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Featured · Notting Dale ·
July
29
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Blechynden Street, W10
Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10 The stump that remains belies its story as one of the main streets of the area.

Blechynden Street crossed a 50-acre estate that a barrister, James Whitchurch, purchased for £10 an acre in the early 19th century. He left his home in Blechynden in Southampton and built himself a house in Lancaster Road, North Kensington, now situated at No. 133.

Streets were built on the estate in 1846, and the first were named Aldermaston, Silchester, Bramley and Pamber after four neighbouring villages near Basingstoke, which was where James Whitchurch’s daughter Florence Blechynden Whitchurch was living.

After dividing the land into plots, he leased them to builders such as John Calverley, a Notting Hill builder who named a street after himself.

Other developers involved were Joseph Job Martin, the landlord of The Lancaster Tavern in Walmer Road, as well as the developer of Martin Street. Stephen Hurst, a builder from Kentish Town, was r...

»more

JULY
13
2021

 

Eversholt Street, NW1
Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town The origins of Eversholt Street lay in the 1750s when the New Road (later Euston Road) was established to bypass the congestion of London. North of this road were fields, brick works and market gardens. There was an informal path heading south from what later became Camden Town roughly along the line of the later street.

At the end of the 17th century, the Lord Chancellor John Somers acquired the local freehold. The immediate area was, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, known as Fig Mead.

The course of Eversholt Street began in the 1810s as the area developed. It provided a new route from the New Road with Camden Town. The name Eversholt Street was originally given only to its very northern, Bedford Estate part above Cranleigh Street (which was itself formerly Johnson Street). The Eversholt name refers to a village in Bedfordshire, most of the land in the village being owned by the Dukes of Bedford.

Eversholt Street is now ...
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JULY
12
2021

 

Balcombe Street, NW1
Balcombe Street is possibly a corruption of Batcombe, Dorset, in line with other Dorset-related street names in the area Balcombe Street, Dorset Square and Gloucester Place all date from 1815-1820. Balcombe Street was at first known as Milton Street.

The streets formed part of the Portman Estate. Their layout shows a social hierarchy of square, thoroughfares and side streets mirrored by a hierarchy in the design of houses, from the grand four storey buildings in Dorset Square to the rather less grand terraces and smaller houses in Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place and the significantly smaller scale of the three and two storey ‘third rate’ houses in the side streets and mews.

There are some 180 grade II buildings including the whole of Dorset Square, most of Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place. The predominant materials are brick and stucco.

The London part of the Portman Estate in Marylebone covers 110 acres and covers 68 streets, 650 buildings and four garden squares. In 1948 the Estate, then valued at £10 million, was subject to death duties of ...
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JULY
11
2021

 

Oslo Court, NW8
Oslo Court was built between 1936 and 1938 by architect Robert Atkinson Oslo Court was built over the final remaining 30 workmen’s cottages in the St John’s Wood area. These were demolished in 1936, after which the gentrification of NW8 was more or less complete (Lisson Grove notwithstanding).

The block consists of seven floors containing 125 flats, 112 of which have a direct view over Regent’s Park.

This work of Robert Atkinson has been described as the style of ’restrained modernism’ by englishbuildings.blogspot.com. Crittall windows are used and there are small sculptural panels, with Nordic themes such as a reindeer and a long boat. Each flat was designed with a living room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and a small hall. Each also had a balcony, and a restaurant was provided on the ground floor for the use of tenants. The rents varied from £140 to £250 per annum, according to the outward aspect of the view.

Many blocks in the area had restaurants in days gone by but have, one by one, disappeared. ...
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JULY
10
2021

 

Waldegrave Road, TW11
Waldegrave Road is named after Frances Waldegrave and was the birthplace of Sir Noël Coward Waldegrave Road was named after Frances Waldegrave, the widow of the 7th Earl Waldegrave who lived at Strawberry Hill House, situated on the road in the 19th century.

The road is split into two sections - a Teddington (TW11) part and a Twickenham (TW1) section. The Teddington part of Waldegrave Road is noted for late Victorian semi-detached villas.

