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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
JANUARY
16
2022

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
The 1912 streets of Spitalfields
The fascinating story of one man’s random walk in 1912 On Saturday 20 April 1912, a man by the name of C.A. Mathew - a resident of Brightlingsea, Essex - came out of Liverpool Street Station carrying his camera. There’s no telling why he decided to walk the streets of Spitalfields and take photographs on that day - it may well have been a commission but, over a hundred years later, nobody really knows.

NOTE: Many writers about C.A. Mathew’s tour of Spitalfields, including the gentle author, have assumed Liverpool Street station’s involvement in the story. This is a safe assumption - the London terminus of the route from Brightlingsea but is not a definite! But we’ll run with it too...

Matthew only took up photography in 1911, the previous year. Eleven years later, he died. He produced no other known work and little else is known about him.

»more

NOVEMBER
16
2021

 

Suffield Road, SE17
Suffield Road was laid out after the demise of the Royal Surrey Zoological Gardens The Royal Surrey Zoological Gardens grew out of a menagerie started by Edward Cross in 1831 - he had previously exhibited at Exeter Change in the Strand.

The gardens were designed by Henry Phillips and highly praised - they were compared favourably with the Regent’s Park Zoological Gardens. The land of the zoo had previously been the 19-acre Lorrimore Common.

Cages for lions, tigers and other animals were enclosed within a glasshouse, 300 feet in circumference.

The gardens covered roughly the area between Suffield Road on the north, Lorrimore Road to the south, Penrose Street and Borrett Road on the east, and Chapter Road/Delverton Road to the west.

Edward Cross retired in 1844 and, under the new management of William Tyler, fell under hard times. He sold the animals in 1855 in order to keep the enterprise afloat but in 1856 seven people were killed in a stampede during a sermon by a local Baptist minister. The resulti...
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NOVEMBER
15
2021

 

Bow Locks
Bow Locks is a set of bi-directional locks in Bromley-by-Bow Bow Locks link the tidal Bow Creek to the River Lee Navigation.

The first recorded mention of water control at the site was during the reign of Edward I. Henry de Bedyk of Halliwell Priory and owner of the nearby tide mills erected a structure some time before 1307. A description of its operation in 1416 indicates that it consisted of a dam with a navigable 18 feet wide channel through it. The owners of the mills rebuilt the structure - now referred to as a lock - in 1573.

With the river was important for trade, an engineer called John Smeaton was asked to recommend improvements in 1765. He suggested a cut from Bow Locks to Limehouse. The Limehouse Cut was opened in 1777, but the lock was not altered.

A pound lock was constructed between 1851 and 1852, to accommodate barges up to 108 by 20 feet. The trustees imposed a toll for using the lock but this was unpopular with the bargees. A compromise was reached, where use of the lock required t...
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NOVEMBER
14
2021

 

Highams Park Estate, IG8
The Highams Park Estate was an estate of 176 prefabs which existed between 1947 and 1961 In 1947 Walthamstow Council erected prefab homes in Highams Park - some of the layout of the roads is still visible in the park. These were erected in order to address the local post-war shortage of homes after bombing.

Three years earlier, the Churchill coalition government introduced the Housing (Temporary Accommodation) Act to provide temporary houses - there was an anticipated shortfall of 200 000 homes. The proposal was to address the shortfall by building 500 000 pre-fabricated houses with a planned lifetime of ten years within a five year period. These became popularly known as ’prefabs’.

At the end of the war, the Labour government of Clement Attlee, agreed to deliver 300 000 units within a decade, within a budget of ÃÆ’Æ’Æ’ÃÆ’¢â‚¬ÅÃâ€...
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NOVEMBER
13
2021

 

Folgate Street, E1
Folgate Street, formerly White Lion Yard and White Lion Street, has 17th century origins The development of Folgate Street by the St John and Tillard Estate did not involve building a new street but repurposing an existing one - this older street ran from Wheler Street to Norton Folgate and had probably been developed from a yard, perhaps at about the same time that Wheler Street was built. In the late seventeenth century, Folgate Street was known as White Lion Yard.

