of stock bricks with red brick dressings and slate roofs. It was designed in late 13th-century style.

It was damaged in World War 2 and demolished in 1956. The church hall remained but was demolished c 1980, following a fire.

Theobald Street, Southwark is now largely industrial.
»read full article


OCTOBER
12
2017

 

Four Wents
Four Wents was a green which existed as a cross roads until 1873. Four roads met here originally. Two are still main roads - Whitehall Road and Friday Hill. They were joined by Pimp Hall Lane, now a track going to the recycling centre but then the road from Hale End, and Kings Road.

The road layout changed when the railway was built in 1873.
»read full article


OCTOBER
11
2017

 

Queenhithe, EC4V
Queenhithe is a small and ancient ward of the City of London, situated by the River Thames and a minor street. The name of ‘Queenhithe’ today refers essentially to three concepts: (1) The ancient dock by that name. (2) Just to the north of the dock, a street called Queenhithe. (3) The third use of the word is in the Ward of Queenhithe which, obviously, takes its name from the dock.

Queenhithe was a thriving Saxon and medieval dock and is the only inlet now surviving along the City waterfront today. In Saxon times a second dock was also cut into the river bank at Billingsgate which remained until Victorian times when the dock was filled in and a new building called Billingsgate Market was erected on the reclaimed land.

By the 9th century Vikings were occupying the land inside the Roman Wall. In AD 886 the land inside the Roman Wall was reoccupied by King Alfred the Great. Alfred drove the Danes out of the City and is assumed to have established the street pattern to the south of Cheapside. A few years later, in AD 899, a harbour was established at ‘Ethelred...
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OCTOBER
7
2017

 

Mermaid Tavern
The Mermaid Tavern was a notable tavern during the Elizabethan era. Mermaid Tavern was located in Cheapside, to the east of St. Paul’s Cathedral. It had entrances from both Friday Street and Bread Street. The tavern’s sign, not surprisingly, bore a mermaid.

It was the site of the so-called "Fraternity of Sireniacal Gentlemen", a drinking club that met on the first Friday of every month that included some of the Elizabethan era’s leading literary figures, among them Ben Jonson, John Donne, John Fletcher and Francis Beaumont, Thomas Coryat, John Selden, Robert Bruce Cotton, Richard Carew, Richard Martin, and William Strachey.

A popular tradition has grown up that the group included William Shakespeare, although most scholars think that was improbable.

The tavern, the location of which today corresponds to the corner of Bread and Cannon Streets, burned down in the Great Fire of London.
»read full article


OCTOBER
6
2017

 

Street cricket (1953)
Street cricket has been played across London since the rules of the game were formulated. Montford Place is a street near to the Oval cricket ground in Kennington and children in the area have long been fonder of the game than in other areas of London. This photo was taken in 1953.

In street cricket, there is no real rule book. Tennis balls are often used because it is lighter. A dustbin, empty crates, broom sticks or canes serve as stumps at the batsman's end while a piece of brick or a pipe serves as the stumps at the bowler's end. When they are no stumps, the players assume the stumps to be at an imaginary height (usually above the waist level of the batsman). This leads to many arguments as to whether the ball would have hit the stumps or not had the stumps been there for real.

The size of the road or traffic does not hinder the progress of a game; children often wait for the traffic to clear before playing consecutive deliveries.

A very important rule that is almost always used in street cricket is one pitch catch...
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OCTOBER
4
2017

 

Acton Central
Acton Central railway station is on the North London Line, now part of the London Overground system, between South Acton and Willesden Junction. The station was opened as Acton on 1 August 1853 by the North and South Western Junction Railway (N&SWJR), but was renamed Acton Central on 1 November 1925.

Between 1875 and 1902 it was connected with St Pancras via the Dudding Hill Line, which branches off the North London Line between Acton Central and Willesden Junction. Harlesden (Midland) railway station was the next stop on the line north. The Dudding Hill Line is still open today, but only carries freight.

Acton Central station was named for closure by the 1963 Beeching Report, also known as the Beeching Axe.

The station is where trains change power supply from overhead line equipment (AC) to Third rail (DC), or vice versa, depending on direction of travel.
»read full article


OCTOBER
3
2017

 

Woodsford Square, W14
Woodsford Square is a 1970s development consisting of a series of interconnecting squares hidden away on the eastern side of Addison Road. The buildings are mainly 4-storey town houses, with some of the corner houses having interesting protruding first floor extensions (painted white) on stilts.

There are a series of communal private gardens with lawns and trees and the whole development is rather hidden and private.

At the north end is Holland Park Tennis Club.
»read full article


OCTOBER
2
2017

 

Holland Villas Road, W14
Holland Villas Road is a wide tree-lined avenue which runs between Upper Addison Gardens and the junction of Addison Crescent and Holland Road. It is considered one of the most desirable addresses in Holland Park.

The buildings consist mainly of large brick detached villas – some are absolutely enormous. Most have front gardens with small driveways and high security gates. Some even have their own swimming pools. At the north end is a modern block of flats called Fitzclarence House. There is also Addisland Court, an 8-storey 1930’s-style block of flats.

The houses in Holland Villas Road are large detached houses of two or three storeys with basements. The builder was James Hall who built the houses over several years from 1857. Hall built about 120 houses in the estate in the 1850s. He also built extensively in the Chepstow Villas and Pembridge Place area. They are similar in size to his houses in Addison Road, but of a more modern design. The central portico entrance door is narrower to make room for large canted bay windows on either side. In place of Georgian balustrades topping the faca...
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OCTOBER
1
2017

 

Dallas Road, NW4
Dallas Road is a road running parallel to the Midland railway and M1. By 1906, Sir Audley Dallas Neeld was building on the land that had been Renters Farm, starting with a new road from Station Road to Queens Road, later called Vivian Avenue.

The eventual estate used many names associated with the family: Dallas, Audley, Elliot, Graham, Rundell, Vivian, and Algernon and Neeld.

The M1 was built alongside Dallas Road’s already busy railway setting.
»read full article


OCTOBER
1
2017

 

Edgware Road
Edgware Road station was a station on the world’s first underground railway. The main Edgware Road station now serves the Circle, District and Hammersmith & City lines. It opened a few months later than other stops on the rest of the Metropolitan Railway between Paddington and Farringdon, opening on 1 October 1863.

A second Edgware Road station was opened on 15 June 1907 by the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (BS&WR, now the Bakerloo line) when it extended its line from the temporary northern terminus at Marylebone. In common with other early stations of the lines owned by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, that station was designed by architect Leslie Green with an ox-blood red glazed terracotta façade.
»read full article


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