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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
October
3
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

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JULY
26
2022

 

Houghton Street (1906)
A greengrocer’s on the corner of Houghton Street and Clare Market (behind The Strand) in 1906 just before demolition The thoroughfare known as Clare Market, leading eastwards into Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was so called in honour of the Earl of Clare, who lived "in a princely mansion" adjacent. His name is inscribed as a parishioner of St. Clement Danes in the ratebooks of 1617. In Howell’s "Londinopolis" of 1657 we read: "Then is there, towards Drury Lane, a new market, called Clare Market; then is there a street and palace of the same name, built by the Earl of Clare, who lived there in a princely mansion, having a house, a street, and a market both for flesh and fish, all bearing his name." It is also mentioned by Strype:- "Clare Market, very considerable and well served with provisions, both flesh and fish; for, besides the butchers in the shambles, it is much resorted unto by the country butchers and higglers. The market-days are Wednesdays and Saturdays."

"This market," says Nightingale, in the tenth volume of the Beauties of England and Wales, "stands on what was...
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JULY
25
2022

 

The Hare
The Hare is situated at 505 Cambridge Heath Road The Hare has existed on this site since the 1770s. The current building dates from around 1860.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2022

 

High Barnet - Totteridge walk
This walk takes in the top of the Northern Line High Barnet is a London Underground station and, in the past, a railway station, located in Chipping Barnet. It is the terminus of the High Barnet branch of the Northern line and is the start of a walk which takes us on to Totteridge and Whetstone station.

High Barnet station was an idea of the Edgware, Highgate and London Railway and was opened on 1 April 1872 by the Great Northern Railway which had taken over by then. It was situated on one of the original sites of the Barnet Fair and was the terminus of the branch line that ran from Finsbury Park via Highgate.

The section north of East Finchley was incorporated into the London Underground network because of the Northern Heights project begun in the late 1930s. High Barnet station was served by Northern line trains from 14 April 1940 onwards.

The station retains much of its original Victorian architectural character, with some platform buildings dating from the pre-London Transport era.»more


MAY
18
2022

 

Drury Lane, WC2B
Named from Sir William Drury, Knight of the Garter in Queen Elizabeth’s reign, who owned land on its site As well as ’The Muffin Man’ who lived on Drury Lane, according to the famous nursery rhyme, the road was the location of the very first J Sainsbury store which opened in 1869.

But the street is much older - it originated as an early medieval lane which connected St Giles Hospital for lepers with the fields of Aldwych Close which were owned by the hospital.

Suffolk barrister Sir Robert Drury built a mansion called Drury House on the lane in the 1500s. After the death of his great-great-grandson (another Robert Drury) the property became the London house of the Earl of Craven. After that it was a pub called the Queen of Bohemia, his reputed mistress. The remains of the house, which had been progressively demolished, were finally cleared in 1809.

The site of the houses and gardens were built over as Drury Lane had become one of the worst slums in London, dominated by prostitution and gin palaces.

Things changed in ...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 506 completed street histories and 46994 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

DECEMBER
31
2018

 

Carlton Gardens, SW1Y
Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832. The cul-de-sac, named after the demolished Carlton House, contains seven large houses.

Lord Kitchener once lived at Number 2 and Number 4 was home to Lord Palmerston for a time and later served as Charles de Gaulle’s government in exile, Free France.

Boris Johnson as Foreign Secretary, resided on 2 Carlton Gardens from October 2016 to July 2018.

»read full article


DECEMBER
30
2018

 

Burlington Gardens, W1J
Burlington Gardens, with houses dating from 1725, was laid out on land that was once part of the Burlington Estate. Burlington Gardens was once part of Vigo Lane (or Vigo Street). The section behind Burlington House was renamed Burlington Gardens by 1831. Prior to that, it was part of Glasshouse Street.

The street joins Old Bond Street and New Bond Street in the west and Vigo Street in the east.

On the south side of Burlington Gardens is one end of the Burlington Arcade.
»read full article


DECEMBER
29
2018

 

St George’s Square, SW1V
St Georges Square is a long narrow space reaching to the river with an enclosed garden in the centre. At the eastern end is St. George’s Square (1850), a long narrow space reaching to the river with an enclosed garden in the centre. The houses are large. At No. 9 Sir J. Barnby d. 1896.

At the north end is St Saviour’s Church, built in 1864 from designs by Cundy in a Decorated Gothic style.
»read full article


DECEMBER
28
2018

 

Passmore Street, SW1W
Passmore Street, formerly Union Street, contains a social mix. Passmore Street contains both expensive modern private homes, cheek by jowl with social housing which is still owned and managed by the Grosvenor Estate.

