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Featured · Greenwich ·
MAY
8
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Greenwich
Greenwich is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames. Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was demolished to be replaced by the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained a military education establishment until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle es...

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APRIL
17
2021

 

West Smithfield, EC1A
West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area Smithfield and its market was founded in 1137. The ancient parish of St Sepulchre extended north to Turnmill Street, to St Paul’s Cathedral and Ludgate Hill in the south, and along the east bank of the Fleet (now the route of Farringdon Street). St Sepulchre’s Tower contains the twelve ’bells of Old Bailey’, referred to in the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". Traditionally, the Great Bell was rung to announce the execution of a prisoner at Newgate.

A livestock market was in the area as early as the 10th century.

As a large open space close to the City, Smithfield was a popular place for public gatherings. In 1374 Edward III held a seven-day tournament at Smithfield. Possibly the most famous medieval tournament at Smithfield was that commanded in 1390 by Richard II.

The Priory of St Bartholomew had long treated the sick. After the Reformation it was left with neither income nor monastic occupants but, following a petition by the C...
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APRIL
16
2021

 

Old Ford Road, E3
Old Ford Road stretches two and a quarter miles from Bethnal Green to Bow Old Ford Road represents two separate ways from different points to the sometime passage across the Lee, one being from the west, the other from the south, which in meeting converged with a third from the north which is known now as Wick Lane, the communication with Hackney.

In ancient times the estuary of the river Lee extended as far as Hackney Wick, and during the period when the Romans were in Britain the marshes which lay above it and on either side were crossed in the direction of Leyton by a stone causeway of which portions have been found, but of any contemporary road leading to it no traces have been discovered, although Roman remains were unearthed in 1868 in the coal and goods yard attached to Old Ford Station. The probability is that there was no military highway of massive construction such as those found elsewhere, but a track formed by use which led through woods and over the open fields to the first fordable place on the river Lee or Lea, a name derived ...
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APRIL
15
2021

 

Crossharbour
Crossharbour is a station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) Bank-Lewisham Line in Cubitt Town The station opened as ’Crossharbour’ on 31 August 1987 but was renamed in 1994 to ’Crossharbour and London Arena’. After the neighbouring London Arena was demolished in 2006, the original name was reinstated. Just to the north of the current station, the London and Blackwall Railway built Millwall Docks station. This operated between 1871 and 1926.

The ’cross harbour’ name refers to the nearby Glengall Bridge across Millwall Inner Dock. The bridge’s construction was a neccessity for the developers to obtain planning approval for the dock when it was built in 1868.

In 1969 Tower Hamlets council completed the St John’s estate on the Cubitt Town side of the station. The project was begun 17 years earlier by Poplar Borough Council.
»read full article


APRIL
14
2021

 

Narrow Street, E14
Narrow Street is a road running parallel to the River Thames through the Limehouse area Many archaeologists believe that Narrow Street represents the line of the medieval river wall. This wall was built to reclaim riverside marshland and to protect it from the tides.

A combination of tides and currents made this point on the Thames a natural landfall for ships. The first wharf was complete in 1348. Lime kilns or oasts (’lymehostes’) used in the production of mortar and pottery were built here in the fourteenth century.

Houses were then built, on the wall itself at first, but then outwards onto the foreshore by a process of encroachment. Indeed, the eastern end of Narrow Street was previously known as Fore Street.

The area grew rapidly in Elizabethan times as a centre for world trade. The neighbourhood supplied ships with ropes and other necessities; pottery was also made here for the ships. Ship chandlers settled here building wooden houses and wharves in the cramped space between street and river.

By the t...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply

   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

Reply
Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

Reply

Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
DECEMBER
31
2018

 

Carlton Gardens, SW1Y
Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832. The cul-de-sac, named after the demolished Carlton House, contains seven large houses.

Lord Kitchener once lived at Number 2 and Number 4 was home to Lord Palmerston for a time and later served as Charles de Gaulle’s government in exile, Free France.

Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary, resided on 2 Carlton Gardens from October 2016 to July 2018.

