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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
July
5
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line. High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.
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MARCH
9
2022

 

Addle Street, EC2V
Addle Street, there from ancient times, was a victim of the bulldozer after the Second World War In the 1633 edition of Stow’s Survey it is suggested that the name is derived from King Adelstane, who is said to have had a house with an entrance in Adel Street, and that in evidence the street is called King Adel Street. There do not appear to be any records giving this form of the name. While the Saxon word Atheling means noble, Sheila Fairfield suggests that the word derives from the word for dung.

The church of St Mary Aldermanbury stood on the west side of Aldermanbury, between Love Lane and Addle Street.

General development of the area put paid to the street in the early 1960s.
»read full article


MARCH
8
2022

 

Regents Park Estate, NW1
The Regent’s Park Estate is a large housing estate in the London Borough of Camden In 1951, land was sold by the Crown Estate to the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras after many of the buildings in the area suffered destruction during the Second World War. The Borough then built council housing - some 2000 homes on either side of Robert Street, between Albany Street and Hampstead Road.

Most of the estate is named after places in the Lake District such as Windermere, Cartmel and Rydal Water.

The site of the estate incorporates the sites of Cumberland Market, Munster Square and Clarence Gardens.


»read full article


MARCH
7
2022

 

Trafalgar Avenue, SE15
This area of Peckham, close to the Old Kent Road, was developed from the 1840s onwards In the 1850s, north Peckham was developing as a handsome, middle-class suburb. Leading south from the Old Kent Road, Trafalgar Road (later Trafalgar Avenue) was laid out including an earlier bridge (the Trafalgar Bridge) over the Grand Surrey Canal. The canal was filled in during 1970.

On the corner of Trafalgar Avenue and Waite Street, a pub was built: "The Victory".

After the Second World War and its war damage, much of the southern part of Trafalgar Avenue was demolished to make way for parkland.
»read full article


MARCH
6
2022

 

Galton Street, W10
Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 Because of its townscape and architectural quality and its historical interest, the Queen’s Park Estate was designed as a conservation area in 1978. A number of properties had been sold and many of them had already been "improved" in such an insensitive way that the visual unity of whole terraces was threatened.

The designation enabled the City Council to safeguard the character of the Estate and give guidance to owner-occupiers on suitable improvements. The conservation area was extended in 1991 to include parts of the Grand Union Canal and the Harrow Road Library (part of this extension was transferred to the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 1994).
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Bob Land   
Added: 29 Jun 2022 13:20 GMT   

Map legends
Question, I have been looking at quite a few maps dated 1950 and 1900, and there are many abbreviations on the maps, where can I find the lists to unravel these ?

Regards

Bob Land

Reply
Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

Reply
Comment
Jack Wilson   
Added: 21 Jun 2022 21:40 GMT   

Penfold Printers
I am seeking the location of Penfold Printers Offices in Dt Albans place - probably about 1870 or so

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 19 Jun 2022 16:58 GMT   

Runcorn Place, W11
Runcorn place

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 May 2022 19:03 GMT   

The Three Magpies
Row of houses (centre) was on Heathrow Rd....Ben’s Cafe shack ( foreground ) and the Three Magpies pub (far right) were on the Bath Rd

Reply
Comment
Watts   
Added: 17 May 2022 20:29 GMT   

Baeethoven St School, also an Annex for Paddington College of FE.
In the early 70’s I took a two year science course at Paddington CFE. The science classes were held on weekday evenings at Beethoven Street school, overseen by chemistry teacher, Mr Tattershall.

Reply

   
Added: 25 Apr 2022 22:11 GMT   

Southover, N12
Everyone knows Central Woodside is the place to be. Ever since kdog moved from finchtown, Woodside has been thriving.

Reply
Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

Reply

MARCH
31
2018

 

Finsbury Square, EC2A
Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green. Finsbury Square was developed in 1777 on the site of a previous area of green space to the north of the City of London known as Finsbury Fields, in the parish of St Luke's and near Moorfields. It is sited on the east side of City Road, opposite the east side of Bunhill Fields. Named after it, but several kilometers away, are Finsbury Park and its eponymous neighbourhood.