This road, connecting Teddington with Strawberry Hill, was at first known as Fry’s Lane. In the early nineteenth century it became Factory Lane after Alexander Barclay built a wax manufacturing factory in 1800. After the death of Frances, Lady Waldegrave, in 1879, the name changed to its modern form.

Following enclosure at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a large pond covered the south west part of the road at the centre of Teddington. In 1863, a new railway track was built through the site of the pond. A road bridge was constructed to reunite the two parts of Teddington that had been ...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

Reply
Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply

MAY
31
2020

 

Cottage Farm
Cottage Farm was sometimes marked ’Farm Cottage’ on maps This farm on Wrythe Lane was opposite the current Connaught Road and demolished in the late 1930s. During the 19th century, it was the home of Charles Simms, a lavender grower who brought up a family of six children there. Two of the children - Joseph and Charles - also became lavender growers. A road nearby is named after the Simms family - Simms Close.

Lavender was a ’medical herb’ and often grown along with mint.

At the very end of the farm’s life, some lavender was still grown, but the main crop had become vegetables. Cottage Farm was managed at its end by Luther Ansell, on behalf of the Carter family.
»read full article


MAY
30
2020

 

Frognal Corner
Frognal Corner is the junction between Chislehurst Road and the Sidcup Bypass. The Sidcup Bypass was part of a major upgrade of the London to Folkestone route and it opened in 1926.

It was soon very popular, causing difficulties for traffic crossing from Sidcup to Chislehurst. The result was a very early example of traffic lights.

This site is unrecognisable today, with the six lane A20 burrowing under the A222.
»read full article


MAY
29
2020

 

Tweeddale Road, SM5
Tweeddale Road is part of the 1930s St Helier Estate. The St Helier Estate is the second largest (825 acres) of the London County Council (LCC) cottage estates.

The architect was G. Topham Forrest who included natural aspects - existing trees, hedges, shrubberies and greens - in the plan. The design incorporates varying gables, porches and door canopies to reduce the design monotony found in many interwar estates.

The estate was constructed by C.J. Wills and Sons and was named after Lady St Helier, who had served on the London County Council and was noted for her good works with the poor.

As Morden was once in the possession of the Abbey of Westminster, many roads were named after monasteries in England and Wales, and five in Scotland.
»read full article


MAY
28
2020

 

Alexandra Park
Alexandra Park and palace were named in 1863, the year of the marriage of Alexandra of Denmark to the Prince of Wales. Alexandra Park was laid out on the site of Tottenham Wood and the later Tottenham Wood Farm.

A company was founded in the 1850s to build a venue to rival south London’s Crystal Palace which had inherited the main structure of the Great Exhibition of 1851 from Hyde Park. An Act of Parliamnent created the Alexandra Palace and Park Trust.

A lake within the park attracts a variety of waterfowl in all seasons. The park used to have a large enclosure housing a small herd of fallow deer who were moved to Devon in early 2016.

The Park hosts a variety of events throughout the year - food, craft and beer festivals, a summer festival and a fireworks festival.

Until September 1970, the park hosted horse racing.

The view from Alexandra Palace over the park is a notable view of London.
»read full article


MAY
27
2020

 

Morden
Morden is the southern terminus of the Northern Line. Morden gets its name either from the Saxon words "Mawr" (high) and Don (a hill), or possibly "The Den on the Moor".

Human activity in Morden dates back to the prehistoric period when Celtic tribes are known to have occupied areas around Wimbledon, London, but the first significant development in Morden was the construction of the Roman road called Stane Street from Chichester to London.

The route of Stane Street through Morden followed the current A24, London Road up Stonecot Hill from the south west crossing Morden Park to the west of the current dual carriageway road and passing through the pitch and putt golf course and the grounds of St Lawrence’s Church. The road then descended the other side of the hill towards the town centre passing west of the Underground station and crossing the north corner of Morden Hall Park heading in the direction of Colliers Wood and Tooting. Small Roman artefacts, mainly coins and pottery, have been found at various loc...
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MAY
25
2020

 

Shoreditch
Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. It is a built-up district located 2.3 miles (3.7 km) north east of Charing Cross. An old form of the name is Soersditch, and the origin is lost, though early tradition connects it with Jane Shore, the mistress of Edward IV.