The western end of the street is shown in the Hollar map dating after the Great Fire. In the 1675 tax returns, sixty houses were listed as being in White Lion Yard. The street was most likely completely rebuilt by the mid-eighteenth century.

One of more building leases were granted in 1697 and in 1704 White Lion Yard was "a certain place - commonly called White Lyon Yard intended to be rebuilt and called White Lyon Street". On plans of 1711-12, the lower part of Blossom Street, shown as Sote’s Hole, is in existence. Some of the buildings on the north side of White L...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

Reply

Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply

Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

Reply
Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

Reply
Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

JUNE
30
2020

 

Thorpe Close, W10
Thorpe Close is a redevelopment of the former Thorpe Mews, laid waste by the building of the Westway. Thorpe Mews disappeared in 1965 as the local area was being demolished. The mews was revived as Thorpe Close once the Westway was built.
»read full article


JUNE
30
2020

 

Hanwell
Hanwell is the westernmost London postcode (W7). The earliest surviving reference is 959 BCE when it was recorded as ’Hanewelle’.

The original borders of the parish stretched from the River Brent at Greenford down to the River Thames.

Hanwell grew between the wars and the 140 acre London County Council Hanwell cottage estate was built between 1918 and 1939.

Hanwell railway station, opened in 1838, is situated on the Elizabeth Line between West Ealing and Southall.
»read full article


JUNE
29
2020

 

Barnet Gate Lane, EN5
Barnet Gate Lane runs from Barnet Road before its name changes to Mays Lane when it reaches Totteridge. Barnet Gate Lane is named after Barnet Gate. There was never a tollgate here as is often the case with places named ‘Somewhere Gate’ – just a barrier that prevented cattle from straying onto Barnet Common.

It was first called Grendel’s Gate, after the monster slain by Beowulf, and it has been suggested that the use of such a portentous name may have indicated a place of some significance in Saxon times.

It was certainly more important than it is now, for manor courts were held here in the Middle Ages and Hendon Wood Lane was a busy thoroughfare that may have been a Roman road. Roman coins, now lost, were found at Barnet Gate some years ago.

Barnet Gate mill (also known as Arkley Mill) was built in 1806 and survives today in the back garden of a private house, east of Brickfield Lane. The mill is visible slightly above and to the left of the centre of the satellite map below.
»read full article


JUNE
29
2020

 

Hayes and Harlington
Hayes and Harlington is a railway station in the London Borough of Hillingdon. The station is on Isambard Kingdom Brunel's former Great Western Main Line running out of London Paddington to the Thames Valley, Bristol, South Wales and the West Country.

The line was opened on 4 June 1838, initially running to a temporary Maidenhead station to allow completion of the famous brick arch bridge over the River Thames just west of the station. The station at Hayes opened in 1868.

From 1 March 1883, the station (then named Hayes) was served by District Railway services running between Mansion House and Windsor. The service was discontinued as uneconomic after 30 September 1885.

Hayes is the location of the junction for the Heathrow Airport branch and is a station on Crossrail.

The film 'Trains at Hayes Station' showing trains passing through the station with stereophonic sound was filmed from the roof of the defunct Aeolian pianola factory just north of the station. The factory had been purchased by HMV ...
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JUNE
28
2020

 

Hercules Road, SE1
Hercules Road runs north from Lambeth Road near Lambeth Palace, on the site of Penlington Place. The road is named after Hercules Hall, which was built by and was the home of Philip Astley (1742-1814), riding instructor, horse-trainer, and acknowledged as the inventor of the modern circus.

Performing nearby in an open field behind the present site of St John’s Church, Waterloo, Astley realised the advantages of riding in a circle, and thus invented the circus ring. He was a principal among the many performers who made Lambeth a popular entertainment resort at that time.