»read full article


DECEMBER
30
2018

 

Burlington Gardens, W1J
Burlington Gardens, with houses dating from 1725, was laid out on land that was once part of the Burlington Estate. Burlington Gardens was once part of Vigo Lane (or Vigo Street). The section behind Burlington House was renamed Burlington Gardens by 1831. Prior to that, it was part of Glasshouse Street.

The street joins Old Bond Street and New Bond Street in the west and Vigo Street in the east.

On the south side of Burlington Gardens is one end of the Burlington Arcade.
»read full article


DECEMBER
29
2018

 

St George’s Square, SW1V
St Georges Square is a long narrow space reaching to the river with an enclosed garden in the centre. At the eastern end is St. George’s Square (1850), a long narrow space reaching to the river with an enclosed garden in the centre. The houses are large. At No. 9 Sir J. Barnby d. 1896.

At the north end is St Saviour’s Church, built in 1864 from designs by Cundy in a Decorated Gothic style.
»read full article


DECEMBER
28
2018

 

Passmore Street, SW1W
Passmore Street, formerly Union Street, contains a social mix. Passmore Street contains both expensive modern private homes, cheek by jowl with social housing which is still owned and managed by the Grosvenor Estate.

Lumley Flats, built in 1875, was built by philanthropists to house the poor in the 19th century.
»read full article


DECEMBER
27
2018

 

Old Barrack Yard, SW1X
Old Barrack Yard is a narrow street of terraced cottages. It was originally the entrance to a cow pasture until a barracks for a regiment of Foot Guards was built in 1758.

In 1826 the area was leased by corn merchant Thomas Phillips who in 1830 built a maze of narrow streets, cottages and stables.
»read full article


DECEMBER
26
2018

 

St Thomas Street, SE1
St Thomas Street is an extremely old thoroughfare. St Thomas’s Hospital was sited here from about 1215 until 1862 when it was moved for the construction of London Bridge Station. The church here houses the Old Operating Theatre (used 1821-62) in the attic floor.

Within a courtyard is the chapel of Guy’s Hospital and a statue of its founder Thomas Guy.

The road now runs along one of the newest London landmarks - The Shard.
»read full article


DECEMBER
25
2018

 

Charville Lane, UB4
Charville Lane is an ancient lane of Hayes running east-west. Originally the road connected Pole Hill Road and went as far as West End Road. Since through traffic cannot travel the whole route, the detached section at the eastern end takes an alternative spelling: Sharvel Lane.

While the area between Woodrow Avenue, Kingshill Avenue, and Charville Lane was built up in the late 1930s, Charville Lane is remarkably rural considering its location, with farmland bordering it along much of its length. The soil, described in 1876 as ’clay, loam, and gravel’ is watered by a stream which crosses the road, the Yeading Brook, and which forms part of the eastern boundary of Hayes.


»read full article


DECEMBER
24
2018

 

Catherine Street, WC2B
Catherine Street runs from Russell Street in the north to Aldwych in the south. Catherine Street was originally laid out in the 1630s by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford. When built it was closed at its southern end near its junction with Exeter Street. The southern end was the garden wall of Exeter House and the back of the White Hart Inn in the Strand.

Until the nineteenth century it was called Brydges Street after the fourth earl’s wife.

The street is now part of the theatre district of London’s West End and includes the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, the Duchess Theatre and the Novello Theatre.

The public houses in the street include Nell of Old Drury and the Opera Tavern. The Opera Tavern was built in 1879 to a design by the architect George Treacher.
»read full article


DECEMBER
23
2018

 

Brompton Road, SW1X
Brompton Road lies partly in Westminster and partly in Kensington and Chelsea. As an official name, Brompton Road did not exist until 1863. Until 1935 Brompton Road extended only as far as the junction with Thurloe Place, after which Fulham Road began.

There was always a lot of traffic on this old road, which linked London with parts of Surrey. From 1726 to 1826 the road was maintained by the Kensington Turnpike Trustees and was a turnpike.

