The Underground Map


 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  OPENSTREETMAP  GOOGLE MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.478 -0.013, 51.537 -0.211) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Greenwich ·
MAY
8
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Greenwich
Greenwich is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames. Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was demolished to be replaced by the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained a military education establishment until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle es...

»more

APRIL
17
2021

 

West Smithfield, EC1A
West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area Smithfield and its market was founded in 1137. The ancient parish of St Sepulchre extended north to Turnmill Street, to St Paul’s Cathedral and Ludgate Hill in the south, and along the east bank of the Fleet (now the route of Farringdon Street). St Sepulchre’s Tower contains the twelve ’bells of Old Bailey’, referred to in the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". Traditionally, the Great Bell was rung to announce the execution of a prisoner at Newgate.

A livestock market was in the area as early as the 10th century.

As a large open space close to the City, Smithfield was a popular place for public gatherings. In 1374 Edward III held a seven-day tournament at Smithfield. Possibly the most famous medieval tournament at Smithfield was that commanded in 1390 by Richard II.

The Priory of St Bartholomew had long treated the sick. After the Reformation it was left with neither income nor monastic occupants but, following a petition by the C...
»more


APRIL
16
2021

 

Old Ford Road, E3
Old Ford Road stretches two and a quarter miles from Bethnal Green to Bow Old Ford Road represents two separate ways from different points to the sometime passage across the Lee, one being from the west, the other from the south, which in meeting converged with a third from the north which is known now as Wick Lane, the communication with Hackney.

In ancient times the estuary of the river Lee extended as far as Hackney Wick, and during the period when the Romans were in Britain the marshes which lay above it and on either side were crossed in the direction of Leyton by a stone causeway of which portions have been found, but of any contemporary road leading to it no traces have been discovered, although Roman remains were unearthed in 1868 in the coal and goods yard attached to Old Ford Station. The probability is that there was no military highway of massive construction such as those found elsewhere, but a track formed by use which led through woods and over the open fields to the first fordable place on the river Lee or Lea, a name derived ...
»more


APRIL
15
2021

 

Crossharbour
Crossharbour is a station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) Bank-Lewisham Line in Cubitt Town The station opened as ’Crossharbour’ on 31 August 1987 but was renamed in 1994 to ’Crossharbour and London Arena’. After the neighbouring London Arena was demolished in 2006, the original name was reinstated. Just to the north of the current station, the London and Blackwall Railway built Millwall Docks station. This operated between 1871 and 1926.

The ’cross harbour’ name refers to the nearby Glengall Bridge across Millwall Inner Dock. The bridge’s construction was a neccessity for the developers to obtain planning approval for the dock when it was built in 1868.

In 1969 Tower Hamlets council completed the St John’s estate on the Cubitt Town side of the station. The project was begun 17 years earlier by Poplar Borough Council.
»read full article


APRIL
14
2021

 

Narrow Street, E14
Narrow Street is a road running parallel to the River Thames through the Limehouse area Many archaeologists believe that Narrow Street represents the line of the medieval river wall. This wall was built to reclaim riverside marshland and to protect it from the tides.

A combination of tides and currents made this point on the Thames a natural landfall for ships. The first wharf was complete in 1348. Lime kilns or oasts (’lymehostes’) used in the production of mortar and pottery were built here in the fourteenth century.

Houses were then built, on the wall itself at first, but then outwards onto the foreshore by a process of encroachment. Indeed, the eastern end of Narrow Street was previously known as Fore Street.

The area grew rapidly in Elizabethan times as a centre for world trade. The neighbourhood supplied ships with ropes and other necessities; pottery was also made here for the ships. Ship chandlers settled here building wooden houses and wharves in the cramped space between street and river.

By the t...
»more





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply

   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

Reply
Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

Reply

Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
SEPTEMBER
27
2019

 

Eel Brook Common
Eel Brook Common is common land in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Eel Brook Common was previously manorial waste, enclosed by a 12-foot ditch and used for pasture. The name is probably derived from ’Hillbrook’, meaning a hill with a brook. Musgrave Crescent is situated on this hill and it is believed that this is artificial - possibly a Bronze Age mound.

Encroachments for building took place in the late 18th century. During the mid 19th century, the building of the District Railway further reduced the area. Public opposition prevented the Ecclesiastical Commissioners building on the land between Crondace Road and New Kings Road. Thereafter informal recreational use developed.

After 1883, the then amateur local football team, Fulham F.C., played their home games on the common. In 2009, Chelsea Football Club help create an astroturf pitch which can be used in the community.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2019

 

Deptford
Deptford is named after a ford of the River Ravensbourne. Deptford began as two small communities - one at the ford on the Ravensbourne with the other being a fishing village on the Thames (called West Greenwich).