Lumley Flats, built in 1875, was built by philanthropists to house the poor in the 19th century.
»read full article


DECEMBER
27
2018

 

Old Barrack Yard, SW1X
Old Barrack Yard is a narrow street of terraced cottages. It was originally the entrance to a cow pasture until a barracks for a regiment of Foot Guards was built in 1758.

In 1826 the area was leased by corn merchant Thomas Phillips who in 1830 built a maze of narrow streets, cottages and stables.
»read full article


DECEMBER
26
2018

 

St Thomas Street, SE1
St Thomas Street is an extremely old thoroughfare. St Thomas’s Hospital was sited here from about 1215 until 1862 when it was moved for the construction of London Bridge Station. The church here houses the Old Operating Theatre (used 1821-62) in the attic floor.

Within a courtyard is the chapel of Guy’s Hospital and a statue of its founder Thomas Guy.

The road now runs along one of the newest London landmarks - The Shard.
»read full article


DECEMBER
25
2018

 

Charville Lane, UB4
Charville Lane is an ancient lane of Hayes running east-west. Originally the road connected Pole Hill Road and went as far as West End Road. Since through traffic cannot travel the whole route, the detached section at the eastern end takes an alternative spelling: Sharvel Lane.

While the area between Woodrow Avenue, Kingshill Avenue, and Charville Lane was built up in the late 1930s, Charville Lane is remarkably rural considering its location, with farmland bordering it along much of its length. The soil, described in 1876 as ’clay, loam, and gravel’ is watered by a stream which crosses the road, the Yeading Brook, and which forms part of the eastern boundary of Hayes.


»read full article


DECEMBER
24
2018

 

Catherine Street, WC2B
Catherine Street runs from Russell Street in the north to Aldwych in the south. Catherine Street was originally laid out in the 1630s by Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford. When built it was closed at its southern end near its junction with Exeter Street. The southern end was the garden wall of Exeter House and the back of the White Hart Inn in the Strand.

Until the nineteenth century it was called Brydges Street after the fourth earl’s wife.

The street is now part of the theatre district of London’s West End and includes the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, the Duchess Theatre and the Novello Theatre.

The public houses in the street include Nell of Old Drury and the Opera Tavern. The Opera Tavern was built in 1879 to a design by the architect George Treacher.
»read full article


DECEMBER
23
2018

 

Brompton Road, SW1X
Brompton Road lies partly in Westminster and partly in Kensington and Chelsea. As an official name, Brompton Road did not exist until 1863. Until 1935 Brompton Road extended only as far as the junction with Thurloe Place, after which Fulham Road began.

There was always a lot of traffic on this old road, which linked London with parts of Surrey. From 1726 to 1826 the road was maintained by the Kensington Turnpike Trustees and was a turnpike.

Before this, the Kensington parish boundary enclosed a thin corridor encompassing Brompton Road up to Knightsbridge Green on the north, and up to the lane later to become Sloane Street on the south.

Until the 1760s, little development had occurred on the road with the land around being horticultural with nurseries.

Development commenced in 1763 in several places along both sides of the eastern part of Brompton Road, as far as Yeoman’s Row on the south and Brompton Square on the north, during the 1763-4 London building boom in London.

The street bec...
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DECEMBER
21
2018

 

Wilton Place, SW1X
Wilton Place was built in 1825 to connect Belgravia with Knightsbridge. Wilton Place stands on the site of a cow yard, and is a broad street with fine houses on the east side. Here is St. Paul’s Church, celebrated for the ritualistic tendencies of its successive vicars. The building by Cundy is handsome, in Early Perpendicular style, and has sittings for 1,800. It was enlarged and altered in 1889 and 1892, when a side-chapel, by Blomfield, was added. Adjoining is the Vicarage, and opposite are St. Paul’s National Schools.

Wilton Place is the location of The Berkeley, a five star hotel. Also St Paul’s Church, Knightsbridge can be found there. The church was built in 1843 by subscription and sited on the drill ground of the former barracks. It cost £11,000 with the site being donated by the Marquis of Westminster.

Both Lillie Langtry and botanist, William Bentham have lived in the street.

The Berkeley stands on the site of what was Esmeralda’s Barn. This was a nightclub given to Reggie Kray by the slum landlord Peter Rachman.
»read full article


DECEMBER
19
2018

 

Warren Street, W1T
Warren Street was named after Anne Warren (1737–1807), the wife of Charles FitzRoy, landowner. Charles FitzRoy was 1st Baron Southampton and was the local land owner, responsible for the development of the area. His grandfather had built the New Road (Euston Road).

Late in the eighteenth century, the Euston Road had started to urbanise and a parallel track to its south had been established which provide access to the rear of the new houses.

During 1791, FitzRoy went to work building Warren Street, along the line of the rough track. A variety of builders were employed in the development leading to different styles, though generally the houses are three-storey terraces.

Warren Street was named after his wife, Anne Warren. Her father had founded New York’s Greenwich Village and there are other Warren Streets in North America as a result.