Before this, the Kensington parish boundary enclosed a thin corridor encompassing Brompton Road up to Knightsbridge Green on the north, and up to the lane later to become Sloane Street on the south.

Until the 1760s, little development had occurred on the road with the land around being horticultural with nurseries.

Development commenced in 1763 in several places along both sides of the eastern part of Brompton Road, as far as Yeoman’s Row on the south and Brompton Square on the north, during the 1763-4 London building boom in London.

The street bec...
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DECEMBER
22
2018

 

Oliphant Street, W10
Oliphant Street was the final alphabetical street on the original Queen’s Park Estate naming scheme. The Manor and Parish of Chelsea owned an enclave - covering Kensal Town and Queen’s Park - until 1901 when it was divided between Kensington and Paddington. Kensal Town went to the former and the other side of the Harrow Road to the latter.

The north section was developed in 1875 by the Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company, who were the landlords until 1964. The north-south streets of their grid were numbered 1-6 and euphemistically entitled ’avenues’ : First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Avenues. The remaining streets were simply labelled A Street through to O Street.

Eight years later it was decided that even artisans and labourers deserved a little better. A became Alperton, after the Company’s brickyard in Middlesex, and was followed by Barfett, Caird, Droop (after H R. Droop, Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company Director 1877-1883), Enbrook, Farrant (Sir Richard Farrant, Director 1877-1906), Ga...
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DECEMBER
21
2018

 

Wilton Place, SW1X
Wilton Place was built in 1825 to connect Belgravia with Knightsbridge. Wilton Place stands on the site of a cow yard, and is a broad street with fine houses on the east side. Here is St. Paul’s Church, celebrated for the ritualistic tendencies of its successive vicars. The building by Cundy is handsome, in Early Perpendicular style, and has sittings for 1,800. It was enlarged and altered in 1889 and 1892, when a side-chapel, by Blomfield, was added. Adjoining is the Vicarage, and opposite are St. Paul’s National Schools.

Wilton Place is the location of The Berkeley, a five star hotel. Also St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge can be found there. The church was built in 1843 by subscription and sited on the drill ground of the former barracks. It cost £11,000 with the site being donated by the Marquis of Westminster.

Both Lillie Langtry and botanist, William Bentham have lived in the street.

The Berkeley stands on the site of what was Esmeralda’s Barn. This was a nightclub given to Reggie Kray by the slum landlord Peter Rachman.
»read full article


DECEMBER
19
2018

 

Warren Street, W1T
Warren Street was named after Anne Warren (1737–1807), the wife of Charles FitzRoy, landowner. Charles FitzRoy was 1st Baron Southampton and was the local land owner, responsible for the development of the area. His grandfather had built the New Road (Euston Road).

Late in the eighteenth century, the Euston Road had started to urbanise and a parallel track to its south had been established which provide access to the rear of the new houses.

During 1791, FitzRoy went to work building Warren Street, along the line of the rough track. A variety of builders were employed in the development leading to different styles, though generally the houses are three-storey terraces.

Warren Street was named after his wife, Anne Warren. Her father had founded New York’s Greenwich Village and there are other Warren Streets in North America as a result.

Warren Street became popular place at first with artists and engravers. After the First World War, the motor trade made Warren Street (and Great Portland Street) their home for the next...
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DECEMBER
18
2018

 

Hamilton Place, W1J
Hamilton Place lies just to the north of Hyde Park Corner. Hamilton Place - initially Hamilton Street - came into being at the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in the person of Charles II.

Charles granted James Hamilton, a ranger of Hyde Park and later groom of the bedchamber, a corner of land which had been excluded from Hyde Park when it was walled. A street bearing Hamilton’s name (which eventually became Hamilton Place) was constructed from Piccadilly to the park wall but the houses on it were small with none of the elegance which later came to be associated with the area.