Historically, Hercules Road is most well known for a former resident, the poet and visionary artist William Blake (1757-1827), who lived in a large house, 13 Hercules Buildings, and his address was Mr Blake Engraver, Hercules Buildings, Westminster Bridge. There is a series of mosaics inspired by Blake in a tunnel nearby. The site is marked with a plaque.

Hercules Road was a location for the film ’Passport to Pimlico’.

The Pineapple public house is located at 53-55 Hercules Road.
»read full article


JUNE
27
2020

 

Barkingside
Barkingside is a district in northern Ilford. Barkingside is mainly known for the children’s charity Barnardo’s - founded there in 1866. One of the oldest buildings in Barkingside is the Barnardo’s chapel.

The Holy Trinity Church dates from 1840.

Barkingside station originally opened in 1903 as part of a Great Eastern Railway branch line - the ’Fairlop Loop’ - from Woodford to Ilford via Hainault. The railway service was partially designed to stimulate suburban growth. The Great Eastern Railway became in 1923 part of the London & North Eastern Railway.

As part of the 1935–1940 ’New Works Programme’, the majority of the loop was to be transferred to form part of the Central line. Electrified Central line passenger services finally started in 1948.

Barkingside is ethnically diverse district but particularly notable for a high concentration of London’s Jewish population.
»read full article


JUNE
26
2020

 

Lisson Grove, NW1
The southern end of Lisson Grove was the location of a hamlet and open space, both called Lisson Green. Lisson Green is described as a hamlet in the Domesday book.

Originally Lisson Grove was part of the medieval manor of Lilestone which stretched north to Hampstead. Lisson Green broke away as a new manor in 1236 and had its own manor house.

’Lissing Green’ becames a recreation area for Londoners. By the 1790s, the Green was a large open space stretching down to Chapel Street and the Old Marylebone Road. Beside it on Lisson Grove, the Lissing Green/Lissom Grove village was part of a network of country lanes, on the east side of Edgware Road. At the southern end of the Green was the Yorkshire Stingo inn from whence stagecoaches set off for all parts.

Earlier, in 1771, Lisson Green was bought by James Stephens and Daniel Bullock, manufacturers of white lead. They set up the White Lead Manufactory next to the Nursery Garden, with unrecorded consequences to health. But until the late 18th century the district remained essentially rural.
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JUNE
25
2020

 

Ashcombe Street, SW6
Ashcombe Street was part of the Morrison’s Farm Estate. By 1895, Fulham was undergoing a property boom - large areas that were farms and market gardens were having housing built on them. One of these was Morrison’s Farm, situated to the west of Wandsworth Bridge Road and which stopped being a farm in 1894.

The Premier Land Company Limited had bought the farm’s freehold and drawn up a street plan to replace the fields. The streets were called Ashcombe Street, Beltran Road, Clancarty Road, Friston Street, Narborough Street, Settrington Road and Woolneigh Street.

William Gilbert Allen won the contract to build the estate.
»read full article


JUNE
22
2020

 

Kew Green
Kew Green is a large open space owned by the Crown Estate and extending to about thirty acres. The northern, eastern and southwestern sides of the Green are largely residential with some pubs, restaurants, and the Herbarium Library. To the north of the Green is Kew Bridge and the South Circular Road leading from the bridge runs across the Green, dividing it into a large western part and a smaller eastern part.

At the south end is St Anne’s Church and at the west end of the Green is Elizabeth Gate, one of the two main entrances into Kew Gardens.

A large triangular space, Kew Green is mentioned in a Parliamentary Survey of Richmond taken in 1649. Kew Green became notable as a venue for cricket in the 1730s and a parcel of land at the edge of the Green was enclosed by George IV in the 1820s.

Near the northeast corner of Kew Green is Kew Pond, originally thought to have been fed from a creek of the tidal Thames. During high tides, sluice gates are opened to allow river water to fill the pond via an underground channel.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2020

 

Long Lane, UB10
Long Lane runs roughly parallel with and about half a mile east of the River Pinn. Until the 20th century, there were only two major roads: the road from the district towards Harefield (later Park Road) and Long Lane running south from Ruislip and Ickenham to the London road east of Hillingdon village.