Warren Street became popular place at first with artists and engravers. After the First World War, the motor trade made Warren Street (and Great Portland Street) their home for the next...
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DECEMBER
18
2018

 

Hamilton Place, W1J
Hamilton Place lies just to the north of Hyde Park Corner. Hamilton Place - initially Hamilton Street - came into being at the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in the person of Charles II.

Charles granted James Hamilton, a ranger of Hyde Park and later groom of the bedchamber, a corner of land which had been excluded from Hyde Park when it was walled. A street bearing Hamilton’s name (which eventually became Hamilton Place) was constructed from Piccadilly to the park wall but the houses on it were small with none of the elegance which later came to be associated with the area.

Towards the end of the 18th century, by which time Hamilton’s lease had been acquired by others, the houses in Hamilton Street were said to be “in a ruinous condition and intended to be removed.” They were replaced by a row of houses with a view over the park. Plans were then produced to build three new houses on Piccadilly to make a symmetrical group. Those surviving (141–144 Piccadilly) were demolished in the early 1970s, at t...
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DECEMBER
17
2018

 

Northern Outfall Sewer
The Northern Outfall Sewer (NOS) is a major gravity sewer which runs from Wick Lane in Hackney to Beckton sewage treatment works. Most of the system was designed by Joseph Bazalgette after an outbreak of cholera in 1853 and the "Great Stink" of 1858.

Prior to this work, central London’s drains were built primarily to cope with rain water, and the growing use of flush toilets frequently meant that they became overloaded, flushing sewage and industrial effluent into the River Thames.

Bazalgette’s London sewerage system project included the construction of intercepting sewers north and south of the Thames; the Southern Outfall Sewer network diverts flows away from the Thames south of the river.

In total five interceptor sewers were constructed north of the Thames; three were built by Bazalgette, two were added 30 years later:

The northernmost (High Level Sewer) begins on Hampstead Hill and is routed past Kentish Town and Stoke Newington and under Victoria Park to the start of the Northern Outfall Sewer at Wick Lane. Two middle level sewers ser...
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DECEMBER
17
2018

 

Hatch End
Hatch End is an area in the London Borough of Harrow to the south of the Hertfordshire border. Hatch End is an affluent area with many residents commuting into London. The tree-lined streets, parks, woodlands and golf courses make it a desirable place to live. Coupled with its low crime rate the suburb is popular with families and retirees who chose to remain in the area when downsizing. Regional shopping centres of Harrow and Watford are close by.

Hatch End is home to Harrow Arts Centre, a complex which centres on the 404 seat Elliott Hall and a 120-seat studio theatre.

The area also features several sports facilities, including Hatch End Swimming Pool, Hatch End Cricket Club and Hatch End Tennis Club. The Bannister Stadium & Bannister Sports Centre are located off the Uxbridge Road.

Its railway station dates from 1844.
»read full article


DECEMBER
16
2018

 

Chancery Lane, WC2A
Chancery Lane has formed the western boundary of the City of London since 1994, having previously been divided between the London boroughs of Westminster and Camden. Chancery Lane originates from before 1161 as a ’new lane’. It was created by the Knights Templar from the ’Old Temple’ on the site of the Southampton Buildings on Holborn, in order to access their newly acquired property (the present Temple).

The street takes its name from the historic High Court of Chancery established in 1161 when Robert de Chesney, Bishop of Lincoln, acquired the ’old Temple’.

On the eastern side was the original site of the Domus Conversorum (House of the Converts), a residence and chapel for Jews who had converted to Christianity, founded by King Henry III in the 13th century.

The site later became the Public Record Office designed by Sir James Pennethorne in 1851. In the latter half of the 20th century, records relocated to Kew. In 2001 it underwent renovation and became the Maughan Library.

Lincoln’s Inn occupies most of the western side of Chancery Lane north of Carey Street.

»more


DECEMBER
12
2018

 

Beeston Place, SW1W
Beeston Place was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate and the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire. The first name of the street was Ranelagh Street which itself was renamed as Ebury Street before the northern part began to go under the separate name of Beeston Place.

The oldest roads in the area were what are now Lower Grosvenor Place, Hobart Place, Ebury Street, Beeston Place and Buckingham Palace Road, all of which were established by the mid 18th century, and may be before this. The Rocque map shows a path where Beeston Place would run.

The 1792 Horwood map delineates the line of King’s Row (Buckingham Palace Road). It also shows that Ranelagh Street had been developed, and this street provides the axis by which today’s Grosvenor Gardens were formed. Ranelagh Street, Arabella Row, Belgrave Place and Eaton Street surrounded a block, which was subdivided by Eaton Lane North. Towards the end of the 18th century, the distinctive triangular shape of the northern block of Grosvenor Gardens was emerging.