Towards the end of the 18th century, by which time Hamilton’s lease had been acquired by others, the houses in Hamilton Street were said to be “in a ruinous condition and intended to be removed.” They were replaced by a row of houses with a view over the park. Plans were then produced to build three new houses on Piccadilly to make a symmetrical group. Those surviving (141–144 Piccadilly) were demolished in the early 1970s, at t...
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DECEMBER
17
2018

 

Northern Outfall Sewer
The Northern Outfall Sewer (NOS) is a major gravity sewer which runs from Wick Lane in Hackney to Beckton sewage treatment works. Most of the system was designed by Joseph Bazalgette after an outbreak of cholera in 1853 and the "Great Stink" of 1858.

Prior to this work, central London’s drains were built primarily to cope with rain water, and the growing use of flush toilets frequently meant that they became overloaded, flushing sewage and industrial effluent into the River Thames.

Bazalgette’s London sewerage system project included the construction of intercepting sewers north and south of the Thames; the Southern Outfall Sewer network diverts flows away from the Thames south of the river.

In total five interceptor sewers were constructed north of the Thames; three were built by Bazalgette, two were added 30 years later:

The northernmost (High Level Sewer) begins on Hampstead Hill and is routed past Kentish Town and Stoke Newington and under Victoria Park to the start of the Northern Outfall Sewer at Wick Lane. Two middle level sewers ser...
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DECEMBER
17
2018

 

Hatch End
Hatch End is an area in the London Borough of Harrow to the south of the Hertfordshire border. Hatch End is an affluent area with many residents commuting into London. The tree-lined streets, parks, woodlands and golf courses make it a desirable place to live. Coupled with its low crime rate the suburb is popular with families and retirees who chose to remain in the area when downsizing. Regional shopping centres of Harrow and Watford are close by.

Hatch End is home to Harrow Arts Centre, a complex which centres on the 404 seat Elliott Hall and a 120-seat studio theatre.

The area also features several sports facilities, including Hatch End Swimming Pool, Hatch End Cricket Club and Hatch End Tennis Club. The Bannister Stadium & Bannister Sports Centre are located off the Uxbridge Road.

Its railway station dates from 1844.
»read full article


DECEMBER
16
2018

 

Chancery Lane, WC2A
Chancery Lane has formed the western boundary of the City of London since 1994, having previously been divided between the London boroughs of Westminster and Camden. Chancery Lane originates from before 1161 as a ’new lane’. It was created by the Knights Templar from the ’Old Temple’ on the site of the Southampton Buildings on Holborn, in order to access their newly acquired property (the present Temple).

The street takes its name from the historic High Court of Chancery established in 1161 when Robert de Chesney, Bishop of Lincoln, acquired the ’old Temple’.

On the eastern side was the original site of the Domus Conversorum (House of the Converts), a residence and chapel for Jews who had converted to Christianity, founded by King Henry III in the 13th century.

The site later became the Public Record Office designed by Sir James Pennethorne in 1851. In the latter half of the 20th century, records relocated to Kew. In 2001 it underwent renovation and became the Maughan Library.

Lincoln’s Inn occupies most of the western side of Chancery Lane north of Carey Street.

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DECEMBER
12
2018

 

Beeston Place, SW1W
Beeston Place was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate and the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire. The first name of the street was Ranelagh Street which itself was renamed as Ebury Street before the northern part began to go under the separate name of Beeston Place.

The oldest roads in the area were what are now Lower Grosvenor Place, Hobart Place, Ebury Street, Beeston Place and Buckingham Palace Road, all of which were established by the mid 18th century, and may be before this. The Rocque map shows a path where Beeston Place would run.

The 1792 Horwood map delineates the line of King’s Row (Buckingham Palace Road). It also shows that Ranelagh Street had been developed, and this street provides the axis by which today’s Grosvenor Gardens were formed. Ranelagh Street, Arabella Row, Belgrave Place and Eaton Street surrounded a block, which was subdivided by Eaton Lane North. Towards the end of the 18th century, the distinctive triangular shape of the northern block of Grosvenor Gardens was emerging.

Thomas Cundy was both the archi...
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DECEMBER
10
2018

 

Mavelstone Road, BR1
Mavelstone Road dates from early in the Edwardian period. Mavelstone Road is an unadopted road - the London Borough of Bromley is not responsible for the road’s maintenance. As a result, Mavelstone Road has retained an high proportion of its original large early 20th century residences. Its character has led it to be designated a Conservation Area by the borough.