Ickenham village was situated at the junction of the modern Swakeleys Road and Long Lane. At this junction Long Lane widened to form a roughly triangular village centre for Ickenham. Until the 1930s most of the local houses were grouped around this spot.

Ickenham began to change after the sale of most of the Swakeleys estate in 1922. By 1934, larger dwellings and blocks of flats had been built along Long Lane.

Early 20th-century expansion was to transform the formerly distinct settlements of the area. By 1934 private housing estates and access ways covered much of the triangular area between Hillingdon village, Colham Green, and Goulds Green. Further private building was concentrated north of Hillingdon village along Long ...
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JUNE
21
2020

 

Harrow-on-the-Hill
Harrow-on-the-Hill station is a London Underground station served by National Rail and London Underground trains. The station is located in the town centre of Harrow, about half a mile north of the locality from which it takes its name.

The station was opened as ’Harrow’ on 2 August 1880, as the Metropolitan Railway extended from its previous terminus at Willesden Green. Its name was changed to ’Harrow-on-the-Hill’ in 1894. The station is located at the foot of Harrow hill which was at the time of opening a small hamlet called Greenhill. It has since become the main centre of Harrow.

Had the governors of Harrow School not made objections during the planning stage, it is possible that the Metropolitan Railway might have followed a different route taking it closer to the town centre on the hill.
»read full article


JUNE
18
2020

 

Rowena Crescent, SW11
Rowena Crescent was once called Zulu Crescent. The Falcon Estate, of which Rowena Crescent is part, was laid out by Alfred Heaver in 1880.

Rowena Crescent was set back some distance from the railway when the street opened that year. The original streets on the Falcon Estate were named after British victories throughout the Empire which had taken place before the Estate was designed. Therefore we find a Candahar Road, Khyber Road and an Afghan Road named after the 1870s Afghanistan campaign alone. There had also been a skirmish in southern Africa during the decade and Rowena Crescent was assigned the name Zulu Crescent.

Local residents petitioned against the name and the more peaceable Rowena Crescent came into being soon afterwards.
»read full article


JUNE
16
2020

 

Elia Street, N1
Elia Street was named for local poet, Charles Lamb. Charles Lamb achieved fame in the 1820s when he published a series of essays in the London Magazine under the name of ’Elia’ - the last name of an Italian man that he had worked with when Lamb was a clerk at the South Sea Company.

It was at first called Alfred Street. James Rhodes laid out Sudeley Street, Alfred Street and Vincent Terrace by 1837 and Gordon Street (later Quick Street) in 1838. A few houses in Elia Street, which ran to the New River beside the Scotch church, had already been completed by 1838. Rhodes used at least three builders, William Beckingham, John Wilson, and Thomas Allen, and probably also built the short terrace facing the river between Elia Street and Vincent Terrace.


»read full article


JUNE
15
2020

 

Tadworth
Tadworth is a suburban village in Surrey situated in the south-east area of the Epsom Downs. On a local farm - South Tadworth Farm - is an Iron Age ’Banjo’ enclosure, dating from 400–100 BC.

Tadworth appears in Domesday Book of 1086 as ’Tadeorde and Tadorne’. Its assets were: 2 hides, 5 ploughs and woodland worth 4 hogs.

For centuries after that, a manorial system was in place: namely North Tadworth Manor, South Tadworth Manor and the Rectory Manors of Banstead.

In 1874 a school board was formed for Banstead, Tadworth, and Kingswood, and in 1875 Tadworth and Kingswood School was opened by the board - now Kingswood Primary School.

In 1911 topographer and historian H. E. Malden describes Tadworth as "a hamlet on the Reigate road, included now in the ecclesiastical district of Kingswood".

On 1 July 1900, the railway station opened as ’Tadworth & Walton-on-the Hill’. It is the penultimate station on the Tattenham Corner Line.

