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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
FEBRUARY
8
2023

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N
Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east. In 1608–09, Henry Howard, 1st Earl of Northampton built a house on the eastern side of the former Chapel and Hospital of St. Mary Rounceval, at Charing Cross, including gardens running to the River Thames and adjoining Scotland Yard to the west. The estate became the property of Algernon Percy, 10th Earl of Northumberland when he married Howard’s great-great niece, Lady Elizabeth, in 1642, whereupon it was known as Northumberland House.

In June 1874, the whole of Northumberland House was purchased by the Metropolitan Board of Works and demolished to form Northumberland Avenue, which would accommodate hotels. The road was part built on the parallel Northumberland Street.

Contemporary planning permissions forbade hotels to be taller than the width of the road they were on; consequently Northumberland Avenue was built with a wide carriageway. Part of the parallel Northumberland Street was demolished in order to make way for the avenue’s eastern...

»more

AUGUST
22
2022

 

Lover’s Walk, SE21
The walkway between Gallery Road and College Road has had many names There was a medieval field system between the two roads. In 1989, the Museum of London carried out an exploratory dig here to verify this. Amongt the fields, a path became known as Lovers Lane or Pensioners’ Walk.

In 1768 the right of way received an official name - The Grove. Grove Field lay on its south side.

Lover’s Walk had become its informal name by 1876 - in May that year, a news report recorded an incident here. In 2012, the Dulwich Estate agreed to calls for Lover’s Walk to be the formal name.

For cyclists it has yet another name - it is part of the Traylen Trail.


»read full article


AUGUST
21
2022

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
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AUGUST
20
2022

 

Rainham Road, NW10
Rainham Road, in Kensal Green, was laid out in 1895 The United Land Company bought a 6 acre triangle of land between Harrow Road and the Hampstead Junction railway in 1879, and an adjoining 21 acres from All Souls College in 1882. The whole area was laid out as high-density terraced housing and shops as far east as College Road.

The college leased 13 acres south of the L&NWR railway line to Edward Vigers, who by 1888 had laid out roads and started building 134 small terraced houses.

Rainham Road was let on building leases in 1895 and 30 houses had been built there by 1898.
»read full article


AUGUST
19
2022

 

Eton Avenue, NW3
Eton Avenue runs parallel with Adelaide Road, two blocks north From 1873 onward, William Willett and his son worked together as the chief building team in the area. In the early 1880s, they accepted the challenge of the Eton College estate by constructing Eton Avenue and surrounding roads.

The Willetts then moved on to both Lyndhurst Gardens and Wedderburn Road.

The houses set a precedent for aesthetic architecture in the speculative market. Drawing inspiration from English Queen Anne designs of the late 17th century, they were built with red brick, steep pitched roofs and tall chimneys. Dormers, gables, ornamental glass and ornamentation were other features that set them apart. Every single house was distinct.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Scott Hatton   
Added: 30 Jan 2023 11:28 GMT   

The Beatles on a London rooftop
The Beatles’ rooftop concert took place on the rooftop of the Apple Corps building in London. It was their final public performance as a band and was unannounced, attracting a crowd of onlookers. The concert lasted for 42 minutes and included nine songs. The concert is remembered as a seminal moment in the history of rock music and remains one of the most famous rock performances of all time.

Reply

Michael Upham   
Added: 16 Jan 2023 21:16 GMT   

Bala Place, SE16
My grandfather was born at 2 Bala Place.

Reply

   
Added: 15 Jan 2023 09:49 GMT   

The Bombing of Nant Street WW2
My uncle with his young son and baby daughter were killed in the bombing of Nant Street in WW2. His wife had gone to be with her mother whilst the bombing of the area was taking place, and so survived. Cannot imagine how she felt when she returned to see her home flattened and to be told of the death of her husband and children.