Thomas Cundy was both the archi...
»more


DECEMBER
9
2018

 

Goodman’s Fields
Goodman’s Fields was a farm beyond the walls of the City. A House of Minoresses - the Abbey of St Clare was established in Aldgate in 1293. The convent ran a farm in the area and the the first recorded tenant was a Mr Trollope, who sold it to Roland Goodman, a wealthy London fishmonger and farmer.

After the Dissolution, the farm became known as Goodman’s Fields. It kept some 30 to 40 head of cattle and was still flourishing in 1601 when the historian John Stowe visited.

An heir of the original Goodman let the field to a variety of small tenants, first as grazing for horses, then for garden-plots and smallholdings, and is said to have lived ‘like a gentleman’ on the proceeds. By 1678, the land was beginning to to be sold off for the construction of housing.

The open ground was bought by Sir John Leman, Lord Mayor of London. His great-nephew William Leman laid out four streets, named after relatives - Mansell Street, Prescot Street, Ayliff Street (Alie Street) and Leman Street. John Strype in...
»more


DECEMBER
8
2018

 

Goodman’s Yard, E1
Goodman’s Yard is a street between Minories and Mansell Street. There was a glasshouse here before 1641, owned by Sir Bevis Thelwell. This bottles, white and green glasses. In 1661 it provided glassware for the newly-founded Royal Society.

The glasshouse became Jesse Russell’s soap and tallow factory.

There was an early Baptist chapel in Goodman’s Yard, noted in 1682.

In 1710 a ’loyal society’ (a precursor of modern day insurance companies) based at the "Red-Lyon near Goodman’s Yard" published proposals for insurance on the birth of children, and on marriage.

Pigot’s 1824 Metropolitan Guide states that there was an ’Irish Free School’ in Goodman’s Yard, and a report a few years later states that the East London Irish School had 140 male and 120 female pupils, and was partly supported by subscriptions and partly by payments from the children.

Railway viaducts completely changed the scene. A lattice bridge over Prescott Street and Goodman’s Yard, carried ...
»more


DECEMBER
8
2018

 

Heathrow Airside Road Tunnel
The Heathrow Airside Road Tunnel (ART) is a tunnel at London Heathrow Airport. It connects the airside roads around Terminals 2 and 3 to those around Terminal 5. The tunnel was opened to traffic in March 2005 and is used only by vehicles with security clearance to drive airside. It is 1.42 kilometres long.

The ART was designed and built between 1999 and 2004 by a team of engineers from BAA (now Heathrow Airport Holdings, the tunnel’s owner), AMEC, Laing O’Rourke, Morgan-Vinci JV and Mott MacDonald.
»read full article


DECEMBER
6
2018

 

Prescot Street, E1
Prescot Street was named for Rebecca Prescott, wife of William Leman. Prescot Street was originally Great Prescott Street and ran along the south of Goodman’s Fields.

The road was developed for good-quality housing and it became one of the earliest London streets to have numbered buildings (rather than signs). An early resident, before he moved to Soho Square, was the ’rough old admiral’ Sir Cloudesley Shovel.

From the late nineteenth century there was a synagogue in the street, and between 1857 and 1880 the Jewish Widows’ Home Asylum. In the early twentieth century the Association for the Protection of Women and Girls ran a refuge for young girls arriving in London who were deemed at risk from pimps and procurers.

Little Prescot Street was the continuation of Mansell Street, running from the western end of Great Prescot Street to Royal Mint Street; its original name was Rosemary Branch Alley.
»read full article


DECEMBER
5
2018

 

Alie Street, E1
Originally called Ayliff Street, Alie Street was named after a relative of William Leman, whose great-uncle, John Leman had bought Goodman’s Fields. Alie Street along with Leman Street, Prescot Street and Mansell Street from the turn of the eighteenth century while Goodman’s Fields was used as a tenterground.

In the 1800s this section of Alie Street was also known as Great Alie Street, with the extension which went east from Leman Street to Commercial Road being known as Little Alie Street.

Alie Street now links Mansell Street with Commercial Road.
»read full article


DECEMBER
3
2018

 

Westminster
Westminster - heart of government. While the underground station dates from 1868, Westminster itself is almost as old as London itself. It has a large concentration of London’s historic and prestigious landmarks and visitor attractions, including the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Cathedral.

Historically part of the parish of St Margaret in the City and Liberty of Westminster and the county of Middlesex, the name Westminster was the ancient description for the area around Westminster Abbey – the West Minster, or monastery church, that gave the area its name – which has been the seat of the government of England (and later the British government) for almost a thousand years.

Westminster is the location of the Palace of Westminster, a UNESCO World Heritage Site which houses the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The area has been the seat of the government of England for almost a thousand years. Westminster is thus ofte...
»more


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