The British Transport Police’s training ...
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JUNE
15
2020

 

Rayners Lane
Rayners Lane takes its name from a road in the area which runs from Marsh Road in Pinner to Eastcote Lane in South Harrow. Rayners Lane - the road - had been used for transporting grain to the mill on Pinner Green during the Middle Ages. Previously called Bourne Lane, during the first half of the nineteenth century the area was in the hands of the farming Rayner family and the road was renamed after them.

The Metropolitan Railway opened a branch to Uxbridge in 1904 and Rayners Lane station opened as Rayners Lane Halt on 26 May 1906.

Until then mostly rural, a 1930s development originally named Harrow Garden Village was planned. This was one of Metroland’s flagship projects. The area was suddenly built up as a result between 1929 and 1938 by Harrow’s biggest interwar housebuilder T.F. Nash, who created a shopping parade on Alexandra Avenue. Nash constructed a temporary narrow gauge railway sidings at High Worple to bring in materials for the project.

A now-listed, but now closed, Art Deco cinema was opened in 1935 featuring a curved projection on the front, ...
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JUNE
13
2020

 

St Albans Place, N1
St Albans Place was home to a famous Islington strong man. During the 18th century, there was a pub here called the ’Duke’s Head’ on the south east corner of the street. It was known from 1600 onwards and presumably this dates the street to the rural origins of Islington.

The pub was kept at that time by Thomas Topham (1710-1749), a famous strongman who had been a publican at Coldbath Fields at the age of 24. He was originally a carpenter and stood 5 feet 10 inches according to contemporary records.

In nearby Bath Street, during 1741, he lifted three barrels of water - weighing 1183 pounds - by his neck in front of a huge crowd of thousands which included Admiral Vernon, the naval victor of Portobello and Carthagena. Portobello Road is named after Vernon.

Topham could also twist pewter plates into the shape of three-cornered hats. In the British Museum can be found a dish made of the hardest pewter that had been rolled up by Topham.

His story didn’t end well. After stabbing h...
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JUNE
11
2020

 

Cricklewood Broadway (1933)
Smiths of Cricklewood were notable clockmakers. The photo can be accurately dated due to the performance of "The One Girl" listed on the poster.
»read full article


JUNE
9
2020

 

Hornsey Road, N7
Hornsey Road is main road running through the Islington and Highbury area In very early times, Hornsey Road was called Tallington Lane or Tallingdon Lane. It was part of the old road to Whetstone by way of Crouch End.

Its variable name came from the settlement of Tollington which was already located around the junction of Heame Lane and Tollington Lane (later Seven Sisters Road and Hornsey Road) by 1000 - a moated farmhouse lay on the south side of the junction. Although Tollington remained in use as a placename to the end of the 17th century, it was superseded by Holloway and the hamlet had ceased to have a separate identity by the 18th century.

The junction of Hornsey Road and Holloway Roads was known as Ring Cross by 1494.

By 1586, there was a freehold house with a garden, orchard and moat called Lower Place alongside the roadHornsey Roadin the Kinloch Place area. By 1721, this had become an inn.

By the eighteenth century, Hornsey Road has become called Duval’s Lane. About 1802 it was said...
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JUNE
8
2020

 

Lodge Farm
Lodge Farm was owned by Merton Priory until the dissolution of the monastery in 1538. Sir Richard Garth was Lord of the Manor in the 1600s.

This farm was originally called Spital Farm - it is not known when its name changed to Lodge Farm. It was a mixture of arable, grass, orchards and market gardening.

From the late 1700s to the early 1900s, the farm was owned by members of the Hoare banking family but they only lived at The Lodge (a large house) next door until the mid nineteenth century. The farm itself was by then run by their bailiff but in the latter half of the 1800s, the land was divided and leased to various farmers.

In 1910, The Lodge is described as being of timber with a pantile roof. It had a sitting room, kitchen, two bedrooms, a wash room, an outside toilet and a garden. Various cow stalls were described and three farm yards mentioned. There were also stables.