In 1784, Vincenzo Lunardi achieved the first successful attempt at hot air balloon flight from Finsbury Square.

Past residents of the square include Pascoe Grenfell Hill, Thomas Southwood Smith and Philip Henry Pye-Smith. It has also been the site of the bookshop of James Lackington and the first home of the rabbinical seminary that became the London School of Jewish Studies (1855–81), of the Greek Orthodox church of Saint Sophia and of the Roman Catholic Church of St Mary Moorfields (1820–1900).

From 1907 to 1914, 39 Finsbury Square was the home of the City of London Y...
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MARCH
30
2018

 

Toynbee Hall
Toynbee Hall is a building which is the home of a charity of the same name. It works to bridge the gap between people of all social and financial backgrounds, with a focus on working towards a future without poverty.

It was the first university-affiliated institution of the worldwide Settlement movement; a reformist social agenda that strove to get the rich and poor to live more closely together in an interdependent community.

Founded by Canon Samuel Barnett and his wife Henrietta in 1884 on Commercial Street, it was named in memory of their friend and fellow reformer, Oxford historian Arnold Toynbee, who had died the previous year. Built specifically for the charity as a centre for social reform, it remains just as active today.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2018

 

Tempsford Green
Tempsford Green was created from an area of rough ground in 1951. This park is mainly laid out as football pitches. There is a changing pavilion there.

The site also has a car park.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2018

 

The King’s Field
King George V donated the King's Field site to the National Playing Fields Association in June 1927 for use by local children. The park has two tennis courts, football and cricket pitches, play equipment for children of all ages as well as a café and a skate park.

The cafe was for many years a boarded up, a decaying parks pavilion with changing rooms. This building was transformed into a café during 2008. The Park is well known for its skate park and children’s play area.

The King’s Field’s position next to Bushy Park and surrounded by avenues of trees already means that it has an important value as a corridor for wildlife. The site’s proximity to the river is also significant. With its small patches of bramble and the 17 mature trees on site food and shelter is provided for insects, birds and mammals.
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MARCH
27
2018

 

Temple Bar
Temple Bar is the point in London where Fleet Street, City of London, becomes the Strand, Westminster, and where the City of London traditionally erected a barrier to regulate trade into the city. In the Middle Ages, the authority of the City of London Corporation reached beyond the city’s ancient walls in several places (the Liberties of London). To regulate trade into the city, barriers were erected on the major roads wherever the true boundary was a substantial distance from the old gatehouse. Temple Bar was the most famous of these, since traffic between London (England’s prime commercial centre) and Westminster (the political centre) passed through it. Its name comes from the Temple Church, which has given its name to a wider area south of Fleet Street, the Temple, once belonging to the Knights Templar but now home to two of the legal profession’s Inns of Court.

Commissioned by King Charles II, and designed by Sir Christopher Wren, the fine arch of Portland stone was constructed between 1669 and 1672. Rusticated, it is a two-storey structure consisting of one wide central arch for the road traffic, flanked on both sides by narrower arches f...
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MARCH
26
2018

 

Old and New London: Temple Bar
Temple Bar was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1670–72. [[3212|Temple Bar]] was rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren, in 1670–72, soon after the Great Fire had swept away eighty-nine London churches, four out of the seven City gates, 460 streets, and 13,200 houses, and had destroyed fifteen of the twenty-six wards, and laid waste 436 acres of buildings, from the Tower eastward to the Inner Temple westward.

The old black gateway, once the dreaded Golgotha of English traitors, separates, it should be remembered, the Strand from Fleet Street, the city from the shire, and the Freedom of the City of London from the Liberty of the City of Westminster. As Hatton (1708—Queen Anne) says,—”This gate opens not immediately into the City itself, but into the Liberty or Freedom thereof.” We need hardly say that nothing can be more erroneous than the ordinary London supposition that Temple Bar ever formed part of the City fortifications. Mr. Gilbert à Beckett, laughing at this tradition, once said in Punch: “Temple Bar has always s...
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MARCH
23
2018

 

Lisle’s Tennis Court
Lisle’s Tennis Court was a building off Portugal Street in Lincoln’s Inn Fields in London. Originally built as a real tennis court, it was used as a playhouse during two periods, 1661–1674 and 1695–1705. During the early period, the theatre was called Lincoln’s Inn Fields Playhouse, also known as The Duke’s Playhouse, The New Theatre or The Opera. The building was demolished and replaced by a purpose-built theatre for a third period, 1714–1728.