Reply
Lived here
Brian J MacIntyre   
Added: 8 Jan 2023 17:27 GMT   

Malcolm Davey at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square
My former partner, actor Malcolm Davey, lived at Raleigh House, Dolphin Square, for many years until his death. He was a wonderful human being and an even better friend. A somewhat underrated actor, but loved by many, including myself. I miss you terribly, Malcolm. Here’s to you and to History, our favourite subject.
Love Always - Brian J MacIntyre
Minnesota, USA

Reply
Lived here
Robert Burns   
Added: 5 Jan 2023 17:46 GMT   

1 Abourne Street
My mother, and my Aunt and my Aunt’s family lived at number 1 Abourne Street.
I remember visitingn my aunt Win Housego, and the Housego family there. If I remember correctly virtually opposite number 1, onthe corner was the Lord Amberley pub.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 30 Dec 2022 21:41 GMT   

Southam Street, W10
do any one remember J&A DEMOLITON at harrow rd kensal green my dad work for them in a aec 6 wheel tipper got a photo of him in it

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 26 Dec 2022 18:59 GMT   

Detailed history of Red Lion
I’m not the author but this blog by Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms has loads of really clear information about the history of the Red Lion which people might appreciate.


Source: ‘Professor Morris’ and the Red Lion, Kilburn

Reply

BG   
Added: 20 Dec 2022 02:58 GMT   

Lancing Street, NW1
LANCING STREET

Reply


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 549 completed street histories and 46951 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS

SEPTEMBER
27
2019

 

Eel Brook Common
Eel Brook Common is common land in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Eel Brook Common was previously manorial waste, enclosed by a 12-foot ditch and used for pasture. The name is probably derived from ’Hillbrook’, meaning a hill with a brook. Musgrave Crescent is situated on this hill and it is believed that this is artificial - possibly a Bronze Age mound.

Encroachments for building took place in the late 18th century. During the mid 19th century, the building of the District Railway further reduced the area. Public opposition prevented the Ecclesiastical Commissioners building on the land between Crondace Road and New Kings Road. Thereafter informal recreational use developed.

After 1883, the then amateur local football team, Fulham F.C., played their home games on the common. In 2009, Chelsea Football Club help create an astroturf pitch which can be used in the community.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2019

 

Deptford
Deptford is named after a ford of the River Ravensbourne. Deptford began as two small communities - one at the ford on the Ravensbourne with the other being a fishing village on the Thames (called West Greenwich).

During the reign of Henry VIII, it became home to Deptford Dockyard (the first of the Royal Dockyards) which lasted until the lat Victorian era. They were the main administrative centre of the Royal Navy. Deptford had a long royal connection and gave birth to the legend of Sir Walter Raleigh laying down his cape for Queen Elizabeth I. Captain James Cook’s third voyage aboard Resolution set out from here. Deptford became a major shipbuilding faciliry and attracted Peter the Great of Russia to arrive incognito to study shipbuilding.

The two Deptford communities grew together and flourished. The area declined as first the Royal Navy moved out, and then the commercial docks themselves declined until the last dock, Convoys Wharf, closed in 2000.

Opened in 1836, Deptford station is the olde...
»more


SEPTEMBER
24
2019

 

Cold Blow Lane, SE14
Cold Blow Lane was originally a lane leading to Cold Blow Farm. Cold Blow Farm was situated on the site of the Sanford Housing Cooperative and even after the Croydon Railway came in 1854 with its brick tunnel, most of this area of New Cross remained agricultural.

Earlier, another nineteenth century transport link, the Croydon Canal created the Coldblow Branch which terminated at the modern junction with Mercury Way.

By the turn of the twentieth century, an industrial area developed and the Coldblow Signal Works were built beside the former Gas Works.

Originally running north from the Old Kent Road, on the site of the former Millwall ground - The Den - Cold Blow Lane turns sharply east. The Old Den was the fifth football stadium occupied by Millwall F.C. since their formation on the Isle of Dogs in 1885 before moving to the New Den in May 1993. The ground opened in 1910 on the former industrial area and was the home of Millwall for 83 years.