’Stotfold’, built in 1908-9, is a grade II listed building and is also on the statutory list of buildings of architectural or historic interest.

Both Mavelstone Close and Mount Close were developed in the middle 1950s off of Mavelstone Road. Park Farm Road, which adjoins Mavelstone Road, is also unadopted and also has some fine examples of Arts and Crafts residential architecture.
»read full article


DECEMBER
9
2018

 

Goodman’s Fields
Goodman’s Fields was a farm beyond the walls of the City. A House of Minoresses - the Abbey of St Clare was established in Aldgate in 1293. The convent ran a farm in the area and the the first recorded tenant was a Mr Trollope, who sold it to Roland Goodman, a wealthy London fishmonger and farmer.

After the Dissolution, the farm became known as Goodman’s Fields. It kept some 30 to 40 head of cattle and was still flourishing in 1601 when the historian John Stowe visited.

An heir of the original Goodman let the field to a variety of small tenants, first as grazing for horses, then for garden-plots and smallholdings, and is said to have lived ‘like a gentleman’ on the proceeds. By 1678, the land was beginning to to be sold off for the construction of housing.

The open ground was bought by Sir John Leman, Lord Mayor of London. His great-nephew William Leman laid out four streets, named after relatives - Mansell Street, Prescot Street, Ayliff Street (Alie Street) and Leman Street. John Strype in...
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DECEMBER
8
2018

 

Goodman’s Yard, E1
Goodman’s Yard is a street between Minories and Mansell Street. There was a glasshouse here before 1641, owned by Sir Bevis Thelwell. This bottles, white and green glasses. In 1661 it provided glassware for the newly-founded Royal Society.

The glasshouse became Jesse Russell’s soap and tallow factory.

There was an early Baptist chapel in Goodman’s Yard, noted in 1682.

In 1710 a ’loyal society’ (a precursor of modern day insurance companies) based at the "Red-Lyon near Goodman’s Yard" published proposals for insurance on the birth of children, and on marriage.

Pigot’s 1824 Metropolitan Guide states that there was an ’Irish Free School’ in Goodman’s Yard, and a report a few years later states that the East London Irish School had 140 male and 120 female pupils, and was partly supported by subscriptions and partly by payments from the children.

Railway viaducts completely changed the scene. A lattice bridge over Prescott Street and Goodman’s Yard, carried ...
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DECEMBER
8
2018

 

Heathrow Airside Road Tunnel
The Heathrow Airside Road Tunnel (ART) is a tunnel at London Heathrow Airport. It connects the airside roads around Terminals 2 and 3 to those around Terminal 5. The tunnel was opened to traffic in March 2005 and is used only by vehicles with security clearance to drive airside. It is 1.42 kilometres long.

The ART was designed and built between 1999 and 2004 by a team of engineers from BAA (now Heathrow Airport Holdings, the tunnel’s owner), AMEC, Laing O’Rourke, Morgan-Vinci JV and Mott MacDonald.
»read full article


DECEMBER
7
2018

 

Leman Street, E1
Leman Street was named after Sir John Leman. The street was once officially called Red Lion Street but Leman Street was in use concurrently and pronounced like ’lemon’ locally. ’Leman’ was an old term for a mistress or lover. In 1831 the Garrick Theatre but was demolished in 1891 and the police station rebuilt on the site. There was a local German community which supported a ’Christian Home for German Artisans’ (later a German YMCA) and also a private German hotel.

The Eastern Dispensary was set up in Great Alie Street in 1782 by a group of doctors. This moved to new premises in Leman Street in 1858 but closed its doors finally in 1940.

In 1887 the Co-operative Wholesale Society opened the headquarters of its London operations on the corner of Leman Street and Hooper Street. This was a seven-storey structure in brick, granite and Portland stone incorporating a sugar warehouse and a prominent clock tower.