The tennis court theatre was the first public playhouse in London to feature the moveable scenery that would become a standard feature of Restoration theatres.
»read full article


MARCH
22
2018

 

Regent’s Park
Regent’s Park - not the park itself but the tube station. Regent’s Park tube station is a London Underground station near to Regent’s Park, located on Marylebone Road between the two arms of Park Crescent.

The station was opened on 10 March 1906 by the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR); In the original parliamentary authority for the construction of the BS&WR no station was allowed at Regent’s Park. Permission was granted to add it to the already partially constructed line in 1904.

Because of this same rule and unlike most of the BS&WR’s other stations, Regent’s Park has no surface buildings and is accessed from a subway.

The station is served by lifts - there is also a staircase which can be used and which has 96 steps.

Great Portland Street station is within easy walking distance for interchanges to the Circle and Metropolitan lines.
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MARCH
19
2018

 

Hillside Avenue, WD6
Hillside Avenue was a pre-war road laid out from 1937 onwards. Hillside Avenue follows the contours of high ground running parallel to Shenley Road/Elstree Way.

It was the site of one of the major Boreham Wood schools, Hillside School, which first opened in 1939.
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MARCH
18
2018

 

Hillside School
Hillside School existed between 1939 and 2000. Hillside School was officially opened for just one day in October 1939, due to the outbreak of World War 2. The intake of pupils was postponed until November of that year.

It was the first secondary school to open in Boreham Wood and during the Second World War was the only school in the village. The school continued education throughout the war, pupils having regular air raid drill.

Dennis Gernat was headmaster until the late 1950s and then Mr O’Keefe until the school was sold (to become Yavneh College, opened in 2006).


»read full article


MARCH
17
2018

 

Foster House
Foster House and Brent Lodge were two 18th-century brick houses at the corner of Butcher's Lane and Brent Street. Butcher's Lane later became Queen’s Road Foster House became a Christian Science reading room in 1930. Brent Lodge, enlarged in the early 19th century and renamed St. Peter’s Ouvroir, was demolished in 1957.
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MARCH
16
2018

 

Beaumont Arms
The former Beaumont Arms at 170 Uxbridge Road has been known by later names such as "Edwards" and "The Defectors Weld". The present building dates from 1884/5 but there has been a public house on this site from at least 1826.

The former name probably relates to John Thomas Barber Beaumont, a builder, or his family who owned land in the area from 1811.
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MARCH
15
2018

 

Neagle Close, WD6
Neagle Close is named after Dame Anna Neagle (1904–1986), born Florence Marjorie Robertson, a popular English stage and film actress. Neagle was a successful box-office draw in the British cinema for 20 years and was voted the most popular star in Britain in 1949. She was known for providing glamour and sophistication to war-torn London audiences with her lightweight musicals, comedies and historical dramas. Almost all of her films were produced and directed by Herbert Wilcox, whom she married in 1943.

In the 1930s and 1940s Deacons Hill was a wealthy area of Elstree and many people associated with the film industry lived there. The most famous of these was the prolific film producer Herbert Wilcox and the actress Anna Neagle. They formed a personal and professional relationship in the early 30’s and helped to make Borehamwood the British Hollywood.

They lived in a house at the top of Deacons Hill Road called Hilltop, and from there in 1936 they watched as The British & Dominions Imperial Studios that Wilcox had built in 1929, went up in flames - it was never rebuilt. Anna was marrie...
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MARCH
14
2018

 

Hampstead
Hampstead though now considered an integral part of London, has retained much of its village charm. Hampstead is on a steep hill and the tube station platforms are the deepest on the London Underground network, at 58.5 metres below ground level. It has the deepest lift shaft on the Underground.