It was the site of an Augustinian priory in the 12th Century until its dissolution in 1539. In 1576 the first playhouse (theatre) in England was opened, and in 1577 The Curtain theatre was opened in the middle of what is Curtain Road today.

During the 17th Century, wealthy traders and Huguenot silk weavers moved to the area, establishing a textile industry centered to the south around Spitalfields Market. The area declined along with the textile industry and from the end of the 19th Century to the 1960s, Shoreditch was a by-word for crime, prostitution and poverty.

Today Shoreditch is a busy and popular district, noted for its large number of art galleries, bars, restaurants, media businesses and an urban golf club.

Shoreditch High Street station officially opened to the public o...
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MAY
24
2020

 

Queen’s Gardens, SW1X
Queen’s Gardens was developed in about 1768–70. It was a small lane off of the Brompton Road.

Here, a builder called Meymott constructed some thirty small houses, with a public house called the ’Buttercup’ and two other houses facing the main road at its north end.

Harrods was later built over the top of the road at the beginning of the twentieth century.
»read full article


MAY
23
2020

 

Hans Crescent, SW1X
Hans Crescent forms part of an area informally called Hans Town which dates back to the 18th century. The area later occupied by Hans Crescent was originally covered by a large field called Long Field (or Long Close) and, while until 1842 a larger area including Long Close was copyhold land of the manor of Earl’s Court, in the early seventeenth century Long Close had been part of the very extensive local landholdings of Sir William Blake. Blake died in 1630 and most of the land descended eventually to Harris Thurloe Brace. That estate became called the Alexander or Thurloe estate.

Long Close though was inherited instead by William Browne. It was under Browne’s auspices that development of this area began - the buildings from the corner of Sloane Street and into Brompton Road up to Brompton Place, were first developed between about 1764 and 1793.

Henry Holland, a celebrated architect, was at work in the 1780s and built a street called Exeter Street. He constructed a street not previously planned to join his Exeter Street on Lord Cadogan’s land. New S...
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MAY
22
2020

 

Lover’s Walk, SE21
The walkway between Gallery Road and College Road has had many names. There was a medieval field system between the two roads. In 1989, the Museum of London carried out an exploratory dig here to verify this. Amongt the fields, a path became known as Lovers Lane or Pensioners’ Walk.

In 1768 the right of way received an official name - The Grove. Grove Field lay on its south side.

Lover’s Walk had become its informal name by 1876 - in May that year, a news report recorded an incident here. In 2012, the Dulwich Estate agreed to calls for Lover’s Walk to be the formal name.

For cyclists it has yet another name - it is part of the Traylen Trail.


»read full article


MAY
21
2020

 

Grovelands Park
Grovelands Park originated as a private estate. The Grovelands mansion - also known as ’Southgate Grove’, was built in 1797-98 for Walker Gray, a Quaker brewer, to the designs of John Nash. The grounds were landscaped by Humphry Repton.

After Gray’s death the property was acquired by John Donnithorne Taylor (one of the brewing Taylor family). His descentants continued to live at Grovelands up to the First World War.

Part of the estate was then purchased by the Municipal Borough of Southgate in 1913 to become a public park. Grovelands still exists on the western side of the park. It is Grade I listed on the National Heritage List for England.


»read full article


MAY
20
2020

 

Minories, EC3N
Minories is one of the old streets of the City of London. Minories runs north-south. The boundary between the City and the London Borough of Tower Hamlets used to run haphazardly between Minories and Mansell Street until boundary changes in 1994 relocated the present-day border along Mansell Street. Minories is now entirely within the City of London.

The name is derived from the former Abbey of the Minoresses of St Clare without Aldgate, founded in 1294. A small side-road off Minories is named St Clare Street. Minories was in the ancient parish of St Botolph without Aldgate until 1557, when it became extra-parochial.

The area was a ’papal peculiar’ outside the jurisdiction of the English bishops. The abbey was dissolved in 1539 and the property passed to the Crown. In 1686, the area became part of the Liberties of the Tower of London.

The Minories area historically hosted a large Jewish community.
»read full article


MAY
19
2020

 

Shepherd’s Bush Market
Shepherd’s Bush Market was first established in 1914. Shepherd’s Bush Market is located on the east side of a railway viaduct of the Hammersmith and City Tube line. It is distinct from New Shepherd’s Bush Market, which is located a short distance to the west along the Uxbridge Road.