»read full article


DECEMBER
6
2018

 

Prescot Street, E1
Prescot Street was named for Rebecca Prescott, wife of William Leman. Prescot Street was originally Great Prescott Street and ran along the south of Goodman’s Fields.

The road was developed for good-quality housing and it became one of the earliest London streets to have numbered buildings (rather than signs). An early resident, before he moved to Soho Square, was the ’rough old admiral’ Sir Cloudesley Shovel.

From the late nineteenth century there was a synagogue in the street, and between 1857 and 1880 the Jewish Widows’ Home Asylum. In the early twentieth century the Association for the Protection of Women and Girls ran a refuge for young girls arriving in London who were deemed at risk from pimps and procurers.

Little Prescot Street was the continuation of Mansell Street, running from the western end of Great Prescot Street to Royal Mint Street; its original name was Rosemary Branch Alley.
»read full article


DECEMBER
5
2018

 

Alie Street, E1
Originally called Ayliff Street, Alie Street was named after a relative of William Leman, whose great-uncle, John Leman had bought Goodman’s Fields. Alie Street along with Leman Street, Prescot Street and Mansell Street from the turn of the eighteenth century while Goodman’s Fields was used as a tenterground.

In the 1800s this section of Alie Street was also known as Great Alie Street, with the extension which went east from Leman Street to Commercial Road being known as Little Alie Street.

Alie Street now links Mansell Street with Commercial Road.
»read full article


DECEMBER
4
2018

 

Whitehall, SW1A
Whitehall is recognised as the centre of the government of the United Kingdom. The name ’Whitehall’ was used for several buildings in the Tudor period - referring to their colour, consisting of light stone. This included the Royal Palace of Whitehall, which gave its name to the street.

The Palace of Whitehall was the residence of Kings Henry VIII through to William III before its destruction by fire in 1698. Whitehall was originally the road that led to the front of the palace. It was widened in the 18th century following the destruction of the palace.

It became a popular place to live by the 17th century. Oliver Cromwell had moved to Wallingford House in the street in 1647. Two years later, Charles I was carried through Whitehall on the way to his trial at Westminster Hall. Whitehall had sufficient space for a scaffold to be erected for the King’s execution in 1649. Cromwell in turn died at the Palace of Whitehall in 1658.

By the 18th century, traffic struggled along the narrow streets south of Holbein Gate. Th...
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DECEMBER
3
2018

 

Westminster
Westminster - heart of government. While the underground station dates from 1868, Westminster itself is almost as old as London itself. It has a large concentration of London’s historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus ofte...
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DECEMBER
2
2018

 

Spring Gardens, SW1A
Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace. The word ’Spring’ in this sense meant a plantation of young trees, especially one used for rearing game. The Spring Garden was shown on the Agas map as a little copse enclosed with a fence, and there are later references to pheasants and other "wild fowl" being preserved there.

In 1580 the garden was extended with a bowling green, a birdhouse, a bathing pool and the planting of orange trees. Before the end of James I’s reign, the garden had become a semi-public pleasure ground.

In 1631 a Simon Osbaldeston was appointed to keep "the Springe Garden and of the Bowling Greene there."

There was at least one house in Spring Garden as early as 1635 and more house building occurred over the next forty years. Towards the close of the 17th century, part of the Spring Garden had become a refuge for debtors. One of the most notorious was Sir Edward Hungerford and the Board of Greencloth finally to allow creditors to serve processes on...
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DECEMBER
1
2018

 

Fentiman Road, SW8
Fentiman Road is named after local mid-19th century developer John Fentiman. Fentiman Road is a broad, attractive road aligned northwest to southeast and has a leafy residential character.

On the north side, Vauxhall Park has a long frontage enclosed by railings and lends a leafy character to this end. Along from the park gate are the red brick, Tudor-revival Noel Caron Almshouses (1854) which have been established locally since the 17th century. Next to these are a row of 1830s stucco villas.

The south side of Fentiman Road is characterised by late 19th century terraced housing in two distinct groups.

Forming an attractive landmark at the junction with Meadow Road is the Cavalry Church, red brick in the Perpendicular style.
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