Although early records of Hampstead itself can be found in a grant by King Ethelred the Unready to the monastery of St. Peter's at Westminster (AD 986) and it is referred to in the Domesday Book (1086), the history of Hampstead is generally traced back to the 17th century.

Trustees of the Well started advertising the medicinal qualities of the chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) in 1700. Although Hampstead Wells was initially successful, its popularity declined in the 1800s due to competition with other London spas. The spa was demolished in 1882, although a water fountain was left behind.

Hampstead started to expand following the opening of the North London Railway in the 1860s (now on the London Overground), and expanded further after the tube station opened in 1907.
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MARCH
13
2018

 

St Mark Street, E1
St Mark Street was built on the old Goodman’s Fields. A House of Minoresses (from where the street name Minories derives) was established in Aldgate in 1293, by Edward I’s brother Edmund, Duke of Lancaster and his French wife Blanche of Navarre. The King granted them freedom from taxation and tithes. After Edmund died in 1296, many significant medieval figures, particularly women, were buried within the convent walls, including in 1360 Elizabeth de Burgh, Countess of Clare and founder of Clare College Cambridge in 1360, and Anne Mowbray, Duchess of York and wife of the younger prince murdered in the Tower in 1481. The House continued to attract the widows and daughters of the wealthy, and gradually increased its holdings of land, rents and tenements.

After the Dissolution, the nunnery was surrendered to Henry VIII by the last abbess, Dame Elizabeth Salvage, in 1539, who was subsequently granted a pension of £40, and the nunnery became the residence of John Clark, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Henry VIII’s ambassador to th...
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MARCH
12
2018

 

Goodman’s Fields Theatre
Two 18th century theatres bearing the name Goodman’s Fields Theatre were located on Alie Street, Whitechapel. The first opened on 31 October 1727 in a small shop by Thomas Odell, ’Deputy Licenser of Plays’. The first play performed was George Farquhar’s The Recruiting Officer. Henry Fielding’s second play The Temple Beau premièred here 26 January 1730. Upon retirement, Odell passed the management on to Henry Giffard, after a sermon was preached against the theatre at St Botolph’s, Aldgate. Giffard operated the theatre until 1732. After he left, the theatre was used for a variety of acrobatic performances.

Giffard constructed a new theatre down the street designed by Edward Shepherd who also designed the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. The theatre opened with Henry IV, Part I, 2 October 1732 that included actors Thomas Walker, Richard Yates and Harry Woodward. A dispute at the Drury Lane Theatre bought the actress Sarah Thurmond and her husband to the theatre. With the passing of the Licensing Act of 1737, the theatre was forced to close. Giffard rented Linc...
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MARCH
11
2018

 

Dowgate Hill, EC4R
Dowgate Hill is a continuation of Walbrook along the west side of Cannon Street Station, leading to Dowgate Dock. In records from 1150 and 1312 the name appears as Douegate. Also named Downgate by Stow “from its steep descent to the River.”

The supposed antiquity of Dowgate as the Dwr-gate or water gate to Watling Street of the Britons (Welsh Dwr = water gate) is somewhat doubtful as there is no evidence that this place existed previous to the Roman occupation.

In Wren’s Parentalia it is stated that the Romans had a gate in the wall next the Thames and this gate was called Dew-gate or anciently Dour-gate which signified the water gate into the City. The Walbrook joined the Thames at this Dock. Here was the water gate where the ferry from Surrey landed the travellers for the City.

Dowgate was the old port of the Normans and was utilized by the citizens of Rouen. Earlier anchorage for ships belonging to the merchants of the Hansa Steel Yard. In Dowgate Hill are three City Company’s Halls.
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MARCH
9
2018

 

Amersham Workhouse
The Amersham Workhouse was situated on the site of Amersham Hospital. The Union Workhouse was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott who also designed the Albert Memorial in Hyde Park and St Pancras Station in London. It was built in 1838 and served a number of local parishes and provided basic care of the elderly and those unable to work.

It was built following the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834 which obliged parishes to form a "union" to build a workhouse. The Amersham Union included the parishes of Chesham, Beaconsfield, the Chalfonts and Penn. Typically, a Union Workhouse was built in the largest town of the Union. In Amersham’s case this should have been Chesham, but Amersham was chosen.