Individual market vendors sell a wide variety of goods, including fresh produce, cooked food, music CDs, household goods and clothing. Individual vendors rent their stalls from Transport for London, who own the land on which the market sits. The market is open six days a week.
»read full article


MAY
18
2020

 

Dimco Buildings
The Dimco Buildings housed the earliest (extant) example of an electricity generating station built for the London Underground. Originally built in 1898 at the same time as the Wood Lane depot, the buidings were constructed as a power station for the Central London Railway - precursor of the Central line. The architect was Harry Bell Measures.

The power station was closed on 18 March 1928 when power for the line began to be supplied from Lots Road Power Station. The building was later used by the Dimco power tool company.

Today the Dimco Buildings part of house White City bus station, are Grade II listed.

The Dimco buildings were used as a filming location for the Acme Factory in the 1988 film ’Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’.
»read full article


MAY
17
2020

 

Paddington Fire Station
Paddington Fire Station was situated at 492-498 Edgware Road. The fire station opened in 1894 after the site was purchased by the London County Council Fire Brigade Committee. It replaced an earlier station built by the Metropolitan Fire Brigade.

It was used until 1969 when a new fire station was opened by the Greater London Council on the Harrow Road.
»read full article


MAY
16
2020

 

Newington Green, N16
Newington Green is a road, open space and neighbourhood on the border between Islington and Hackney. Appearing in the Domesday Survey of 1086, the main activity for centuries was agriculture - latterly growing hay for nearby London.

In the 16th century, the area became connected to the court of Henry VIII. The king reputedly used a house on the south side of the Green and in 1523 a resident of the north side of the Green, in Brook House, was the future 6th Earl of Northumberland, Henry Percy. He was noted for his role in the affairs of Anne Boleyn. Brook House was later demolished, renamed Bishop’s Place, and divided into tenements.

The area became the home of English Dissenters during the 17th century. They moved to places tolerant of them and one such place was Newington Green. A dissenting academy was set up on north of the Green, run by Charles Morton. One of the academy’s students was Daniel Defoe, the writer famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe. Another pupil was Samuel Wesley, father of John Wesley.

One of the most notable resi...
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MAY
15
2020

 

Mildmay Park, N1
Mildmay Park was named after Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer under Elizabeth I. Sir Walter Mildmay was one of the special commissioners in the trial of Mary, Queen of Scots. He founded Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1584.

Many 1850s thoroughfares are named after Mildmay, including Mildmay Road, Mildmay Grove North and Mildmay Grove South.

Mildmay Park became a Jewish area in the late nineteenth century until the 1930s, and had a radical club and a synagogue. The club’s premises survive as the home of the less radical Mildmay Club.

Mildmay Park was also a station on the North London Railway and situated on the street. Opened in 1880, it closed in 1934. The station building was demolished in 1987, but remnants of the platforms can still be seen at track level.
»read full article


MAY
14
2020

 

Clarendon Road, WD6
Clarendon Road runs north from Shenley Road. The road is older than most streets in Borehamwood, dating as it does from prior to the First World War. It receives its name from the Earl of Essex and Clarendon who also built the Nascot estate in Watford a few decades previous to its construction.

Clarendon Road and Eldon Avenue are now the two entrances into the BBC Elstree Centre, previously ATV/Central TV and the Rock Studios before that.
»read full article


MAY
13
2020

 

Streatham Vale
The development of Streatham Vale dates from the 1920s. Although the Greyhound Inn was established around 1730, the area was rural until the early twentieth century.

In 1875, the western half of Greyhound Lane became Streatham Vale.

From 1922, the Streatham Vale Estate - built largely by two firms, R.H. Miller and Wates of Norbury - kickstarted suburban development.

Around 1930 schools opened on Streatham Vale, the Greyhound Inn was rebuilt and the River Graveney was culverted to prevent flooding.
»read full article


MAY
12
2020

 

Abercairn Road, SW16
Abercairn Road was the first road laid out in the Streatham Vale Estate. Abercairn Road and its offshoots were first constructed by the builder R.H. Miller in 1922.
»read full article


MAY
11
2020

 

Acklam Road, W10
Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway. Alongside the railway line boundary of the Golborne and Colville wards, Acklam Road was built in the late 1860s and stood for a hundred years.