There was a public footpath through the farm estate which went from Central Road (formerly Morden Lane) to Bishopsford Road (formerly Su...
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JUNE
6
2020

 

Shoulder of Mutton Alley, E14
Shoulder of Mutton Alley might derive its name from an inn - or something more earthy. Shoulder of Mutton Alley might have received its name from a food market - there was certainly one here of the same name.

But there was, in older times, another use of the word ‘mutton’ - a slang term for prostitutes. This was prime dockland territory, after all.
»read full article


JUNE
4
2020

 

Batts Farm
Batts Farm is first mentioned in the will of Peter Batt in the late eighteenth century. The farm consisted of arable meadow, pasture land, coppice ground and 70 acres known as Batts Land. There was also a barn, stable yard and a house. Part of the land extended on the west to Green Wrythe Lane and to the River Wandle on the east.

Peter Batt left the farm to his sisters Mary Batt and Elizabeth Bassett. In 1798, Mary Batt leased it to a Henry Hoare for a term of 21 years. There was a proviso in the lease that "he did not cut all the trees".

Henry Hoare sold the farm in 1828 - it then consisted of various farm buildings and two new brick-built cottages. These cottages were mostly used by agricultural labourers employed by the farm.

By 1841, the Charles Pimm ran Batts Farm, living there with his son William and daughter Anne. The farmhouse was probably rebuilt in the late 1850s. When Charles died in 1869, William took over and farmed there until he died in 1892. By then, the farm mostly grew grain and vegetables. There was some li...
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JUNE
3
2020

 

Theobald Street, looking north
This image probably dates from the 1950s. Immediately to the right of the photo we see ’The Crown’, a pub situated at the Shenley Road/Theoald Street junction until the 2010s - replaced by a supermarket in the same building.

The war memorial was deemed too much of an obstruction to traffic and so was moved to the junction of Shenley Road and Elstree Way later.

The building behind the war memorial is the original building of ’The Crown’, demolished in 2020 despite listed building protection.


»read full article


JUNE
2
2020

 

Sloane Street, SW1X
Sloane Street runs north to south, from Knightsbridge to Sloane Square, taking its name from Sir Hans Sloane, who purchased the surrounding area in 1712. By 1760, the Swan (or New Swan) inn occupied a group of buildings facing the lane later enlarged into Sloane Street, with a tap house (later the Clock House inn) facing Brompton Road.

The Swan inn dated back at least to 1699, but was largely rebuilt in 1755–6 when a new lease was granted to Joseph Barnham, innkeeper. There was a yard with stables and coach-houses stretching to the west roughly up to the present Hooper’s Court.

Development started in the immediate environs of the inn. Here twelve houses known initially as Gloucester Row were erected under building leases of 1764 from Joseph Barnham to Joseph Clark and William Meymott, both carpenters. Clark built four houses next to the Swan, all leased in 1764. Meymott, a substantial builder based in Southwark and Bermondsey, built the following eight, leased in 1764–7. These were all small and orthodox Georgian terrace houses.

Joseph Clark (described as ‘Joseph Clark the elder’...
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JUNE
1
2020

 

Gracechurch Street, EC3V
Gracechurch Street is in the heart of Roman Londinium - it runs directly over the site of the basilica and forum. The word ’Gracechurch’ is derived from ’Gres-cherch’ or ’Gras-cherche’. The ’Gracechurch’ version was not used until after the destruction of all of the buildings in the street during the Great Fire of London in 1666. During its history, the street was for a period named Gracious Street.

It was a late Anglo-Saxon street and seems to have been built around the same time as London Bridge (10th/11th century) to which it provided access.

The church is was named after - St Benet Gracechurch stood at the junction with Lombard Street. It was destroyed in the Great Fire.

In medieval times a corn market was held beside the church. Leadenhall Market dating from the 14th century is still the street’s most noted attraction.

Originally at its southern end, it was called New Fish Street. North of Cornhill, Gracechurch continued as Bishopsgate Street.

The street was on the royal processional route. When the ...
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