During the reign of Henry VIII, it became home to Deptford Dockyard (the first of the Royal Dockyards) which lasted until the lat Victorian era. They were the main administrative centre of the Royal Navy. Deptford had a long royal connection and gave birth to the legend of Sir Walter Raleigh laying down his cape for Queen Elizabeth I. Captain James Cook’s third voyage aboard Resolution set out from here. Deptford became a major shipbuilding faciliry and attracted Peter the Great of Russia to arrive incognito to study shipbuilding.

The two Deptford communities grew together and flourished. The area declined as first the Royal Navy moved out, and then the commercial docks themselves declined until the last dock, Convoys Wharf, closed in 2000.

Opened in 1836, Deptford station is the olde...
»more


SEPTEMBER
25
2019

 

Knoyle Street, SE14
Knoyle Street is the eastern extension of Cold Blow Lane beyond the East London Railway. The line of Knoyle Street dates back to the early 1800s as simply a muddy footpath extending Cold Blow Lane.

The street has a confusing history of layouts. Originally it ran east-west but in the 1960s it was shortened and most of the street was newer, running in a quarter-circle north from the shortened section. Part of the Woodpecker Estate was built here.

When completed, the Woodpecker Estate consisted of eight tower blocks. In the centre of the estate was the main local shopping centre and a pub named The Spanish Steps. The estate became synonymous with gang culture in Lewisham and in 1992, an Estate Action Plan was drawn up for the regeneration of the estate. This resulted in all but one of its tower blocks being demolished and replaced with three storey blocks of flats.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
24
2019

 

Cold Blow Lane, SE14
Cold Blow Lane was originally a lane leading to Cold Blow Farm. Cold Blow Farm was situated on the site of the Sanford Housing Cooperative and even after the Croydon Railway came in 1854 with its brick tunnel, most of this area of New Cross remained agricultural.

Earlier, another nineteenth century transport link, the Croydon Canal created the Coldblow Branch which terminated at the modern junction with Mercury Way.

By the turn of the twentieth century, an industrial area developed and the Coldblow Signal Works were built beside the former Gas Works.

Originally running north from the Old Kent Road, on the site of the former Millwall ground - The Den - Cold Blow Lane turns sharply east. The Old Den was the fifth football stadium occupied by Millwall F.C. since their formation on the Isle of Dogs in 1885 before moving to the New Den in May 1993. The ground opened in 1910 on the former industrial area and was the home of Millwall for 83 years.

Cold Blow Lane was split in two during the twen...
»more


SEPTEMBER
23
2019

 

Crabtree Farm
Crabtree Farm was Fulham’s last farm. It lay between Fulham Palace Road and Rannoch Road bounded on the north by Colwith Road and on the south by Crabtree Lane. The farmhouse used to exist at the junction of Larnach Road and Rannoch Road.

This area had been farmed since the early 19th century and was the property of the Matyear family. William Matyear, the last of the family to farm there was a bachelor who died in 1910.

It produced vegetables and strawberries for sale at Covent Garden Market. When in 1910 the farm was sold to Allen and Norris, local estate agents, they built several streets of houses upon it. Allen & Norris established their offices at the corner of Nella Road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
22
2019

 

Argyle Road, W13
Argyle Road came into existence in 1870. The road finally allowed a direct route to the north from West Ealing. Previously, the only route in this direction was Drayton Green Lane, which twisted and turned around the fields and the ancient hamlet of Drayton.

Argyle Road wasn’t fully laid out until the early 20th century.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2019

 

St Peter, Paul’s Wharf
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. First mentioned in the 12th Century It stood to the north of Upper Thames Street in Queenhithe Ward The parish was defiant in continuing to use the Book of Common Prayer during the Civil War.

St Peter’s was, along with most of the City’s other parish churches, destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. Fifty-one were chosen, but St Peter Paul’s Wharf was not among them. Following the fire the parish was united with that of St Benet Paul’s Wharf.

»read full article


SEPTEMBER
20
2019

 

South Mimms
South Mimms is a village in the Hertsmere district of Hertfordshire. It is a small settlement located near to the junction of the M25 motorway with the A1(M) motorway and is perhaps more widely known because of the service station at that junction which takes its name from the village, and for mountain biking routes in the area which start from the service station.

Before 1965’s creation of Greater London, it was part of Middlesex rather than Hertfordshire and, along with Potters Bar, was transferred to the latter county in that year.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
19
2019

 

Frank Whipple Place, E14
East End campaigner Frank Whipple died in 2011 at the age of 103. Born in Ireland, Frank Whipple moved to east London with his family in 1916.

Having witnessed unrest on the streets in the garment business, where he was a shop steward, he became strongly political. He was involved in the 1926 General Strike, fought off fascists in Cable Street in the 1930s and worked as a policeman during the war.

After his wife Lily died in 1975, Frank dedicated his life to his disabled daughter Peggy at their home in Rhodeswell Road and lived to become the UK’s oldest registered carer.

In 2009, Tower Hamlets Council declared Mr Whipple a local hero and commissioned a set of photographs by Rankin.