The road took its name from the Acklam village, now in Middlesborough, which like Rillington and Ruston is close to the Yorkshire country seat of the North Kensington developer Colonel St Quintin.

Acklam Road was built under the direction of the Land and House Investment Society Ltd.

One side of Acklam Road was demolished to make way for the Westway flyover in the late 1960s. The road was the centre of protest and a notable contemporary photo features a banner displayed as part of the action.
»read full article


MAY
11
2020

 

Eardley Road, SW16
Eardley Road dates from the 1870s. In 1875, the local station was renamed Streatham Common in place of its former name of Greyhound Lane.

Just after this date, the first houses appeared on Eardley Road and a handful of industries were established, bringing local employment opportunities.
»read full article


MAY
10
2020

 

Streatham Vale, SW16
Streatham Vale was created when Greyhound Lane was split in two by the arrival of the railway. The lane began as a track connecting Mitcham with Norwood. By 1730, the Greyhound Inn was in existance.

The opening of Greyhound^ Lane station in 1862 at first brought few changes to the rural area. In 1875 the station was renamed Streatham Common and after that date half of Greyhound Lane became Streatham Vale.

In 1922, the Streatham Vale Estate was built. The building firm Wates of Norbury built eastwards from Streatham Vale to the railway.

Subsequently, schools opened on either side of Streatham Vale and the Greyhound Inn was rebuilt.
»read full article


MAY
9
2020

 

Nickleby Close, UB8
Nickleby Close is a road of terraced housing, established in the 1980s. The other roads on the estate all have literary names - either authors or fictional characters from 19th century English literature.

Nicholas Nickleby was the hero of a Charles Dickens novel. His father had died and left Nicholas and his family penniless. While Nicholas was honest and steadfast, his youth led him to be naïve, and emotional. He devoted himself primarily to his friends and family and fiercely defied those who wronged the ones he loved.

In his preface to the novel, Dickens writes: "There is only one other point, on which I would desire to offer a remark. If Nicholas be not always found to be blameless or agreeable, he is not always intended to appear so. He is a young man of an impetuous temper and of little or no experience; and I saw no reason why such a hero should be lifted out of nature."
»read full article


MAY
9
2020

 

Harlesden
Harlesden - reggae capital of London In the 19th century, Harlesden, then a rural village, began to develop some of its urban appearance with the arrival of the railways. Willesden Junction, Kensal Green and Harlesden station stations all had an effect on the developing village. Cottages for railway and industrial workers were built, as was grander housing for the local middle class. To the east of Harlesden, there were still several farms, Elmwood, Haycroft, Upper Roundwood, and Sellon’s until the late 1890s.

Harlesden was at the height of its prosperity at the turn of the 20th century. Largely middle-class, it had a strong sense of identity compounded largely of civic pride and religious nonconformity. Nine churches and chapels were built between 1876 and 1902 as were a court house, a library, a constitutional clubhouse, and a jubilee clock, the focus of High Street. Willesden Hippodrome, a large music hall, opened in 1907. Much of High Street, a major shopping centre, was rebuilt in the Edwardian peri...
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MAY
8
2020

 

Gorringe Park Avenue, CR4
Gorringe Park^Avenue predates the rest of this area’s development by half a millennium. Gorringe Park was the old name for this far northern part of Mitcham. As noted by ’Hidden London’, it is an answer to the riddle that there’s no word rhyming with ‘orange’.

Already by the 15th century, the future Gorringe Park^Avenue was the track leading to Biggin Farm - a farm and later also a grand house - in the 15th century from the London Road. Also known as Biggin Grove, the fields covered the area east of Figge’s Marsh up to the South London, Peckham and Sutton Railway’s line.

Biggin Grove was pulled down in 1821 and the grounds became largely agricultural. However, in the 1860s, a villa named Gorringe Park had been built, owned by the Wilson family.

In the 1890s and 1900s, the surrounding land owned by the Wilsons was developed with housing.