The Union Workhouse replaced the many work houses around the parishes, with the "inmates" being moved from their local towns, sometimes leaving them for the first time in their lives. Owing to the location of the "union" Workhouse, Whielden Street was for a time known as Union Street. The name reverted to Whielden Street (named after...
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MARCH
8
2018

 

Park Grove, DA7
Park Grove is part of the Martens Grove Estate, build in the 1930s. The Martens Grove Estate was built by Aylings, but many other builders firms were active nearby, including Ellingham, H. Owen and New Ideal Homesteads.

The Estate was built on what had been ancient woodlands, part of the grounds of Martens Grove, a very large house of the 1850s.
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MARCH
7
2018

 

South Kenton
South Kenton is an area of the London Borough of Harrow which is served by South Kenton station. South Kenton is situated on the southern fringe of Northwick Park in an area which was previously open farmland with virtually no settlement.

Its station opened on 3 July 1933 with access from both sides of the railway via a footbridge to the single island platform serving. The further growth of South Kenton was stimulated by the arrival of the railway.

South Kenton’s station footbridge was later replaced by a pedestrian tunnel, cutting out a long climb for passengers entering the station. The station was designed by the architect William Henry Hamlyn and built in concrete and glass.
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MARCH
6
2018

 

Moor Park
Moor Park takes its name from a country house which was originally built in 1678–9 for James, Duke of Monmouth, and was reconstructed in the Palladian style circa 1720 by Giacomo Leoni. The house was built on what used to be an area of Ruislip Moor, which is where the name Moor Park originates. The house and grounds are now occupied by Moor Park Golf Club.

The Moor Park Estate was built after Moor Park and Sandy Lodge station was opened on 9 May 1910 after, in September 1887, the Metropolitan Railway’s extension opened from the previous terminus at Pinner, en route to Rickmansworth.
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MARCH
4
2018

 

Figges Marsh
Figges Marsh is a park in Mitcham. Figges Marsh is just over 10 hectares in size and its open space has an outdoor gym and outdoor table tennis.

It was named after William Figge who occupied the land from 1357. Present-day Carlingford Gardens and Manship Road mark the boundary between Figge’s property and that of the medieval Biggin Farm estate.

As part of Mitcham Common, Figges Marsh was used for grazing until 1923 when the urban district council assumed control. Most of the land was left as meadow until mechanical mowing became possible in the 1940s. Around this time, the surrounding area began to be built up with housing, much of which was erected by the council.
»read full article


MARCH
3
2018

 

George Court, WC2N
George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham. Villers acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets.

»read full article


MARCH
2
2018

 

Devonshire Hill Lane, N17
Devonshire Hill Lane was laid out along the line of a former farm track. Much of the modern road pattern of Tottenham had been established by 1619. High Road ran northward in the east and Green Lanes, dividing at the later junction of Wood Green High Road and Bounds Green Road, in the west; between them routes corresponding to the later White Hart and Lordship lanes and West Green and St. Ann’s roads crossed the middle of the parish.

The western part of White Hart Lane was then called Apeland Street as far as the parsonage house, whence a lane later marked by the modern Devonshire Hill Lane led to the Edmonton border at Clay Hill.

Up to the 1920s, the area north of White Hart Lane from the site of Rectory Farm was a landscape of fields with few houses. Devonshire Hill Lane wound its narrow, tree-lined way northwards for half a mile from White Hart Lane, terminating at Devonshire Hill Farm.

After WW1, Local Authorities, under Government direction and subsidy, embarked on a programme of Public Housing developme...
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MARCH
1
2018

 

Brownlow Road, WD6
Brownlow Road was built together with Drayton Road. Drayton Road was laid out to run parallel to Furzehill Road from a junction with Shenley Road. To enable traffic to traverse Drayton Road, a second street - Brownlow Road was built to connect the southern end with Furzehill Road.

In 1896, Charles Braithwaite who owned the Boreham Wood Engine Works and Loco Packing Company in Drayton Road, built houses for employees in Furzehill Road and Brownlow Road.
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