A Millwall supporter since 1918, Mr Whipple had been the club’s oldest season ticket holder.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
17
2019

 

No 1 Poultry, EC2R
No 1 Poultry is an office and retail building in London. It is located at the junction of Poultry and Queen Victoria Street, adjacent to Bank junction, in the City of London financial district. The building was designed by James Stirling for a site which then was owned by developer Peter Palumbo, and first assembled by Palumbo’s father, Rudolph, in the 1960s.

Originally intended to be the site of a modernist office tower designed by Mies van der Rohe in the manner of the Seagram Building in New York City, that scheme was aborted following one of the great architectural and planning show-downs of the 1970s.

A new design was created, Stirling’s final design, in a postmodernist style with an outer shell of bands of rose-pink stone. The structure was built after his death and is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of the postmodernist style in London.

In 2016, following proposals to alter it, it received government recognition with a listing at grade II*, making it the youngest listed building in England.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
16
2019

 

Air Street, W1B
Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658. ’Aire Street’ south of Regent Street followed the former boundary of Swallow Close and Round Rundles. The northern section - north of Regent Street - formed the western boundary of the Sherard estate and was originally Francis Street, after Francis Sherard.

In 1676, there were 23 houses in the street.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
15
2019

 

St Matthew Friday Street
St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.

St. Matthew was the only church in the City of London dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street was so named, according to John Stow, after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records.

Cheapside was the principal market street of medieval London and many of the lesser streets running off were called after the commodity sold there, such as Milk Street, Bread Street and Wood Street. It is more likely, therefore, that Friday Street was so called from fishmongers vending, rather than living there.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
9
2019

 

Stoke Newington Church Street, N16
Stoke Newington Church Street links Green Lanes in the west to Stoke Newington High Street in the east. The road was noted as Newington Lane in 1403, then Church Street in 1576 and as Stoke Newington Church Street from 1937.

A number of notable properties flanked it: Newington Hall, Paradise House and Glebe Place amongst others.

Clissold Park is at one end of Church Street. Abney Park Cemetery which dates from 1840 has an entrance on the street. At the junction with Albion Road, was the municipal town hall and assembly hall of the former borough of Stoke Newington (refurbished in 2010). In Abney House, the Newington Academy for Girls of 1824 ran the world’s first school bus from Church Street to Gracechurch Street meeting house in the City, taking the pupils to Quaker worship.

In addition to many public houses and restaurants, the street is home to a wide range of independent shops.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
8
2019

 

Mapesbury Road, NW2
Mapesbury Road is named after Walter Map, prebendary from 1173–1192. Mapesbury was formerly the name for this whole area of Middlesex - Willesden Lane was known as Mapes Lane until the 1860s. It was countryside until the 1860s - after that residential development began and by 1875 there were a number of large suburban villas in the area.

Mapesbury Road laid out in 1894 over the lands of the former Mapesbury Farm and its was developed between 1895 and 1905. In 1982 Mapesbury Road became part of a conservation area.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
4
2019

 

Campden Hill, W8
Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington. The name of Campden Hill derives from a house called Campden House, built by Baptist Hicks whose country seat was in the Gloucestershire town of Chipping Campden.

The street called Campden Hill was built beside the grounds of the former Bute House, demolished in 1913.

Meanwhile the hill of this name lies in Holland Park, the former deer park of Holland House. The top of the hill was the site of water towers built in the 19th century by the Grand Junction and West Middlesex waterworks companies.

Writer GK Chesterton was born on Campden Hill.

1 Campden Hill dated from 1915 and built by Edmond Hills, President of the Royal Astronomical Society. A street named Observatory Gardens is situated nearby.

Holland Park School now lies to the north of the street.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
3
2019

 

Blechynden Street, W10
Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10 The stump that remains belies its story as one of the main streets of the area.

Blechynden Street crossed a 50-acre estate that a barrister, James Whitchurch, purchased for £10 an acre in the early 19th century. He left his home in Blechynden in Southampton and built himself a house in Lancaster Road, North Kensington, now situated at No. 133.

Streets were built on the estate in 1846, and the first were named Aldermaston, Silchester, Bramley and Pamber after four neighbouring villages near Basingstoke, which was where James Whitchurch’s daughter Florence Blechynden Whitchurch was living.

After dividing the land into plots, he leased them to builders such as John Calverley, a Notting Hill builder who named a street after himself.

Other developers involved were Joseph Job Martin, the landlord of The Lancaster Tavern in Walmer Road, as well as the developer of Martin Street. Stephen Hurst, a builder from Kentish Town, was r...
»more


PREVIOUSLY ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP...

Print-friendly version of this page


w:en:Creative Commons
attribution share alike
Unless otherwise given an attribution, images and text on this website are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licence.
If given an attribution or citation, any reuse of material must credit the original source under their terms.
If there is no attribution or copyright, you are free:
  • to share - to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to remix - to adapt the work
Under the following conditions:
  • attribution - You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • share alike - If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.

1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.