The Wilsons helped fund the neo-gothic St Barnabas church on Gorringe Park^Avenue, designed by architect Henry Burke-Downing.

Gorringe Park became a ...
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MAY
7
2020

 

Union Street, W1W
The easternmost section of Riding House Street was previously known as Union Street. Riding^House^Street (previously called Riding^House Lane) extended west from Edward Street only as far east as Great Titchfield Street. East of Great Titchfield Street this was Union Street, which became part of Riding House Street in 1937.

The name Union Street dates from 1764 and reflects an accord between the Portland and Berners Estates, whose boundary line the street followed. Its layout dates from 1759 or so.
»read full article


MAY
6
2020

 

Riding House Street, W1W
Riding House Street commemorates a riding house and barracks of the First Troop of Horse Grenadier Guards. In 1726, John Wood was granted a lease by the Cavendish–Harley Estate to build a riding house on the open ground north of the present line of Mortimer Street. It was one of a number of such buildings to appear on the margins of London in the early eighteenth century. In them, military officers and gentlemen would learn equine comportment.

The riding house here was completed in 1727 and was about 120 feet long, barn-like and with a high-pitched roof. It stood immediately south of what became called Riding House Lane. Off Great Portland Street, a passage gave access to the barracks at the back of the site.

In 1736, a stable range on its south side was added by John Lane, Surveyor of the Horse Guards. This left room for houses along Mortimer Street.

The Troop was disbanded in 1788. In 1789, Isaac Stacey replaced the barracks and stables with a coach repository. The riding house itself was subsequently adapted for use as livery stables.
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MAY
5
2020

 

Mitcham Eastfields
Mitcham Eastfields is a railway station which opened on 2 June 2008. Eastfields is an area situated between Mitcham and Streatham. It is home to St Mark’s Academy and the area has two council estates, Laburnum and Eastfields Estate, 5 minutes away from each other.

Proposals for the station at Mitcham Eastfields had existed since the 1930s. Initially known as simply ’Eastfields’ during planning and construction, building started in October 2007.

Mitcham Eastfields cost £6 million to put into operation and it was the second station to be built to a modular design developed by Network Rail.
»read full article


MAY
4
2020

 

All Saints Road, W11
Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road. The church of All-Saints-With-St Columb was built by the the Reverend Samuel Walker, who came from St Columb Major, near St Ervan Cornwall: hence also the names of nearby Cornwall Crescent and St Ervan’s Road.

In 1852, Walker bought several fields of Portobello Farm and spent thousands of pounds developing them, starting with the church.

The church was isolated and derelict for ten years and local residents and irreverently called it ’Walker’s Folly’ or ’All Sinners in the Mud.

By the 1950s, All Saints Road was attracting its first West Indian immigrants. Nearby was the Tavistock Road lodging house of Mrs Fisher, who was known as the first Notting Hill landlady to rent to black people.

Amongst many cinematic claims to fame, Ringo Starr’s ’walkabout’ from ’A Hard Day’s Night’ partly took place in the street.

The Westway motorway was built to the north of All Saints Road in 1969 and betwe...
»more


MAY
3
2020

 

Ada Street, E8
Ada Street was named for one of the Pritchard family, local landowners. The Pritchards owned an estate covering this land in the early nineteenth century. The northern limit of the estate was Duncan Road with Sheep Lane on its eastern limit.

Some streets, laid out around 1831 or later, were named after the first names of family members, including Ada Street, Emma Street and Marian Street.

Broadway Market, at the western end of Ada Street, was from about 1800 known as Margaret Place. In 1831, to the north of the Cat and Mutton Bridge, it was renamed Pritchards Place and then Duncan Place. Later it was called Broadway with the ’Market’ added in the late 19th century.
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MAY
1
2020

 

Brick Lane, E2
The northernmost section of Brick Lane lies within the E2 postcode. Formerly called Whitechapel Lane, Brick Lane was named after the brick manufacture that took place in the area after the 15th century.

In 1890, the northernmost section was extended northwards across Bethnal Green Road as far as Columbia Road, absorbing Tyssen Street and Turk Street.

In the 1950s, this north section was truncated below Chambord Street.
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