Cold Blow Lane was split in two during the twen...
»more


SEPTEMBER
23
2019

 

Crabtree Farm
Crabtree Farm was Fulham’s last farm. It lay between Fulham Palace Road and Rannoch Road bounded on the north by Colwith Road and on the south by Crabtree Lane. The farmhouse used to exist at the junction of Larnach Road and Rannoch Road.

This area had been farmed since the early 19th century and was the property of the Matyear family. William Matyear, the last of the family to farm there was a bachelor who died in 1910.

It produced vegetables and strawberries for sale at Covent Garden Market. When in 1910 the farm was sold to Allen and Norris, local estate agents, they built several streets of houses upon it. Allen & Norris established their offices at the corner of Nella Road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2019

 

St Peter, Paul’s Wharf
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. First mentioned in the 12th Century It stood to the north of Upper Thames Street in Queenhithe Ward The parish was defiant in continuing to use the Book of Common Prayer during the Civil War.

St Peter’s was, along with most of the City’s other parish churches, destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. Fifty-one were chosen, but St Peter Paul’s Wharf was not among them. Following the fire the parish was united with that of St Benet Paul’s Wharf.

»read full article


SEPTEMBER
20
2019

 

South Mimms
South Mimms is a village in the Hertsmere district of Hertfordshire. It is a small settlement located near to the junction of the M25 motorway with the A1(M) motorway and is perhaps more widely known because of the service station at that junction which takes its name from the village, and for mountain biking routes in the area which start from the service station.

Before 1965’s creation of Greater London, it was part of Middlesex rather than Hertfordshire and, along with Potters Bar, was transferred to the latter county in that year.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
17
2019

 

No 1 Poultry, EC2R
No 1 Poultry is an office and retail building in London. It is located at the junction of Poultry and Queen Victoria Street, adjacent to Bank junction, in the City of London financial district. The building was designed by James Stirling for a site which then was owned by developer Peter Palumbo, and first assembled by Palumbo’s father, Rudolph, in the 1960s.

Originally intended to be the site of a modernist office tower designed by Mies van der Rohe in the manner of the Seagram Building in New York City, that scheme was aborted following one of the great architectural and planning show-downs of the 1970s.

A new design was created, Stirling’s final design, in a postmodernist style with an outer shell of bands of rose-pink stone. The structure was built after his death and is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of the postmodernist style in London.

In 2016, following proposals to alter it, it received government recognition with a listing at grade II*, making it the youngest listed building in England.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
16
2019

 

Air Street, SW1Y
Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658. ’Aire Street’ south of Regent Street followed the former boundary of Swallow Close and Round Rundles - it is a rather tiny street. The slightly longer northern section - north of Regent Street - formed a boundary of the Sherard estate and was originally Francis Street, named after Francis Sherard.

In 1676, there were already 23 houses in the street.

When the area was rebuilt, the two sections of Air Street leading north and south from Regent Street, each gained an archway.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
15
2019

 

St Matthew Friday Street
St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.

St. Matthew was the only church in the City of London dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street was so named, according to John Stow, after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records.

Cheapside was the principal market street of medieval London and many of the lesser streets running off were called after the commodity sold there, such as Milk Street, Bread Street and Wood Street. It is more likely, therefore, that Friday Street was so called from fishmongers vending, rather than living there.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
4
2019

 

Campden Hill, W8
Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington. The name of Campden Hill derives from a house called Campden House, built by Baptist Hicks whose country seat was in the Gloucestershire town of Chipping Campden.

The street called Campden Hill was built beside the grounds of the former Bute House, demolished in 1913.

Meanwhile the hill of this name lies in Holland Park, the former deer park of Holland House. The top of the hill was the site of water towers built in the 19th century by the Grand Junction and West Middlesex waterworks companies.

Writer GK Chesterton was born on Campden Hill.

1 Campden Hill dated from 1915 and built by Edmond Hills, President of the Royal Astronomical Society. A street named Observatory Gardens is situated nearby.

Holland Park School now lies to the north of the street.
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